•   
  •   
  •   

US FBI says accused Jan. 6 rioter tried to attack police at U.S. Capitol with Taser

09:30  26 september  2021
09:30  26 september  2021 Source:   reuters.com

'We suffered and continue to suffer': Simone Biles, elite gymnasts blast FBI over failing to stop Larry Nassar abuse

  'We suffered and continue to suffer': Simone Biles, elite gymnasts blast FBI over failing to stop Larry Nassar abuse Elite gymnasts testified before a Senate panel on the FBI's failure to properly investigate sex abuse allegations against Larry Nassar.“USA Gymnastics and the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee knew that I was abused by their official team doctor long before I was ever made aware of their knowledge," Biles told the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Police managed to grab the Taser , prosecutors said , but Byerly "continued to charge toward the officers." Later, prosecutors said , Byerly was involved with other protestors in an attack on an Associated Press photographer. More than 570 people have faced charges arising from the riot. At least 36 have pleaded guilty to riot-related charges. Earlier, U . S . magistrate judge Peter Silvain in Dayton, Ohio, agreed to pretrial release of David Mehaffie, 62, of Kettering, Ohio, who faces five riot-related charges.

Police managed to grab the Taser , prosecutors said , but Byerly "continued to charge toward the officers." Later, prosecutors said , Byerly was involved with other protestors in an attack on an Associated Press photographer. More than 570 people have faced charges arising from the riot. At least 36 have pleaded guilty to riot-related charges. Earlier, U . S . magistrate judge Peter Silvain in Dayton, Ohio, agreed to pretrial release of David Mehaffie, 62, of Kettering, Ohio, who faces five riot-related charges.

By Mark Hosenball

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A judge on Thursday ordered a Pennsylvania man who prosecutors accuse of running at police during the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot with an electrical Taser device to remain jailed pending trial.

Alan Byerly, 54, who was arrested on riot-related charges on July 7, agreed to his continued detention, his court-appointed lawyer James McHugh told U.S. Magistrate Judge Robin Meriwether.

A prosecution document requesting Byerly's pre-trial detention described him as "a brazen and violent participant" in the riot on Jan. 6, when supporters of then-President Donald Trump sought to block Congress from certifying Joe Biden's election victory.

Protest for jailed Capitol rioters: Police ready this time

  Protest for jailed Capitol rioters: Police ready this time WASHINGTON (AP) — Allies of Donald Trump are mounting a Saturday rally at the U.S. Capitol, aimed at supporting what they call the “political prisoners” of the Jan. 6 insurrection — about 60 people held behind bars of the more than 600 charged in the deadly riot. The repeated attempts to rewrite the narrative of the violence and panic of the day, and the persistent volatility around the politics of the 2020 election have made it impossible to predict what may happen this weekend. After all, l aw enforcement was only expecting a free speech protest the day Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in an effort to disrupt the certification of Joe Biden's victory.

Police managed to grab the Taser , prosecutors said , but Byerly "continued to charge toward the officers." Later, prosecutors said , Byerly was involved with other protestors in an attack on an Associated Press photographer. More than 570 people have faced charges arising from the riot. Mehaffie is charged with other defendants accused of forming a "shield wall" of stolen police equipment as they battled officers at the Capitol . Four people died on the day of the Capitol attack . One was shot dead by police and the other three of natural causes. A Capitol Police officer who had

An FBI informant said to have been among those rioting at the January 6 riot at the US Capitol , passed on real-time updates to his handler as the mob stormed the building. Pictured, Pro-Trump rioters breach the security perimeter and penetrate the U . S . Capitol to protest against the Electoral College vote. The The New York Times reports, the fact the FBI were being texted in real time suggests those in law enforcement were more aware about what was happening on the ground than previously thought.

Prosecutors said Byerly, of Fleetwood, Pennsylvania, was seen near a police line on the Capitol's west side with what appeared to be "a Taser device" which he then, seemingly without provocation, switched on and proceeded to charge at police.


Video: Jan. 6 rioters told Capitol Police sergeant ‘You’re not even an American’ (Yahoo! News)

Police managed to grab the Taser, prosecutors said, but Byerly "continued to charge toward the officers." Later, prosecutors said, Byerly was involved with other protestors in an attack on an Associated Press photographer.

More than 570 people have faced charges arising from the riot. At least 36 have pleaded guilty to riot-related charges.

Earlier, U.S. magistrate judge Peter Silvain in Dayton, Ohio, agreed to pretrial release of David Mehaffie, 62, of Kettering, Ohio, who faces five riot-related charges. Mehaffie is charged with other defendants accused of forming a "shield wall" of stolen police equipment as they battled officers at the Capitol.

Four people died on the day of the Capitol attack. One was shot dead by police and the other three of natural causes. A Capitol Police officer who had been attacked by protesters died the following day. Four police officers who took part in the defense of the Capitol later took their own lives. More than 100 police officers were injured.

(Reporting By Mark Hosenball; editing by Grant McCool)

The AP Interview: Capitol Police chief sees rising threats .
WASHINGTON (AP) — The newly installed chief of the U.S. Capitol Police says the force, still struggling six months after an insurrection that left its officers battled, bloodied and bruised, “cannot afford to be complacent.” The risk to lawmakers is higher than ever. And the threat from lone-wolf attackers is only growing. In an interview with The Associated Press, J. Thomas Manger said his force is seeing a historically high number of threats against lawmakers, thousands more than just a few years ago. He predicts authorities will respond to close to 9,000 threats against members of Congress in 2021 — more than 4,100 had been reported from January to March.

usr: 0
This is interesting!