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US Fact check: Did a company 3D-print rhino horns to help slow down poaching? Yes, but it didn't last long

01:50  11 june  2021
01:50  11 june  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

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o Selling synthetic horn does not reduce the demand for rhino horn or dispel the myths around rhino horn and could indeed lead to more poaching because it increases demand for “the real thing”. o More than 90% of “ rhino horns ” in circulation are fake (mostly carved from buffalo horn or wood), but o How can consumers and law enforcement officials distinguish between legal synthetic horn that looks real, and illegal real horn ? o Companies benefitting from making synthetic horn have shown very little commitment to use their profits to help the core problem of rhino poaching ; besides which, those

Rhinoceros poaching is an enormous problem worldwide, with an estimated 7,245 African rhinos lost to poachers over the last decade alone. We’ve previously covered high tech solutions to the poaching problem ranging from the use of drones to keep tabs on wildlife populations to an ambitious plan to While it remains to be seen whether over-supplying fake rhino horns and other items is really the best approach to counter poaching (personally, we’d like to see this in conjunction with other methods designed to counteract the threat). However, if it can help cut down on the unnecessary slaughter of

The claim: Company 3D-printed fake rhino horns, plans to combat poaching

a man holding an animal: People in nature, first place: Davis Huber, Los Angeles. According to NWF: Dedicating her life to caring for an orphaned black rhino, Ranger Salome Lemalasia offers a tender stroke within the safe confines of Kenya’s Sera Rhino Sanctuary, established in 2015 to protect this critically endangered species. Named Loijipu, this young male was abandoned at birth. “Their bond seemed incredibly loving and trusting,” says Davis Huber. “For me, this image conveys hope.” © Davis Huber, 2020 National Wildlife® Photo Contest People in nature, first place: Davis Huber, Los Angeles. According to NWF: Dedicating her life to caring for an orphaned black rhino, Ranger Salome Lemalasia offers a tender stroke within the safe confines of Kenya’s Sera Rhino Sanctuary, established in 2015 to protect this critically endangered species. Named Loijipu, this young male was abandoned at birth. “Their bond seemed incredibly loving and trusting,” says Davis Huber. “For me, this image conveys hope.”

Non-profits continue to search for an effective way to stop illegal rhino poaching, which has left most of the species critically endangered.

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In Africa, 892 rhinos were poached for their horns in 2018, down from a high of 1,349 killed in 2015. The decline in deaths is encouraging, but conservationists agree that poaching still poses a dire threat to Africa’s rhino population, which hovers around 24,500 animals. Pembient, a Seattle-based bioengineering company launched in 2015, is already exploring the development of 3 D - printed rhino horn . Matthew Markus, Pembient’s chief executive officer, said he would be open to testing the new horsehair formula.

(File photo of a rhino after it was dehorned in an effort to deter the poaching of one of the world's endangered species, at a farm outside Klerksdorp, South Africa.Thomson Reuters). The illegal wildlife trade is a massive business, and it 's killing thousands of endangered species every year. They're used to make elaborate carvings across East Asia and also believed to have curative properties in some traditional Eastern medicines, despite a lack of evidence. Pembient, a Seattle-based biotech startup, is trying to solve the rhino poaching crisis with a 3 D printer and some clever economics.

One widespread social media post claims a biotech company found the solution.

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"A biotech startup has managed to 3-D print fake rhino horns that carry the same genetic fingerprint as the actual horn," the caption of an image shared May 27 on Facebook read.

The caption said the company, which they don't identify by name, "plans to flood (the) Chinese rhino horn market" at a fraction of the cost of real rhino horns to force poachers out of business.

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The image shows two Thai Customs Department officials holding confiscated rhino horns during a press conference. It was taken in 2014 by the Associated Press.

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A San Francisco biotech startup has managed to 3 D print fake rhino horns that carry the same genetic fingerprint as the actual horn . It plans to flood Chinese market with these cheap horns to curb poaching . Matthew Markus, CEO of Pembient says his company will sell rhino horns at one-eighth of the price of the original, undercutting the price poachers can get and forcing them out eventually. We can produce a rhinoceros horn product that is actually more pure than what you can get from a wild animal.

Rhino killings also slowed . Poachers killed 662 rhinos in Kruger in 2016, according to Edna Molewa, then the minister of environmental affairs . The following year, as Skukuza Regional Court ramped up, the number dropped to 504. Last year in Kruger, 328 rhinos were poached . “ It ’s quite concerning for our side.” The closure of the court, Hudson said during her interview with Phiri, “raises suspicion in the public’s eyes. Is there an underhanded motive here that someone maybe is being paid off by the poaching syndicates who don’ t like the fact that this court is as effective as it is?”

Shared by a self-described positive news account, the image has received almost 20,000 shares since it was posted May 27. USA TODAY reached out for comment.

Versions of the same claim date back to at least 2015 on Reddit and 2016 on Facebook.  The image resurfaced in late May on Twitter and Reddit.

The technology exists, but this image being shared as current news doesn't reflect the present reality.

Technology created in 2015

While the post doesn't directly identify what company purportedly created fake rhino horns with genetics similar to a real horn, USA TODAY found some claims led to reports about Pembient, a Seattle-based company.

A biotech company, Pembient announced its project to develop products "genetically and spectrographically similar to rhino horn" in 2015.

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The process of creating the horn starts with producing a keratin protein-based powder, Pembient CEO Matthew Markus told CNN in 2015. That powder is then manufactured and shaped into a horn with 3D-printing techniques.

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Unfortunately, dehorning rhino and trimming elephant tusks isn' t a practical solution to the poaching crisis. Anyone willing to shoot a park ranger isn’ t likely to devote the time and effort to perform a complex procedure safely on an animal in the field. Certain contained populations might benefit from a coordinated effort to trim rhino horns to deter poachers , but it would have to be every single rhino within a confined area or it likely wouldn' t make any difference to the number of animals killed.

Fact is, Rhino reproduce at a slow rate, a female may only have about 5 Rhino young throughout her lifetime, of which some may die from illness or injury. Currently Rhino are being poached at a rate of around 2 per day, so they simply cannot reproduce fast enough. There is an economic interest to breed polled cattle for dairy farmers. Because if the cows grow horns naturally, they are most likely going to be dehorned as a calf. Not only it can be a stressful and sometimes painful for the calves, but it also costs more to the farmer [3] .

Keratin, a protein found in hair, fingernails and animal hooves, is one of the main ingredients in a rhino horn, according to the U.S. Fish and Wild Service.

The technology was developed with the goal of slowing down the illegal poaching of rhinos, which poses a threat to the five living rhino species.

Rhino poaching grew starting around 2010, and in 2015, a record 1,349 African rhinos were poached, according to an analysis by conservationist nonprofit Save The Rhino International.

Since 2015, the number of rhinos poached has consistently decreased. In 2019, the most recent year for which data is available, around 760 rhinos were poached.

The World Wildlife Fund said the decrease in South Africa, home to the largest population of rhinos, was the result of combined efforts from government, private and nonprofit partners, including stricter policing and educating the neighboring communities.

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The sale of the horns was expected to begin in September 2016, CNN reported. But USA TODAY found no press releases or information about the horns ever reaching the market, and USA TODAY's attempts to reach Pembient were unsuccessful.

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The company was dissolved June 3 by the state of Washington because Pembient didn't file its annual report before the due date of Jan. 31, official documents show.

Would it help reduce illegal poaching?

Rhinos are poached for their horns, which societies throughout time have used for traditional medicinal purposes and as a symbol of status.

The price of rhino horns in the black market varies widely, but rhino horns can cost up to $100,000 per kilo in Asian black markets, CNN reported in 2017. A horn can weight up to 8 pounds.

In 2016, Markus told the Woodrow Wilson International Center, a think tank in Washington, D.C., he hoped Pembient's rhino horns would lead to a drastic decrease in poaching. Pembient said 45% of rhino horn purchasers would accept using lab-made horns, according to a survey it conducted in 2015.

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But top rhino users don't want fakes, according to Lynn Johnson, founder of nonprofit Nature Needs More, who spoke with The New York Times in 2019 after interviewing some of these buyers.

Johnson said fake rhino horns won't help reduce poaching since it doesn't address the heightened social status a rhino horn brings.

"Calls for fake rhino horn just shows that there's a lack of understanding about the true commercial nature and consumer desire of current demand," she told the Times.

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Pembient was not the only one looking to develop convincing fake rhino horns.

In 2019, scientists at the University of Oxford in England and Fudan University in China created a fake rhino horn using horsehair.

The horn was created with horsehair because the animal is a close relative of rhinos, giving it a similar chemical composition. The hair used was glued together with a mix of regenerated silk that mimics a real horn.

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Both horn alternatives faced pushback.

These genetically similar horns could complicate policing and detection of real horns being smuggled, according to the U.S. Fish and Wild Service.

"If the real and synthetic products are visually and diagnostically indistinguishable, such production would create opportunities for laundering real wildlife products as cultured products, undermine educational efforts to reduce demand, and potentially introduce a new, broader consumer base for endangered species products," the government agency wrote in a paper submitted at the 2016 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

Another concern is that the fake horns could drive up the demand for real horns. The status that came with owning a real horn would increase as fake horns become commonly available to everyone, according to Save The Rhino International, which opposes the development and sale of synthetic rhino horn.

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"Selling synthetic horn does not reduce the demand for rhino horn or dispel the myths around rhino horn and could indeed lead to more poaching because it increases demand for 'the real thing,'" the organization said in a press release.

Our rating: Partly false

The claim that a company 3D-printed fake rhino horns and plans to combat poaching is PARTLY FALSE, based on our research. There was an effort along these lines, but the timeline presented in this claim is wrong. The claim has been around since at least 2015, when Pembient started working on the technology. But the company has since been dissolved, and we couldn't find evidence its horns ever reached the market. Because the image was posted after Pembient's efforts ended, the claim that the company "plans to flood the Chinese rhino market" with its fake rhino horn is incorrect.

Our fact-check sources:

  • Associated Press Images, Jan. 20, 2014, Thailand Rhino Horns
  • The Medical Facts, July 9, 2016, Facebook post
  • WayBack Machine Archive, June 20, 2015, Reddit thread by user KRISHNA53
  • Andrew Heaton, May 27, tweet
  • WayBack Machine Archive, June 1, Reddit thread by user mk19ez
  • Very important positivity, May 27, Facebook post
  • CISION PR Newswire, Jan 27, 2018, Pembient, Purveyor of Bioengineered Rhino Horn, is Admitted to IndieBio Accelerator
  • CNN , May 21, 2015, Biotech startup creates rhino horns - without rhinos
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed June 9, Facts about Rhino Horn
  • Save The Rhino, accessed June 9, Poaching statistics
  • World Wildlife Fund, accessed June 9, Rhino poaching on the decline in South Africa
  • PBS Nature, Aug. 27, 2020, Rhinoceros Fact Sheet
  • Al Jazeera, Aug. 21, 2017, Online rhino horn auction set to open in South Africa
  • CNN, Aug. 23, 2017, South Africa's controversial rhino horn auction gets underway
  • Wilson Center, March 8, 2016, Innovation Ecosystems: Matthew Markus on using synthetic biology to stop rhino poaching
  • Scientific Reports, Nov. 8, 2019, Creating artificial Rhino Horns from Horse Hair
  • The New York Times, Nov. 25, 2019, Scientists Created Fake Rhino Horn. But Should We Use It?
  • Nature Needs More, accessed June 9, What We Do
  • Save The Rhino International, July 1, 2016, Synthetic rhino horn: Will it save the rhino?
  • U.S. Fish and Wild Service, September 2016, Actions to combat wildlife trafficking
  • CITES, accessed June 9, What is CITES

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Fossils unearthed in China reveal a new species of giant prehistoric rhino - the largest land mammal to ever walk the Earth

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Our fact check work is supported in part by a grant from Facebook.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fact check: Did a company 3D-print rhino horns to help slow down poaching? Yes, but it didn't last long

Fossils unearthed in China reveal a new species of giant prehistoric rhino - the largest land mammal to ever walk the Earth .
Giant rhinos were roughly the size of six elephants and they moved back and forth across Asia as their climate changed.Paleontologists discovered a complete skull from one rhino and three vertebrae from another, in the Linxia basin in the Gansu Province of northwestern China. The set of bones is 26.5 million years old.

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