•   
  •   
  •   

US White House rolls out future pandemic preparedness plan; Hawaii begs travelers to stay away: COVID-19 updates

16:00  05 september  2021
16:00  05 september  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Chiefs' Tyrann Mathieu tests positive for COVID-19, could return for Week 1

  Chiefs' Tyrann Mathieu tests positive for COVID-19, could return for Week 1 Mathieu is fully vaccinated, which means he could return to team activities without completing an isolation period of at least 10 days if he produces two negative virus tests taken 24 hours apart. McDowell added Mathieu was asymptomatic as of Wednesday afternoon. In a corresponding roster move, Kansas City re-signed wide receiver Marcus Kemp. For now, Mathieu is on track to be available for the regular-season opener against the Cleveland Browns held at Arrowhead Stadium on Sept. 12.

The White House is preparing for future pandemics.

The Biden administration unveiled a plan Friday to upgrade the country's ability to respond to biological threats, comparing its scope to the Apollo Program, which was initiated to put a man on the moon.

"We need better capabilities because there's a reasonable likelihood that another serious pandemic that could be worse than COVID-19 will occur soon and possibly even within the next decade," said Eric Lander, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Hawaii health care workers decry lack of COVID mandates

  Hawaii health care workers decry lack of COVID mandates HONOLULU (AP) — Health care workers in Hawaii say a lack of government action is worsening an already crippling surge of coronavirus cases in the islands, and without effective policy changes the state’s limited hospitals could face a grim crisis. “Soon we’re going to be in a situation where we’re going to ration health care,” said Dr. Jonathan Dworkin, an infectious diseases specialist in Hawaii. Dworkin said that while mandates may be unpopular, rationing Hawaii's limited health care resources is “going to be far more ugly.” “It involves making decisions about who lives and dies,” he said.

The cost? $65.3 billion over the next decade. A good chunk of that money will go toward vaccine development and distribution, the White House said. Administration officials are hoping an initial $15 billion will pass through Congress as part of the massive $3.5 trillion spending package on the table for this fall.

The plan includes:

  • Dramatically expanding the arsenal of vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics.
  • Strengthening public health systems both in the U.S. and internationally.
  • Improving the ability of the U.S. to produce personal protective equipment and other vital supplies.
  • Improving early detection of pandemic threats.
  • Creating a centralized “mission control” to be in charge of an effort that will draw on multiple federal agencies.

Also in the news:

Hawaii health care workers decry lack of COVID mandates

  Hawaii health care workers decry lack of COVID mandates HONOLULU (AP) — Health care workers in Hawaii say a lack of government action is worsening an already crippling surge of coronavirus cases in the islands, and without effective policy changes the state’s limited hospitals could face a grim crisis. “Soon we’re going to be in a situation where we’re going to ration health care,” said Dr. Jonathan Dworkin, an infectious diseases specialist in Hawaii. Dworkin said that while mandates may be unpopular, rationing Hawaii's limited health care resources is “going to be far more ugly.” “It involves making decisions about who lives and dies,” he said. “I hate the idea of having to make a decision about who’s going to get oxygen.

► New Zealand reported its first COVID death in over six months on Saturday — a woman in her 90s who had underlying health conditions, according to authorities. New Zealand remains in lockdown that began last month after one positive case.

► A German man attacked health care workers at a vaccination site after he demanded a vaccination certificate without receiving a shot, and they refused to give it to him. Police said he became violent and injured two workers, who were treated in a hospital and later released.

► Michigan schools this year are still required to display information about reported COVID-19 cases publicly on their websites, under an order from the state health department last October. But some of those dashboards are hard to find or navigate.

???? Today's numbers: The U.S. has recorded more than 39.9 million confirmed COVID-19 cases and more than 648,100 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Global totals: More than 220.3 million cases and 4.5 million deaths. More than 175.8 million Americans — 52% of the population — have been fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

Red Sox place Danny Santana on COVID-19 IL as outbreak continues to worsen

  Red Sox place Danny Santana on COVID-19 IL as outbreak continues to worsen Shortly after announcing that right-hander Nick Pivetta had been placed on the COVID-19-related injured list, the Red Sox announced that infielder Danny Santana has also been placed on the list. The #RedSox today placed INF/OF Danny Santana on the COVID-19 Related Injured List. To fill Santana’s spot on the active roster, the Red Sox recalled OF Franchy Cordero from Triple-A Worcester.

???? What we're reading: Pediatric ICUs are under stress as more kids are getting hospitalized for COVID-19, RSV or both at the same time. Read more here.

Keep refreshing this page for the latest news. Want more? Sign up for USA TODAY's Coronavirus Watch newsletter to receive updates directly to your inbox and join our Facebook group.

Hawaii struggles with delta surge, begs travelers to stay away

Hawaii has already reported more than twice as many coronavirus cases this year as it did in all of 2020, Johns Hopkins University data show.

The data show Hawaii had been reporting 66,778 COVID-19 cases through Saturday afternoon. It had reported 22,007 cases in all of 2020.

The annual comparisons don't begin to tell how much Hawaii struggled with a wave of cases pushed by the delta variant. In just the last month, Hawaii has reported more cases than it did in all of last year.

Hawaii's governor has begged tourists to stay away from the islands through October.

– Mike Stucka

'I'm conflicted': Travelers weigh Hawaii plans after governor begs tourists not to come amid COVID-19 surge

Union urges NFL to adopt daily COVID-19 testing for vaccinated players

  Union urges NFL to adopt daily COVID-19 testing for vaccinated players There’s a decent chance that the COVID-19 pandemic will play more of a role during the 2021 NFL season than last year. We’re seeing relaxed protocols from the league as it relates to fully vaccinated players with Week 1 of the campaign slated to get going Thursday evening. It has already led to some COVID-related issues for teams. That includes star guard Zack Martin and the Dallas Cowboys with their opener against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers mere days away. Despite being fully vaccinated, Martin tested positive for the virus and will miss the game.NFLPA president JC Tretter of the Cleveland Browns touched on this recently.

Kentucky health care workers sue over COVID-19 vaccine mandate

Claiming mandatory COVID-19 vaccines are "a fraud upon the entire American public," 40 employees of St. Elizabeth Healthcare have filed a federal lawsuit challenging a requirement they be vaccinated.

The 93-page lawsuit filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Covington, comes amid a surge in COVID-19 cases — largely among unvaccinated patients — that threatens to overwhelm most Kentucky hospitals. Fueled by the delta variant, COVID-19 continues to affect Kentuckians in record numbers.

The lawsuit follows an announcement Aug. 5 by most of the state's major hospital systems, including St. Elizabeth's, based in Northern Kentucky, that they would require vaccines for all workers without a medical or religious exemption to try control the surge of COVID-19 in Kentucky.

– Deborah Yetter, Louisville Courier Journal

Denmark bans unvaccinated US tourists

Denmark is banning unvaccinated tourists from the United States, joining a growing list of European Union member states that are tightening travel restrictions as COVID-19 cases rise.

The change comes after the country moved the U.S. to its "orange" travel advisory category on Saturday. Previously, U.S. tourists could enter Denmark by showing a negative test or proof of recovery. Entry requirements do not change for fully vaccinated U.S. travelers, who are still exempt from testing and quarantine requirements.

Fact check: Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines all passed animal testing

  Fact check: Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines all passed animal testing Each of the three COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in the U.S. passed animal testing studies. Claims otherwise are false.Now some proponents of the anti-parasitic drug traditionally used for animals are falsely claiming COVID-19 vaccinations haven't passed animal studies.

The Netherlands, another EU member state, on Saturday started enforcing a quarantine period for vaccinated U.S. travelers and prohibited entry among unvaccinated travelers. Bulgaria announced it would prohibit travel from the U.S. and Italy added testing and self-isolation requirements for U.S. travelers. Read more here.

– Bailey Schulz

What we know about the mu variant

The mu variant has been marked as a "variant of interest" by the World Health Organization and has spread across Chile, Peru and parts of the U.S. and Europe.

The mu variant is the fifth variant of interest currently being monitored by the organization. Stuart Ray, a professor of medicine at John Hopkins University, said the variant accounts for most cases in Colombian, Chile and Peru, but only some cases in the U.S. as of right now.

As of now, Ray said what’s concerning is mu obtains similarities to deadlier variants such as the delta variant, which is the cause of over 99% of cases in the U.S. Read more here.

– Gabriela Miranda

Contributing: The Associated Pres

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: White House rolls out future pandemic preparedness plan; Hawaii begs travelers to stay away: COVID-19 updates

Biden Poised to Repeat Mistakes that Led to COVID Pandemic, Biosecurity Experts Say .
COVID-19 may have made a future pandemic—from a lab leak, bioterrorism or natural causes—more likely. Is Biden making the right moves to protect us?"Without a doubt, COVID-19 has changed the threat landscape," says Peggy Hamburg, former FDA commissioner and now vice president of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a nonpartisan think tank on global security.

usr: 4
This is interesting!