•   
  •   
  •   

US Almanac says we're in for one of the coldest winters in 'years.' Should you trust it?

10:55  02 september  2021
10:55  02 september  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

How much money each PGA Tour player earned at the Northern Trust

  How much money each PGA Tour player earned at the Northern Trust It pays to play well on the PGA Tour, folks. Just ask this week’s winner, Tony Finau, who earned his second win Sunday, claiming the 2021 Northern Trust at Liberty National in Jersey City, New Jersey. It's Finau's first win in more than five years. He shot 67-64-68-65-264 to fi nish regulation at 20 under, tied with Cameron Smith. Finau then won on the first playoff hole with a par after Smith went out-of-bounds with his tee shot. Finau will take home $1,710,000, while Smith earned $1,035,500 for his runnerup finish. Jon Rahm, who led or co-led after the first three rounds, finished solo third, good for $655,500.

We're in for a chilly winter. At least, that's what is being predicted in this year's "Old Farmer's Almanac."

a man riding on top of a snow covered forest: Neighbors dig out a driveway in Foxboro, Massachusetts, Monday, March 4, 2019, after the area received well over a foot of snow in an overnight storm. © Mark Stockwell, AP Neighbors dig out a driveway in Foxboro, Massachusetts, Monday, March 4, 2019, after the area received well over a foot of snow in an overnight storm.

The newest edition of the 230-year-old series projects the 2021-22 winter as a particularly cold one, dubbing it the "season of shivers." The almanac's editor, Janice Stillman, says it could even be "one of the longest and coldest that we’ve seen in years."

The almanac, which has often stirred up debate about its accuracy, suggests this winter will deal an icy combo of above-average snowfall and below-average temperatures in the New England area, as well as parts of the Appalachian region, the Ohio Valley and the northern part of the Deep South. Interestingly enough, it predicts a colder and snowier-than-usual winter for southern New Mexico, as well.

BMW Championship: Who's in, who's bubble burst in FedEx Cup Playoffs

  BMW Championship: Who's in, who's bubble burst in FedEx Cup Playoffs JERSEY CITY, N.J. – Tony Finau wasn’t the only player who came through in the clutch on Monday at the Northern Trust. In the tournament within the tournament, six players punched their ticket for this week’s BMW Championship, th e second leg of the three event FedEx Cup Playoffs and kept their hopes alive to win the $15 million in bonus money awarded to the champion. While Finau closed in 65 at Liberty National to win the title in a sudden-death playoff, Keith Mitchell birdied the final three holes to jump 38 places to No. 63 and bump Matthew Wolff to the wrong side of the cutline at No. 71.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Much of the western U.S., an area already besieged by drought, should expect more dryness, the almanac projects. Nearly all of California, currently battling the raging Caldor Fire near Lake Tahoe, is pegged for a mild and dry winter, along with most of Arizona and parts of western Washington and Oregon.

Before and after: Photos reveal the horror of California's Caldor Fire near Lake Tahoe

Previously: US declares first water shortage on Colorado River amid historic drought; cuts expected for Arizona farmers

Only a few areas of the country, like the Pacific coast and the northern Plains region, are predicted to experience only "mild" temperatures. Just about everyone else should get ready to bundle up, the almanac says.

No, the decades-long decline in trust in media isn’t Trump’s fault

  No, the decades-long decline in trust in media isn’t Trump’s fault There is a type of journalist who is so drunk on his own self-importance and the myth of infallibility of the free press that he is unable to recognize the news industry’s struggles with credibility are largely self-inflicted. © Provided by Washington Examiner The New Yorker’s Susan Glasser is such a journalist. Trust in the news media declined between 2016 and 2021 across all partisan categories, according to recent Pew Research Center data. Democrats and Republicans have lost faith in “national news organizations,” while the “all adults” category has seen a similar drop in trust.

Almanac predicts chilly temps. Should you trust it?

"The Old Farmer's Almanac" has made a name for itself by providing long-term weather forecasts on an annual basis. The book also gives readers full moon dates, recipes and various self-help tips.

But these big picture weather predictions should be taken with a grain of salt, some weather experts say.

Both the "Old Farmer's Almanac," which began in 1792, and the "Farmer's Almanac," which started in 1818, got their starts more than a century before satellite weather tracking became a practice.

The "Old Farmer's Almanac" says its secret weather-predicting formula was devised in 1792 by its founder, Robert B. Thomas, and notes about the formula are "locked in a black box" at the almanac's offices to this day. The almanac appears to have changed with the times, though.

"Over the years, we have refined and enhanced that formula with state-of-the-art technology and modern scientific calculations," the almanac's website reads.

'Pollution may shorten life in India by nine years'

  'Pollution may shorten life in India by nine years' Millions in north India face the most extreme levels of air pollution in the world, the report says.The study says 480 million people in northern India face the "most extreme levels of air pollution in the world" and, over time, these high levels have expanded to cover other parts too.

The almanac says it now uses solar science, climatology and meteorology to make long-term weather predictions.

Hurricane Ida's strength may have seemed surprising. But not to forecasters.

Still, experts have for years been dubious of the almanac's accuracy.

In 2016 and 2017, meteorologist Jan Null conducted an accuracy review of the "Old Farmer's Almanac," giving out grades to the almanac's winter forecast based on how the projections compared to the actual weather outcome in each region of the U.S.

Null's rating system was relatively simple, assigning one of three grades – good, bad and mixed – to the almanac's temperature and precipitation predictions in each region of the U.S.

Say, for instance, the almanac predicted a dry season in one region. If that region ended up experiencing below average rainfall, Null would assign a "good" accuracy rating to the forecast for that region. If it received above average rainfall, the forecast earned a "bad" rating. And if it had average rainfall, the forecast earned a "mixed" rating.

Just 25% of the 57 regions reviewed got a "good" accuracy rating for precipitation predictions in the 2016 and 2017 editions of the "Old Farmer's Almanac." For temperature predictions during that same time span, the almanac earned a "good" accuracy rating on just under 33% of the 52 regions reviewed.

Analysis: Republican trust in media keeps sinking to new lows, opening door to overlapping misinformation

  Analysis: Republican trust in media keeps sinking to new lows, opening door to overlapping misinformation America is one country with two almost completely separate media ecosystems. It's getting almost impossible to appeal to both. ..Democrats believe; Republicans disbelieveHere's another way to slice the Pew data: "78% of Democrats say they have 'a lot' or 'some' trust in the information that comes from national news organizations -- 43 points higher than Republicans. This partisan gap is the largest it has been over the past five years this question was asked."Washington Post tech reporter Gerrit De Vynck took the words right out of my head: "There's no way to look at this and not be deeply discouraged and sad.

Similarly, OpenSnow found "no track record of accuracy" in a review of 2013-14 winter weather predictions.

The results from a few years of forecasts may be a small sample for a book that dates back to George Washington's presidency, but the findings were a far cry from the almanac's traditional claim of 80% accuracy.

Follow Jay Cannon of USA TODAY on Twitter: @JayTCannon

Our View: Hurricane Ida drives home hellish battle with climate change

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Almanac says we're in for one of the coldest winters in 'years.' Should you trust it?

Falcons restructure Deion Jones' contract, free up $2.8M in cap space .
For the second time this year, the Falcons turned to Deion Jones‘ contract to create cap space. Atlanta completed its latest Jones restructure Thursday, per Field Yates of ESPN.com. © Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports Deion Jones' contract has been restructured yet again. This latest adjustment will give the Falcons an additional $2.8M in cap space. The Falcons’ March Jones restructure generated an extra $4M in room. Atlanta entered Thursday barely $500K under the cap, slotting in above only the Rams for space.

usr: 3
This is interesting!