•   
  •   
  •   

US Small towns used to see prisons as a boon. Now, many don't want them.

13:48  10 june  2021
13:48  10 june  2021 Source:   nbcnews.com

Mobile vaccination units hit tiny US towns to boost immunity

  Mobile vaccination units hit tiny US towns to boost immunity FALLON, Nev. (AP) — Pick-up truck drivers motor up to a white trailer in a parking lot on Fallon Paiute-Shoshone land in Nevada’s high desert and within a few moments they’re handed forms to sign, jabbed with coronavirus vaccine and sent on their way. The pop-up clinic 60 miles (96 kilometers) east of Reno is one of 28 locations in the state where the Federal Emergency Management Agency has dispatched mobile vaccination units to ensure people in far-flung rural areas and one stop-light towns can get inoculated.

"Inside Out" by Keri Blakinger is a partnership between NBC News and The Marshall Project, a nonprofit newsroom covering the U.S. criminal justice system. The column draws on Blakinger’s unique perspective as an investigative journalist and formerly incarcerated person.

  Small towns used to see prisons as a boon. Now, many don't want them. © Provided by NBC News

In 1998, hundreds of excited Nebraskans packed into the high school gymnasium in Tecumseh to voice their support for a new business in town: a state-of-the-art maximum-security prison.

Officials eagerly anticipated hundreds of jobs, a boom in population and a surge in local business investment. One resident likened it to qualifying for the Orange Bowl, and The Omaha World-Herald described the windfall that the lockup would bring as a "lottery jackpot" for the 1,700-person town.

Joe Biden pushes 'Shots at the Shop' vaccination initiative; West Virginia offers guns, cash as vaccine incentives: Today's COVID-19 updates

  Joe Biden pushes 'Shots at the Shop' vaccination initiative; West Virginia offers guns, cash as vaccine incentives: Today's COVID-19 updates President Joe Biden unveiled plans to recruit 1,000 Black-owned barbershops and salons to help in the vaccination effort. Latest COVID-19 news.Biden announced a multipronged effort aimed at reaching that marker, including plans to recruit 1,000 Black-owned barbershops and salons to provide "Shots at the Shop" and promote vaccinations nationwide.

More than two decades later, those promises ring hollow in Tecumseh, where the 960-bed facility has become more burden than boon, adding to the city’s court costs while doing little to help the town’s economy grow. Other communities have taken note. Now, as Nebraska officials buck the national trend of closing prisons and seek to erect a new mixed-security facility, they're finding few takers.

a group of sheep in a fenced in area: Image: Tecumseh State Correctional Institution (Nati Harnik / AP) © Nati Harnik Image: Tecumseh State Correctional Institution (Nati Harnik / AP)

“The last time we had a new prison ... multiple towns put in bids for it,” said Doug Koebernick, the inspector general whose office provides accountability and independent oversight of Nebraska prisons. “But not this time. I think there are a few reasons for that, including the realization that it isn't really an economic development driver.”

Dummies in beds, unlocked doors: Justice IG finds security lapses at federal prison camps raise escape risk

  Dummies in beds, unlocked doors: Justice IG finds security lapses at federal prison camps raise escape risk Justice inspector general: 'Inmates sometimes place dummies in their beds or physically place themselves in other inmate beds during inmate counts.'A memorandum issued Monday by Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz said "multiple" escape investigations have found unlocked doors, malfunctioning alarms, no surveillance cameras and some old-fashioned deception by inmates.

The proposed 1,500-bed facility would be the state’s biggest and would need around 460 workers to run it.

Richard Grauerholz, the mayor of Ashland, was approached last year about the possibility of hosting a prison. He said people in his 2,500-person town prefer to work in metro areas. Omaha and Lincoln, the state’s biggest cities, are both about a 30-minute drive away.

“There’s not a big labor pool here,” he said. “And I have talked to people in Tecumseh.”

Officials in Waverly and Wahoo, other towns along the Omaha-Lincoln corridor, told local media last year that they’d been approached about hosting the new $230 million prison, too, but weren’t interested. It’s not clear whether the prison system has found any interested towns.

“Given that the proposal is still in its very preliminary stages,” a state Department of Correctional Services spokeswoman said, “it is not appropriate for us to speculate about who is or is not interested at this time.” The director of the state prison system declined an interview request.

Bureau of Prisons Allowed Four Inmates to Escape Through the Use of Dummies and Body Doubles: DOJ Inspector General

  Bureau of Prisons Allowed Four Inmates to Escape Through the Use of Dummies and Body Doubles: DOJ Inspector General The report addressed to a Trump era holdover notes that "inmates sometimes place dummies in their beds or physically place themselves in other inmate beds during inmate counts." The post Bureau of Prisons Allowed Four Inmates to Escape Through the Use of Dummies and Body Doubles: DOJ Inspector General first appeared on Law & Crime.Inmates at a federal prison in Texas pulled a fast one on prison guards by escaping with the help of body doubles–both real and fake.

When I was in prison 10 years ago for a drug charge in upstate New York, we never thought about whether the locals wanted us there. All we knew was that we were in a small town far from where most of us lived and far from our families. We never talked about whether those aging prisons in rural New York helped the towns that hosted them — but from our drives by on the prison bus, it sure didn’t look like it. It wasn't until later that I realized that while it’s better for many prisoners to remain near cities, where they can maintain the relationships they’ll need to succeed on the outside, those aren’t the places where constructing a prison looks good for economic development. Looking good, though, isn't the same as helping.

Decades ago, when prisons started proliferating in rural America, correctional facilities were seen not as economic boons but as undesirable neighbors. New lockups raised concerns about escapees and plummeting property values, and sparked old-fashioned NIMBYism. But by the mid-1980s that began to change, as people realized that prisons meant stable government jobs.

Heat assistant Caron Butler trying to end prison solitary confinement in Connecticut

  Heat assistant Caron Butler trying to end prison solitary confinement in Connecticut Former NBA player and current Miami Heat assistant Caron Butler knows all about solitary confinement. “Being in those four walls and those four corners, it does something to you,” Butler told The Associated Press. “Mentally and spiritually, it takes away a lot. It dehumanizes you.” Butler, a former UConn star, visited the Connecticut state Capitol Monday to ask Gov. Ned Lamont to pass legislation that would essentially eliminate solitary confinement and other isolation forms in prisons in the state, per the report. The bill would require almost all inmates to have at least 6.

“What was once a decidedly undesirable enterprise has now become the focus of hot competition among communities looking to stimulate the local economy,” Lindenwood University political science professor Jeanie Thies wrote in a 1998 paper. One town in Illinois even went so far as to write and sing a song — “Is We Is or Is We Isn’t Gonna Get Ourselves a Prison?” — as a plea to the state’s site selection committee.

Since then, studies have shown that prisons are not the jackpots once promised. In 2003, The Sentencing Project, which advocates shorter prison sentences, found that new lockups don’t necessarily help local economies, and rural counties that built prisons followed a similar economic trajectory as those that didn’t.

“Prisons did very little for the local economy, because unlike with other kinds of employment, where there are linkages with other businesses in the area, prisons didn’t buy things locally,” Thomas Johnson, a retired University of Missouri professor who studied prison towns, told me. “People were disappointed generally because they didn’t bring the jobs — and the jobs they did bring were mostly not the kinds of jobs people in the area wanted anyway.”

It seems that was true in Tecumseh. But there were other, unexpected downsides. The county was forced to pay for incarcerated people’s autopsies, grand juries to investigate deaths at the prison, defense lawyers for people accused of committing new crimes behind bars and the expensive prosecutions stemming from a 2017 prison riot that left one man dead.

For criminal justice reform to work, Biden must dismantle damage done by 1994 crime bill

  For criminal justice reform to work, Biden must dismantle damage done by 1994 crime bill While in Senate, Biden pushed through legislation that labeled men like me 'predators.' For his equity agenda to succeed, he must dismantle his past.So I've been watching closely as President Joe Biden has shaped the beginning of his presidency as one that champions equity and racial and social justice reform. But he has yet to fully address how he will fix the damage caused by his 1994 crime bill – the act is, in part, responsible for the severe overincarceration of young Black and brown men who disproportionately populate the country's juvenile and adult prisons.

“At the time, they said there would be no additional costs to the county or town due to the prison,” said Ted Evans, a commissioner in Johnson County, which is home to Tecumseh, referring to state officials. “Obviously, either they didn’t tell us the truth, or they didn’t realize the cost.”

The lockup boosted some businesses along Highway 50, he said, but it hasn’t spurred growth. Many of the prison workers commute instead of moving to town, and the population now is actually less than it was two decades ago.

a group of people standing in front of a fence: Image: Tecumseh State Correctional Institution (Nati Harnik / AP) © Nati Harnik Image: Tecumseh State Correctional Institution (Nati Harnik / AP)

Last year, in testimony to a state legislative committee, Department of Correctional Services Director Scott Frakes admitted that the Tecumseh site didn’t work out as expected.

“Tecumseh's problem in the beginning was unfortunately just no one to draw from,” he said, referring to staffing challenges, “and that mistaken belief that was repeated across the country that if you build a prison near a little community, it will expand the economy.”

That “mistaken belief” has played out throughout the country. What’s unique now is the way that Nebraska is so publicly considering bucking that trend.

In an era of declining incarceration rates, most places aren’t having a conversation about whether to build a new prison; Texas, Florida, California, New York and Connecticut all announced prison closure plans over the past year.

In Nebraska, the prison population has increased by more than 25 percent over the past 15 years, driven in part by longer sentences and an increase in recidivism. By the end of last year, the state’s lockups were stuffed to more than 150 percent capacity — but state officials still seem cautious about the huge new expense.

Prison break: 29 inmates escape federal lockups in 18 months

  Prison break: 29 inmates escape federal lockups in 18 months WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past 18 months, 29 prisoners have escaped from federal lockups across the U.S. — and nearly half still have not been caught. At some of the institutions, doors are left unlocked, security cameras are broken and officials sometimes don't notice an inmate is missing for hours. At one Texas lockup, security is so lax that local law enforcement officials privately joke about its seemingly “open-door policy.

a group of people standing in front of a sign: Image: A billboard advertises the availability of jobs with the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services in 2018 (Nati Harnik / AP) © Nati Harnik Image: A billboard advertises the availability of jobs with the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services in 2018 (Nati Harnik / AP)

"Money is always a concern,” said Rep. John Stinner, the Republican who chairs the state’s Appropriations Committee. “When you’re building something that’s going to last 50 to 100 years, you just want to make sure that you have all the facts and consider all of the other alternatives.”

In recent months, it seems that plan has changed. While the new prison was originally pitched as a way to add several hundred more beds and relieve overcrowding, a report this spring billed it as a replacement for the aging Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, which is smaller and in need of nearly $200 million in repairs.

In March, Stinner’s committee voted to set aside about half the money required to build the new facility — though they didn’t actually appropriate it, so it can’t be spent. For now, they’re asking for a study about how to lower the prison population by decreasing recidivism, even as the agency is asking for design bids for the new facility. Proposals are due June 21 — but they’ll still have to find a Nebraska community willing to welcome a potentially expensive new neighbor.

Alabama asks court to dismiss part of suit over prisons .
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — A Justice Department lawsuit challenging sanitation and safety concerns in Alabama's men's prisons is too vague and should not be allowed to go forward, the state said in asking a court to dismiss part of the case. The federal government has not specified which prisons are troubled by problems like broken locks, insufficient or faulty surveillance cameras and flooding caused by poor plumbing, the state argued in documents filed Wednesday, so the Department of Corrections can't defend itself. Even if the Justice Department spelled out specific problems, there's no evidence they are a pattern in the state prison system, the state argued.

usr: 1
This is interesting!