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US Mississippi marker honors 2 Black men killed by Klan in 1964

04:06  16 july  2021
04:06  16 july  2021 Source:   msn.com

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A new Mississippi historical marker honors two young Black men who were kidnapped and killed by Ku Klux Klansmen 57 years ago. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi . A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore.

Ku Klux Klansmen killed three civil rights workers in 1964 and buried the bodies on Burrage's land. Burrage was accused of conspiracy after three men murdered by the Ku Klux Klan were buried on his land in Mississippi (right). Black Widow actress is 'secretly expecting' second child - and bundle Girl is dragged to an abandoned house and shot by her tribe in ' honour killing ' after running off with

MEADVILLE, Miss. (AP) — Friends and relatives gathered Thursday in a tiny town in southwestern Mississippi to dedicate a new state historical marker honoring two young Black men who were kidnapped and killed by Ku Klux Klansmen 57 years ago.

A woman who attended a dedication ceremony for a new Mississippi historical marker walks by the marker on Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss. The sign provides information about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus) © Provided by Associated Press A woman who attended a dedication ceremony for a new Mississippi historical marker walks by the marker on Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss. The sign provides information about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)

Investigators found the remains of college student Charles Eddie Moore and lumber mill worker Henry Hezekiah Dee in a backwater of the Mississippi River in July 1964. It happened as officers were searching for three civil rights workers who had disappeared from central Mississippi the previous month.

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The three young men were chased in their car, abducted, shot at close range, and buried in an earthen dam by members of the local White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan , the Neshoba County Sheriff's Office, and the Philadelphia, Mississippi Police Department. Initially classed and investigated as a missing persons They were college students who had disappeared in May 1964 ; they were found to have been kidnapped, beaten and killed by whites. Federal searchers also discovered 14-year-old Herbert Oarsby, and five other unidentified Mississippi blacks , whose disappearances in the recent past had

Mississippi Cold Case is a 2007 feature documentary produced by David Ridgen of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation about the Ku Klux Klan murders of two 19-year-old young black men , Henry Hezekiah Dee and Charles Eddie Moore

Thomas J. Moore, who lives in Colorado Springs, Colo., speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., at the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of his brother, Charles Eddie Moore, and friend Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Charles Eddie Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus) © Provided by Associated Press Thomas J. Moore, who lives in Colorado Springs, Colo., speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., at the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of his brother, Charles Eddie Moore, and friend Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Charles Eddie Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)

Military veteran Thomas Moore, 78, said Thursday that the new marker helps ensure his brother and their friend and high school classmate, Dee, will be remembered and that they won't just be footnotes in the history of what the FBI called the “Mississippi Burning” case — the Klan killings of Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman.

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In his testimony in Jackson, Mississippi , Mr Edwards said the two teenagers were stuffed alive into the trunk of Seale's car and driven to a farm. The indictment said he aimed a shotgun at the two black men while fellow Ku Klux Klan members beat them. Mr Edwards, who was granted immunity for his testimony, said Seale attached heavy weights to the During the movement of the 1950s and 1960s, dozens of black people were killed by whites who wanted to retain racial segregation. Few of the crimes were solved, partly because some of the perpetrators were protected by state and local officials.

Former Ku Klux Klan leader convicted in the 1964 ' Mississippi Burning' slayings of three civil rights workers dies in prison aged 92. His conviction came 41 years to the day after James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman, all in their 20s, were ambushed and killed by Klansmen. The three Freedom Summer workers had been investigating the burning of a black church near Philadelphia, Mississippi when a deputy sheriff arrested them on a traffic charge.

Moore, who lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado, told people Thursday under the hot summer sun in Meadville that while “Black Lives Matter” is a theme now, “they mattered back then, too.”

James Ford Seale and Charles Marcus Edwards briefly faced state murder charges in the deaths of Dee and Charles Eddie Moore in 1964, but the charges were dismissed because local law enforcement officers were in collusion with the Klan, federal prosecutors said in 2007.

A makeshift memorial stands next to a new Mississippi historical marker that was dedicated Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., to remember Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee, who were kidnapped and killed by Ku Klux Klansmen in 1964. Law enforcement officers found the remains of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus) © Provided by Associated Press A makeshift memorial stands next to a new Mississippi historical marker that was dedicated Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., to remember Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee, who were kidnapped and killed by Ku Klux Klansmen in 1964. Law enforcement officers found the remains of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)

Prosecutors said Seale was with a group of Klansmen in May 1964 when they abducted the two 19-year-olds from a rural stretch of highway, took them into the woods and beat and interrogated them about rumors that Black people in the area were planning an armed uprising. The victims were thrown in the trunk of a car, driven across the Mississippi River into Louisiana and then were weighted down and dumped into the water while still alive.

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Nineteen men , including Killen, were indicted on federal charges in the 1967 case. Seven were convicted of violating the victims’ civil rights. None served more than six years. Killen’s federal case ended with a hung jury after one juror said she couldn’t convict a preacher. During his state trial in 2005, witnesses testified that on June 21, 1964 , Killen went to Meridian to round up carloads of Klansmen to ambush Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman, telling some of the Klan members to bring plastic or rubber gloves. Witnesses said Killen then went to a Philadelphia funeral home as an alibi while the fatal

In 1964 three civil rights workers were murdered by the Klu Klux Klan . David, the brother of Andrew Goodman remembers how nationwide shock helped change America for good. Show more. Andrew Goodman was one of the three civil rights workers killed by the Klu Klux Klan in Mississippi in 1964 . He and the other two victims, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, had been working on a project to register African-Americans to vote. For Witness, Andrew's brother David recalls his brother's strong sense of justice and what his family lived through in the 44 days he was missing.

Dudley Ford Lampton Sr. speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., at the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. Lampton's twin brother, the late Dunn Lampton, was the U.S. attorney who led the prosecution in 2007 of a reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale. A jury in federal court in Jackson, Miss., convicted Seale on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus) © Provided by Associated Press Dudley Ford Lampton Sr. speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., at the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. Lampton's twin brother, the late Dunn Lampton, was the U.S. attorney who led the prosecution in 2007 of a reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale. A jury in federal court in Jackson, Miss., convicted Seale on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)

Many people thought Seale was dead until 2005, when Thomas Moore and a Canadian broadcaster, David Ridgen, found him found living in a town near where the teens were kidnapped. Federal authorities opened a case, and Edwards became the government’s star witness after he was promised immunity from prosecution. When jurors were out of the courtroom one day during Seale's 2007 trial, Edwards apologized to the victims' families.

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“That released me from the cell I had locked myself in,” Thomas Moore said Thursday, recalling the apology.

A federal jury in Jackson, Mississippi, convicted Seale of kidnapping and conspiracy. He died in federal prison in 2011.

Shannon Sieckert of Walnut Creek, California, has worked for a civil rights education organization and helped Thomas Moore apply for the Mississippi historical marker.

“The state needed to officially recognize these two men, that their lives mattered, that they were important,” Sieckert said.

Dunn Lampton, the U.S. attorney who prosecuted Seale, died in 2011 after being injured in a crash. His twin brother, Dudley Ford Lampton Sr., said Thursday that the prosecutor developed a bond of trust with Thomas Moore because both served in the military. Dudley Ford Lampton Sr. said his brother told him: “'If I can convict Mr. Seale, I believe justice will be done.'”

Thelma Collins, who lives in Springfield, La., speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., after the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of her brother, Henry Hezekiah Dee, and friend Charles Eddie Moore. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus) © Provided by Associated Press Thelma Collins, who lives in Springfield, La., speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., after the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of her brother, Henry Hezekiah Dee, and friend Charles Eddie Moore. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)

During the ceremony, Thomas Moore led about two dozen people in singing a gospel song: “I will trust in the Lord ‘til I die.... I’m going to treat everybody right ‘til I die.... I’m going to stay on the battlefield ’til I die.”

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Thomas J. Moore, who lives in Colorado Springs, Colo., speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., at the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of his brother, Charles Eddie Moore, and friend Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of the state. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Charles Eddie Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus) © Provided by Associated Press Thomas J. Moore, who lives in Colorado Springs, Colo., speaks Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss., at the dedication of a Mississippi historical marker about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of his brother, Charles Eddie Moore, and friend Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of the state. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Charles Eddie Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)

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Follow Emily Wagster Pettus on Twitter at http://twitter.com/EWagsterPettus.

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