•   
  •   
  •   

US Why are workers in the U.S. still dying from heat exhaustion?

12:46  20 june  2021
12:46  20 june  2021 Source:   nbcnews.com

3 Miami Heat players who won't be back next season

  3 Miami Heat players who won't be back next season With the Miami Heat getting swept out of the first round of the 2021 NBA Playoffs, here are three players that won’t be back next season. The Miami Heat went from a trip to the NBA Finals in 2020 to getting stomped out by the Milwaukee Bucks in four games in the first round in 2021. With ni ne impending free agents and Jimmy Butler seeking a maximum contract extension, there are critical decisions facing the Heat this offseason. Here are three players who may not be back in South Beach next year. 3. Trevor Ariza Trevor Ariza is an accomplished NBA veteran with 17 seasons under his belt.

As a brutal heat wave rips across the country, thousands of workers who toil outdoors face risks of heat stress, with no specific federal standard that covers working in hot environments. Climate scientists and labor advocates are pressing individual states to enhance their worker protections In 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration denied a petition submitted by a consumer advocacy group called Public Citizen calling on the agency to set a heat standard in 2012. A second petition from the group is still sitting with the agency. OSHA issued a request earlier this month for

14 hours ago. ARTICLE AD. Extreme heat is a public health crisis that disproportionately affects low-income communities, minorities and seniors, labor advocates say.

As a brutal heat wave rips across the country, thousands of workers who toil outdoors face risks of heat stress, with no specific federal standard that covers working in hot environments.

a person flying through the sky © Provided by NBC News

Climate scientists and labor advocates are pressing individual states to enhance their worker protections, while federal lawmakers consider two new bills that would create measures such as paid breaks in cool spaces, access to water and limitations on time workers are exposed to heat as temperatures hike to daily record levels.

“Extreme heat is a public health crisis and a lot of social and economic inequities come with it,” said Oscar Londoño, executive director of WeCount!, a Homestead, Florida-based immigrant worker advocacy organization. “We see heat disproportionately impacts low-income communities, minorities and seniors,” he said.

US News & World Report ranks the nation's best children's hospitals. Is one near you?

  US News & World Report ranks the nation's best children's hospitals. Is one near you? Ten hospitals earned a place on the annual report’s “Honor Roll” – fronted by Boston Children's Hospital for the eighth consecutive year.The publication surveyed 193 facilities analyzing clinical outcomes, the level and quality of hospital resources, delivery of health care and expert opinions among pediatric specialists and ranked the top hospital across seven regions:

PHOENIX (AP) — Doctors who work in Arizona and Nevada burn centers are warning of injuries from contact with super- heated roadways and other surfaces as the first extreme heat wave of the year extends across the U . S . West. A high pressure system is expected to push temperatures above 115 In the Southwest, the problem of burns from hot surfaces is growing as temperatures rise due to climate change and increasing urbanization. And it shows up in emergency rooms like the one at the Arizona Burn Center in Phoenix, where director Dr. Kevin Foster said 104 people were admitted in June, July

Heat exhaustion occurs when the body’ s core temperature is less than 104 degrees Fahrenheit, but blood pressure is low and the heart isn't pumping blood as efficiently as usual, Peter Shearer, MD, emergency physician and chief medical officer at Mount Sinai Brooklyn, tells Health. You should also wear loose and lightweight clothing, apply sunscreen generously (sunburn affects your body' s ability to cool itself), be aware of any medications you're taking that increase your sensitivity to high temperatures, try to exercise in the morning or evening to avoid peak heat , and refrain from doing

Workers exposed to extreme heat are particularly vulnerable to illness. Between 1992 and 2017, heat stress injuries killed 815 U.S. workers and seriously injured more than 70,000, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Overall, more than 65,000 people visit the emergency room for heat-related stress a year and about 700 die from heat, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The majority of these cases are concentrated in Florida, where heat drove more than 6,000 people to the emergency room in 2019, a 35 percent increase from 2010, when heat resulted in roughly 5,000 ER visits, according to data from the CDC.

In 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration denied a petition submitted by a consumer advocacy group called Public Citizen calling on the agency to set a heat standard in 2012. A second petition from the group is still sitting with the agency. OSHA issued a request earlier this month for information on heat illness as it considers a possible new rule.

It's time for domestic workers to have rights

  It's time for domestic workers to have rights This summer, as we celebrate the days, months and holidays that mark the freedom and beautiful diversity of this country, keep our domestic workers in mind. If you employ them, know the law where you live and be sure they are paid and treated fairly. Congress holds the keys to a National Domestic Workers Bill of Rights moving forward. Let them know that you support fair labor and employment practices for all and will no longer be silent while domestic workers are treated like second-class citizens.Nicole Evelina is a USA Today bestselling author.

AccuWeather has the details you need to know about heat stroke, a serious health condition, and heat exhaustion , which precedes it. Olympic champion Laurie Hernandez and world champion Morgan Hurd will not compete at the U . S . Olympic Gymnastics Trials in two weeks.

Why are workers in the U . S . still dying from heat exhaustion ? The West is the driest it' s been in 1,200 years — raising questions about a livable future. "The sea is very violent. In the rough season, we can't do anything," said the head of Sri Lanka' s Marine Environment Protection Authority.

"This and the other activities outlined in the Spring 2021 regulatory agenda emphasize OSHA’s renewed commitment to workplace safety and health," the Department of Labor told NBC News in an emailed statement.

While heat affects workers across a range of industries, U.S. farmworkers are 20 times more likely to die from illnesses related to heat stress than workers overall, the CDC said. As temperatures rise, this figure is estimated to grow. Farmworkers labor through about 21 unsafe working days every growing season when the heat index reaches 84 degrees, according to a March 2020 analysis by researchers with the University of Washington. But by the end of the century, the study estimates, U.S. farmworkers will work an average of 62 days in unsafe conditions.


Video: Bipartisan Senate group moves forward with own plan for infrastructure deal (NBC News)

“Heat illness affects workers in our nation’s fields, warehouses and factories, and climate change is making the problem more severe every year,” said U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., who introduced a bill in March that would require OSHA to create an enforceable standard to protect workers from heat. “This legislation will require OSHA to issue a heat standard on a much faster track than the normal OSHA regulatory process. Workers deserve no less,” he said.

You Probably Have a Migrant Worker to Thank for Your Milk

  You Probably Have a Migrant Worker to Thank for Your Milk In the course of conducting her research on undocumented dairy farm workers, sociologist Julie C. Keller was privy to a call between Mac, a dairy farmer in Wisconsin, and Adulio, a former farmworker, then in Mexico. The seemingly backward relationship between Adulio and Mac illustrates just how essential undocumented immigrants have become to the dairy industry in the United States. Three recent books—Milking in the Shadows by Keller, The Deportation Machine by Adam Goodman, and Life on the Other Border by Teresa M.

Six months later, the South Carolina man is still in the hospital. “They had to resuscitate him twice. He done been through a lot,” said Brown. “Thank God, he' s still here.” Dialysis patients like Brown and his son are extremely vulnerable to COVID-19 and its severe complications, in part because of comorbidities that coincide with chronic Charles Brown III, 33, a dialysis patient, was hospitalized due to COVID-19 and is still recovering from complications, his father said. The first known U . S . COVID-19 death was a dialysis patient at Northwest Kidney Centers in Seattle, according to reports.

Sorry that doesn’t work .” Mr Gorman explained that as CEO he had returned to the office for one day a week by Labor Day last year and incrementally increased those days over time. Since March this year he has been working four days in the office, he said. The CEO said that “if people haven’t found their way into the office” by Labor Day in September, the company would be having a “different kind of conversation”. Why are workers in the U . S . still dying from heat exhaustion ?

All workers are covered by OSHA’s “general clause” protections, which require employers to keep workplaces “free from recognized hazards,” including heat. But without a specific standard, workers have no recourse to address heat exposure, said Rachel Licker, a senior climate scientist with the nonprofit organization Union of Concerned Scientists.

“It’s a regulation and those aren’t necessarily welcome,” she said, referring to businesses. “But our perspective is that it shouldn’t be regarded as another regulation, because it is affording basic protections.”

Allison Crittenden, director of congressional relations with the American Farm Bureau Federation, told NBC News in an emailed statement that farmers prioritize worker safety, including access to water, frequent breaks as temperatures rise and monitoring for illness.

“America’s farmers adhere to local, state and federal workforce safety rules and they strive to create a safe and productive environment for all of their employees," she said. "We are concerned with approaches to heat illness protection that take a one-size fits all approach and do not consider individual health needs and regional differences in weather.”

West's drought has no end in sight: 'If we do nothing, it’s going to be really bad'

  West's drought has no end in sight: 'If we do nothing, it’s going to be really bad' Drought in California, Utah, Nevada and other Western states has no end in sight. Water conservation is needed, but some fear it won't be enough.The crisis isn’t unique to Utah. About 40% of the country is currently experiencing drought conditions, according to U.S. Drought Monitor.

The country’s agricultural industry amounts to a $136 billion market, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Largely dominated by several states, including California, Oregon, Washington and Florida, just three have passed state laws that specifically address heat-related worker protections.

Florida has failed to pass two bills introduced in the state Senate over the last two years. Some employers have dragged their feet on improving farm conditions for workers voluntarily, Londoño said. Now, the organization is pushing for a countywide standard that would require employers in Miami-Dade County to provide access to water and shade during extreme heat.

a man wearing a hat and sunglasses posing for the camera: Image: Jose Delgado. (Erick Sanchez) © Erick Sanchez Image: Jose Delgado. (Erick Sanchez)

Jose Delgado, a 72-year-old farmworker based in Homestead, told NBC News that a rule is long overdue. A few years ago during a month of working sweet potato fields during scorching temperatures, he collapsed on his way to cash his check at the bank. He said he had been feeling sick but dragged himself to work every day with a large water bottle because he needed to work. The day he collapsed, the doctors in the emergency room told him he had kidney failure and if he had waited even five minutes longer to get medical attention, he could have died.

“I still am afraid for my life because of the heat and I still need to work,” said Delgado, who is undocumented and earns between $100 and $300 a week as a contract farmworker. “I don't receive any kind of health benefits and I’ve been paying taxes since the 1990s. It becomes difficult because I do believe I deserve benefits.”

He still doesn’t have access to water or shade. When he becomes too hot, he crawls under his truck for a brief break from the sun.

“We are the workers that put food on the table and we suffer through the heat,” he said. “We deserve a pay that is fair and reasonable, and consciousness that we’re putting our lives at risk.”

3 Heat trades that make too much sense not to happen .
The Miami Heat can head back into contention for the NBA title next season if they were to consider trading for one of these three players. The Miami Heat found out at the worst possible time that what took place in the Orlando, Fla. bubble last season was not sustainable. The team was content wi th the build of the roster, believing that they could make another run to the NBA Finals this year. That was far from the case, as the team was swept convincingly by the Milwaukee Bucks in the first-round. Now, the Heat enter an important offseason to try and figure out what it is they can do to be convincing contenders heading in the Eastern Conference.

usr: 8
This is interesting!