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US Sons of Confederate Veterans sue to return Georgia monument

04:40  22 june  2021
04:40  22 june  2021 Source:   msn.com

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Note: This is a sublist of List of Confederate monuments and memorials from the Georgia section. This is a list of Confederate monuments and memorials in Georgia that were established as public

Sons of Confederate Veterans released a statement condemning the actions of the police officers in the George Floyd death, and McCluney described it as a “very unfortunate thing.” But he says it hasn’t changed the purpose or thinking of his organization. However, nearly 40 descendants of Confederate soldiers are now suing the city over its planned removal, which has been delayed because the contractor hired to remove it backed out after receiving numerous calls from locals who support the monument . “They're trying to portray it as racism,” Anthony said, before offering an

DECATUR, Ga. (AP) — The Sons of Confederate Veterans group has sued to return a 30-foot-high (9-meter) obelisk to a site in front of a Georgia courthouse.

Workers remove a Confederate monument with a crane Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Decatur, Ga. The Sons of Confederate Veterans have sued to return the 30-foot-high obelisk to the site in front of the Georgia courthouse. The monument was taken down last year after a judge in Decatur agreed that it had become a threat to public safety. News outlets report that the suit was filed Wednesday, two days short a year after the monument's removal. (AP Photo/Ron Harris, file) © Provided by Associated Press Workers remove a Confederate monument with a crane Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Decatur, Ga. The Sons of Confederate Veterans have sued to return the 30-foot-high obelisk to the site in front of the Georgia courthouse. The monument was taken down last year after a judge in Decatur agreed that it had become a threat to public safety. News outlets report that the suit was filed Wednesday, two days short a year after the monument's removal. (AP Photo/Ron Harris, file)

The monument was taken down and moved to storage last year after a judge in Decatur agreed with the city's argument that it had become a threat to public safety during protests about racism and police brutality.

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PagesOtherBrandWebsiteSociety & Culture WebsiteSons Of Confederate Veterans - Southwest Georgia . Have you ever been to a Sons of Confederate Veterans camp meeting and you just did not want it to end? That is how I felt tonight, we had members of several other camps visiting with us. The number of folks there was the largest group we have had so far.

The Sons of Confederate Veterans rose to prominence after the BLM movement swept the US, seeking to change perceptions of the South and explain why they proudly fly the Confederate flag, even if some think it’s a toxic symbol. The snap impression of the Sons of Confederate Veterans isn’t a good one. A rudimentary glance at their mainstream media portrayal is far from flattering and their badge proudly features the controversial Confederate flag. Terms that spring to mind are: racist, exclusionary and backward.

The suit was filed Wednesday, two days short of a year after the monument’s removal, news outlets reported.

The group suggests that city officials colluded to get around a state law protecting historic monuments, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

It contends that the monument was not found to be a public nuisance.

DeKalb County Judge Clarence Seeliger’s ruling last year said it had become “an increasingly frequent target of graffiti and vandalism, a figurative lightning rod for friction among citizens, and a potential catastrophe that could happen at any time if individuals attempt to forcibly remove or destroy it.”

His final order, in September, said the obelisk should never be returned to the square.

“The world is full of controversy. And if we were to say anything that causes controversy is a public nuisance, that’s an endless road to go down,” attorney Walker Chandler, who filed the lawsuit, told WXIA-TV.

In an email to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Decatur City Attorney Bryan Downs called the suit a “tardy, vexatious attack on properly entered rulings by a Georgia court of law.”

He said the group had more than three months to try to intervene before Seeliger's final order but did nothing.

“The Petition they have now filed is factually incorrect, legally flawed, and procedurally deficient,” Downs wrote. “In short, it is a lost cause.”

House to vote to remove Confederate statues from the Capitol .
The measure passed the House in the last Congress but stalled in the GOP-controlled Senate. Last year, 72 Republicans voted with Democrats to take the statues down. Democrats hold a razor thin majority in the Senate and would need 60 votes to advance the bill.When the measure was reintroduced in the House earlier this year, House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., cited the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, in which some Trump supporters paraded Confederate flags and other symbols of hate, as a reason to do away with the statues.

usr: 1
This is interesting!