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US Pharmacist Pleads Guilty to Adding Eye-Damaging Chemical to Cataract Surgery Drug

08:55  14 october  2021
08:55  14 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Ban on negotiating Medicare drug prices under pressure

  Ban on negotiating Medicare drug prices under pressure WASHINGTON (AP) — Donna Weiner looks at Medicare’s prescription drug program from two different points of view. As a participant, she wants to pay less for her medicines, which cost her about $6,000 a year. As a retired accountant who spent 50 years handling the books for companies, she sees a way to get there. “You know from working in a business that it makes no sense for an administrator of a plan or a company not to be involved in what they have to pay out,” said Weiner, who lives near Orlando, Florida. For Medicare “to negotiate those prices down would be thousands of dollars back in my pocket every year,” she said.

A Texas pharmacist has pleaded guilty to adding a chemical to a drug that's used during cataract surgery which could permanently damage eyes.

A Texas pharmacist has pleaded guilty to adding a chemical to a drug that's used during cataract surgery which could permanently damage eyes. Pictured above is a stock photo of a pharmacist. © Getty Images A Texas pharmacist has pleaded guilty to adding a chemical to a drug that's used during cataract surgery which could permanently damage eyes. Pictured above is a stock photo of a pharmacist.

On Wednesday, 71-year-old Jack Randall Munn of Dallas, Texas pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of distributing an adulterated drug in violation of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act. Munn will be sentenced on February 3, 2022, and faces a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a fine of up to $100,000.

Russell Wilson’s consecutive starts streak in danger over finger injury?

  Russell Wilson’s consecutive starts streak in danger over finger injury? Russell Wilson suffered a gruesome looking injury during Thursday night’s game between his Seattle Seahawks and Los Angeles Rams, and the star quarterback may be in danger of a missing a start for the first time in his NFL career. © Joe Nicholson-USA TODAY Sports Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson. Wilson will undergo an MRI on Friday and then meet with a hand specialist. While X-rays came back negative, Ian Rapoport of NFL Media reports that it is too early to rule out surgery for the eight-time Pro Bowler.

A federal magistrate will determine the sentence after considering U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other pertinent factors.

According to a court affidavit, Munn, who was a licensed pharmacist and former owner of Guardian Pharmacy Services (Guardian) in Dallas, Texas was in charge of monitoring the cataract drug for two outpatient Dallas surgical centers in 2016 and 2017. The drug, which is a combination of both an antibiotic and a steroid, contained a large quantity of an inactive ingredient that can damage delicate eye tissue.

As described later in the court affidavit, Munn stated that Guardian could create the drug in a safe manner so that it could be injected into patients' eyes. But considering that the drug made by Guardian contained a large quantity of the inactive ingredient, the overall quality of the drug decreased which made it unsafe to administer to patients.

North Dakota Woman Pleads Guilty to Trying to Hit People with Car During Ex-Boyfriend’s Graveside Funeral Service

  North Dakota Woman Pleads Guilty to Trying to Hit People with Car During Ex-Boyfriend’s Graveside Funeral Service A North Dakota woman recently pleaded guilty to attempting to run people over with her car during her ex-boyfriend's graveside funeral service earlier this year. The post North Dakota Woman Pleads Guilty to Trying to Hit People with Car During Ex-Boyfriend’s Graveside Funeral Service first appeared on Law & Crime.A North Dakota woman recently pleaded guilty to attempting to run people over with her car during her ex-boyfriend’s graveside funeral service earlier this year.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Criminal Investigations investigated the case while Assistant Director John Claud, Senior Trial Counsel David A. Frank and Trial Attorney Sarah Williams of the Civil Division's Consumer Protection Branch are prosecuting the case.

In a similar case which was investigated in June by the FDA's Office of Criminal Investigations, a New Jersey chiropractor pled guilty for illegally distributing "steroid-like drugs" while operating a dietary supplements company.

On June 10, 41-year-old Nicholas Andrew Puccio of Columbus, New Jersey admitted to Judge James P. Jones in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Virginia that he purposely mislead and defrauded consumers and the FDA by creating an unapproved new drug for commerce. Puccio also promoted supplements that contained ostarine—one of several chemicals meant to mimic steroids that are known as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs)—to bodybuilders and other people who were in the "fitness community."

Ensuring patients have timely access to necessary medical care

  Ensuring patients have timely access to necessary medical care I urge my colleagues in Congress to take the first step to streamline the prior authorization process by quickly passing H.R. 3173, so that we can ensure that patients get timely access to care and to have a better relationship with their doctor. As a state senator in Iowa, I passed needed reforms in prior authorization that were ultimately beneficial to both the patient and the physician and were not a costly expense. It is vital that we take similar action now to ensure patients have timely access to necessary medical care. Miller-Meeks represents Iowa's 2nd District.

"Marketing misbranded dietary supplements that contain unapproved drugs is illegal and is a threat to public health," Catherine A. Hermsen, assistant commissioner for criminal investigations at the FDA's Office of Criminal Investigations, said in a press statement. "We remain committed to bringing to justice companies and individuals who attempt to subvert the regulatory functions of the FDA by distributing unapproved, and potentially dangerous, drugs."

Newsweek has reached out to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Office of Criminal Investigations for further comments.

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