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US Tropical Storm Fred, masks in Florida schools, Perseid meteor shower: 5 things to know Wednesday

14:24  11 august  2021
14:24  11 august  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Georgia schools return to class as the state sees a Covid-19 summer surge

  Georgia schools return to class as the state sees a Covid-19 summer surge Stefanie Watts admits she's worried about sending her granddaughter and her son back to school on Monday. © Erik S. Lesser/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Mandatory Credit: Photo by ERIK S LESSER/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock (12227927t) Signs continue to encourage mask wearing and social distancing for the upcoming fall semester despite ventilation improvements at Kelley Lake Elementary School in Decatur, Georgia, USA, 23 July 2021.

a little girl holding a sign: Students wearing protective masks walk past a © Chris O'Meara, AP Students wearing protective masks walk past a "Welcome Back" sign before the first day of school at Sessums Elementary School Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021, in Riverview, Fla.

Tropical Storm Fred forms; island territories, nations expected to feel impact

A disturbance swirling in the Caribbean became Tropical Storm Fred late Tuesday and was just south of Puerto Rico early Wednesday heading for the Dominican Republic, Haiti and the Bahamas. Forecasters warned that its heavy rains could cause dangerous flooding and mudslides. "I am not going to minimize the potential impact of this event ... we expect a lot of rain," Puerto Rico Gov. Pedro Pierluisi said. Fred, the sixth named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, could intensify once it reaches the waters south of Florida or the eastern Gulf of Mexico by this weekend, forecasters said. People in Florida were urged to monitor updates, but forecasters also said it remained uncertain where the storm would move later in the week. There have been no named storms since Hurricane Elsa dissipated early in July, but this time of summer usually marks the start of the peak of hurricane season.

'People who do not want to be vaccinated may go elsewhere': Court backs Indiana University mandate

  'People who do not want to be vaccinated may go elsewhere': Court backs Indiana University mandate An appeals court judge denied a group of students' request to block Indiana University's COVID-19 mandate ahead of the fall semester.That was the message delivered by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in a ruling issued Monday that will allow the public university's requirement that all students and employees receive a COVID-19 vaccine before the start of the fall semester to stand.

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Florida county to begin mask mandate in schools, defying Gov. DeSantis

Leon County Schools Superintendent Rocky Hanna said in a livestreamed announcement Tuesday that children from pre-kindergarten through eighth grade will be required to wear masks when classes resume in Florida's capital of Tallahassee Wednesday. The order defies Gov. Ron DeSantis' attempts to block schools from imposing such a mandate. Though the county mandate allows some exemptions for students, it doesn't give parents the authority to opt out, as DeSantis wanted. The governor's office responded by saying the state's Board of Education could move to withhold salaries from the superintendent or school board members. Several other Florida counties – including Broward, Duval, Hillsborough, Orange and Palm Beach – are also defying DeSantis' order. White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters Tuesday the Biden administration is looking at whether it can use unspent COVID-19 relief funds to combat pay cuts DeSantis imposes.

Children can be affected by Covid-19. Here's why doctors say they need to be protecte

  Children can be affected by Covid-19. Here's why doctors say they need to be protecte Doctors say keeping kids Covid-free is critical to ensure in-person learning, prevent unforeseen complications and help stave off more aggressive variants.Since this time last year, more than 45,000 children have been hospitalized with Covid-19, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • Data then and now: As kids return to school, most Florida counties report COVID-19 cases four times higher than last year
  • Defying the president: Gov. DeSantis says he will 'stand in the way' of Biden on COVID-19 restrictions
  • Help or 'get out of the way': Biden criticizes governors in Texas and Florida over handling of COVID-19

Want to see 'fireballs' light up the sky? Catch the Perseid meteor shower

Look up, the best meteor shower of the year begins Wednesday, and will peak Aug. 11 to 13. The Perseid shower, known for its bright, long streaks of light and dazzling "fireballs," will continue through Aug. 24.Luckily for people in the United States, the shower is more visible in the Northern Hemisphere. However, it does require staying up late, and a clear view of the sky. The Perseid shower is best seen at about 2 a.m. local time, but can be visible as early as 9 p.m. Discovered in 1862 by Lewis Swift and Horace Tuttle, the shower originates from Earth entering the orbit of debris from the comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, which takes 133 years to orbit the sun. At its peak, up to 100 meteors an hour can be seen in the night sky.

Florida children's hospitals are overwhelmed with coronavirus cases, expert says

  Florida children's hospitals are overwhelmed with coronavirus cases, expert says The polarization surrounding mask mandates is deepening as some state and local officials spar on how to approach face coverings protocols in schools, a debate unfolding as more children contract Covid-19. © Brynn Anderson/AP A student raises their hand in a classroom at Tussahaw Elementary School on Wednesday, August 4, 2021, in McDonough, Georgia. Schools have begun reopening in the U.S. with most states leaving it up to local schools to decide whether to require masks.

  • Previous coverage: The Perseid meteor shower is the best of the summer
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Samsung may soon 'unfold' plans for new flip smartphones

Samsung wants you to "get ready to unfold." The electronics company is expected to unveil new flip and foldable phones at its online "Samsung's Galaxy Unpacked: Get Ready to Unfold" event on Wednesday . Its website teases: "For the past decade and more, we’ve seen smartphone innovations change our daily lives. Why change a good thing? ... We're about to give you better." Samsung's first foldable phone, the Galaxy Fold, came to market in September 2019. Its Galaxy Z Flip smartphone launched in February 2020, and was followed by the Galaxy Z Flip 5G in August 2020. Consumers interested in getting early dibs on the electronics giant's next flagship device can go to Samsung's Reserve Now site to get in line for an exclusive pre-order offer.

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Marvel is asking, 'What if?'

Move over, Steve Rogers. Peggy Carter's the captain now. Marvel's new animated "What If...?" series, premiering on Disney+ Wednesday, reimagines key characters, storylines and scenarios in its cinematic universe. For example: The first of nine weekly episodes takes fans back to "Captain America: The First Avenger" and explains what would have happened had British intelligence agent Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) received the super-soldier serum in 1942 instead of Army soldier Rogers (Chris Evans). The show also features the late Chadwick Boseman in his final performance as T'Challa. Other series appearances include, Chris Hemsworth as Thor, Tom Hiddleston as Loki, Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury and many others.

Ron DeSantis Loses Battle With Florida Cruise Line Over Vaccine Passports

  Ron DeSantis Loses Battle With Florida Cruise Line Over Vaccine Passports Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed a bill into law in May that prohibited businesses operating in the state from requiring proof of COVID vaccination.On Friday, Norwegian Cruise Line asked Judge Kathleen Williams to block the ban of requiring written proof of a COVID vaccine in Florida, arguing that it jeopardized the health and safety of crew members and was in breach of the First Amendment's right to free speech.

  • Exclusive: Hayley Atwell's Peggy Carter wrecks villainous goons in Marvel 'What If...?' preview
  • Excitement: Marvel fans celebrate hearing Chadwick Boseman's final performance as T'Challa in new trailer
  • God of Mischief's sexuality: Tom Hiddleston's Loki confirmed as Marvel's first bisexual lead character
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Contributing: The Associated Press

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Tropical Storm Fred, masks in Florida schools, Perseid meteor shower: 5 things to know Wednesday

COVID booster shots, exits from Afghanistan, 3 named storms: 5 things to know Wednesday .
A U.S. announcement on the need for a COVID booster shots could come, three named storms keep swirling and more news to start your Wednesday.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

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