•   
  •   
  •   

US A fish story that goes back millions of years: Kansas fisherman lands huge alligator gar

07:35  14 october  2021
07:35  14 october  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Florida Woman Suffers 'Severe Injuries' After She Falls into Canal and Is Attacked by Alligator

  Florida Woman Suffers 'Severe Injuries' After She Falls into Canal and Is Attacked by Alligator The woman was asleep on a seawall when she fell into the canal and was "suddenly" attacked by a large alligator, according to St. Pete Fire RescueSt. Pete Fire Rescue confirmed the incident in a press release obtained by PEOPLE, noting that it happened in St. Petersburg on Monday morning.

An alligator gar , a large fish that is often referred to as a "living fossil," was recently caught in Kansas —the first time the species has been recorded in the state, wildlife officials said. Angler Danny Smith caught a four-and-half-foot, 39.5-pound alligator gar specimen last month while fishing one The known range of the alligator gar , which is found in the Mississippi River basin, extends from southwestern Ohio, and southeastern Missouri and Illinois, to parts of the Gulf Coast and small portions of northeastern Mexico. The fish has disappeared from much of its historic range as a result of habitat

The alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) is a ray-finned euryhaline fish related to the bowfin in the infraclass Holostei /hoʊˈlɒstiaɪ/. It is the largest species in the gar family

This is a real big fish tale: A fisherman in Kansas tossed a line in the water and caught a prehistoric predator fish that dates back nearly 100 million years.

Danny Smith II displays a 39.5-pound Alligator Gar, measuring four feet, six inches, which he caught in the Neosho River in southeast Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks officials say the fish is not native to Kansas and previously have not been documented there. © Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks Danny Smith II displays a 39.5-pound Alligator Gar, measuring four feet, six inches, which he caught in the Neosho River in southeast Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks officials say the fish is not native to Kansas and previously have not been documented there.

Danny "Butch" Smith II of Oswego, Kansas, who landed the fish, a 4-foot, 6-inch alligator gar, weighing 39.5 pounds, knew he had caught something unusual. His fishing buddy identified the fish and said, "They ain't supposed to be here (in Kansas)," Smith said.

Florida could lift 30-year ban on catching goliath grouper

  Florida could lift 30-year ban on catching goliath grouper TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida's wildlife agency is proposing to lift its three-decade ban on catching and killing goliath groupers, arguing that the species' numbers have rebounded. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved a draft proposal on Wednesday to allow recreational harvest of 200 goliaths per year from March to May. South Florida and the Florida Keys will be off-limits, and the size of the catch will be restricted to between 20 inches (51 centimeters) and 36 inches (91 centimeters).

Alligator gar aren’t native to Kansas and have never been documented here. “We’re confident the information from the angler is accurate and the fish was, in fact, caught from the Neosho River,” said KDWP Fisheries biologist Connor Ossowski. Since all states involved in alligator gar reintroduction efforts for populations in decline have been tagging each hatchery-produced alligator gar , KDWP staff had the option of looking for a tag. After using a “wand” to detect any identification markers, KDWP staff are confident this catch was not part of a formal reintroduction effort.

Alligator gars are a unique species of fish and are often referred to as “living fossils.” This is because fossil records for the animals have been discovered dating back almost 100 million years . While other species of gar are native to Kansas , alligator gar do not typically live in the area. According to a press release from the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, state biologists are researching how an alligator gar ended up in the state’s Neosho River.

Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks officials confirmed the identification and are investigating how the fish, called a "living fossil," got into the Neosho River in southeast Kansas, east of the city of Parsons.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

They have snouts that resemble American alligators, razor-sharp teeth and can grow beyond 10 feet long and weigh up to 350 pounds, according to NationalGeographic.com. While in prehistoric times, the fish's predecessors may have lived in Iowa or Kansas, modern alligator gars are found in the lower Mississippi River Valley, from Arkansas and Oklahoma to Florida, Texas and parts of Mexico, the site says. Not harmful to humans, alligator gars eat other fish, crabs, turtles, birds and small mammals.

LIVE! UFC ‘Contender Series’ Results, Streaming Play-By-Play Updates

  LIVE! UFC ‘Contender Series’ Results, Streaming Play-By-Play Updates The world’s “toughest job interview” continues this evening as 10 fighters “vie to fulfill their dreams of earning a UFC contract.”Last week’s installment added another handful of newcomers to the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) roster thanks to strong efforts from Mike Malott, Carlos Hernandez, Fernie Garcia, and Genaro Valdéz. Only Joseph Holmes, who dispatched Shonte Barnes by second-round rear naked choke, failed to secure a contract.

Alligator gar are back at Spunky Bottoms. (Left to right) Researcher Nathan Grider of Univeristy of Illinois-Springfield, Doug Carney of Illinois Dept of Natural Resources, Nerissa Michaelsof the Illinois Natural History Survey and Tharran Hobson of The Nature Conservancy. When fisheries biologists Rod Hilsabeck and Trent Thomas of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources decided to return the alligator gar to their state, they knew they needed a perfect location. The Nature Conservancy’s Spunky Bottoms Preserve fit everything they sought.

Alligator gars are a unique species of fish and are often referred to as “living fossils.” Fisherman breaks nearly 30- YEAR -OLD record in florida. While other species of gar are native to Kansas , alligator gar do not typically live in the area. According to a press release from the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, state biologists are researching how an alligator gar ended up in the state’s Neosho River.

Shatner's space trek: William Shatner gets emotional after historic Blue Origin flight: 'I hope I never recover'

Marvel Comics: White editor wrote under a Japanese persona. Coworker quits over the news

Danny Smith II displays a 39.5-pound Alligator Gar, measuring four feet, six inches, which he caught in the Neosho River in southeast Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks officials say the fish is not native to Kansas and previously have not been documented there. © Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks Danny Smith II displays a 39.5-pound Alligator Gar, measuring four feet, six inches, which he caught in the Neosho River in southeast Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks officials say the fish is not native to Kansas and previously have not been documented there.

Video: Giant Alligator Eats Smaller Gator in South Carolina Backyard (NowThis News)

Smith knew he had hooked something big when he was fishing last month. "I thought I had a pretty decent flathead," he told USA TODAY.  "But it fought and fought, pretty soon it come plum out of the water. The shape of its head really threw me off."

Alligator gar found for the first time in Kansas

  Alligator gar found for the first time in Kansas The alligator gar fish, with prehistoric roots, was found in Kansas for the first time in documented history. With fossils nearly 100 million years old, alligator gar are known as "living fossil fish."Angler Danny Lee "Butch" Smith caught the 4.5-foot, 39.5-pound fish (1.37 meters, 17.92 kg) September 20 on a routine fishing trip in the Neosho River, according to the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks. The alligator gar's fossil records date back to nearly 100 million years ago, hence the nickname "living fossil fish.

My first alligator gar —all 6 feet, 90-plus pounds of it—pulled like a semi truck. Now, as it tranquilly lay on the surface next to the boat, Hefner slipped a homemade snare over its head. But when he tightened the cable loop behind its pectoral fins, the gar went berserk, spinning and banging its hard snout In seven years of guiding, Hefner has caught gar with healed machete and ax hacks, and with caved-in skulls and jaws badly deformed by baseball bats. According to Dan Bennett, a fisheries biologist with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, studies have proved that these gar pose no real threat to

Alligator gar is now an ally in the fight against an invasive species. The alligator gar used to swim through U.S. waters from the Gulf of Mexico to Illinois until it disappeared from many states a half-century ago. P ersecuted by anglers and deprived of places to spawn, the fish , which can grow longer than a horse and heavier than a refrigerator, survived primarily in southern states in the tributaries of the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico after being declared extinct in several states farther north.

Soon the fish doubled back and came to the edge of Smith's boat and he pulled it in. But once the big fish was in the boat, "he tore the boat up. I was shocked by it," Smith said.

"The fish was flopping and flipping and destroyed one of my oars. There was one little flathead about 10 or 15 pounds in the boat and it was wanting out of the boat just as bad as I was because (the bigger fish) was tearing up things bad," he said. "(It) has got sharp teeth and double rows of teeth in his mouth."

It's the first time an alligator Gar has been caught in Kansas and was likely released from an aquarium, state officials said. "It's not unlikely this fish was once somebody's pet or purchased from a pet store, and simply released into the river once it became too large," the department's fisheries division director Doug Nygren said in a news release.

Transporting fish across state lines and releasing them or other species into public waters is illegal in the state.

Smith said the state wildlife officials are coming Thursday to do an experiment on the fish's head, which he kept (he gave the fish's body to the officials), to determine its age and perhaps where it came from.

So this fish story is not over yet. "Not yet. It’s still going on," Smith said. "It's just a freak of nature. You spend enough time on the water anything can happen,

Follow Mike Snider on Twitter: @mikesnider.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: A fish story that goes back millions of years: Kansas fisherman lands huge alligator gar

The 5 Best States for Fishing (and the 5 Worst) .
An estimated 55 million Americans go fishing at least once a year.Americans participated in almost 200 million fishing expeditions a year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the number of people fishing is thought to have increased since the start of the pandemic.

usr: 1
This is interesting!