•   
  •   
  •   

US Nurses Are Quitting in Droves, but Schools Report Higher Program Enrollment

11:36  15 october  2021
11:36  15 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Virginia GOP candidate tests school fight message for 2022

  Virginia GOP candidate tests school fight message for 2022 LEESBURG, Va. (AP) — When Democrat Terry McAuliffe said during the Virginia governor’s debate last week that he doesn’t believe “parents should be telling schools what they should teach,” his opponent pounced. Republican Glenn Youngkin quickly turned the footage into a digital ad, then announced spending $1 million on a commercial airing statewide proclaiming that “Terry went on the attack against parents.” Youngkin's campaign has since foundedRepublican Glenn Youngkin quickly turned the footage into a digital ad, then announced spending $1 million on a commercial airing statewide proclaiming that “Terry went on the attack against parents.

Nursing schools across the U.S. have reported high enrollment as students see the vacancies left by nurses burned out by the pandemic as a career opportunity. Nurses across the U.S. burned out by the COVID-19 pandemic are quitting their jobs or leaving hospitals for traveling nurse positions that pay more, but nursing schools report higher enrollment in the programs .

Nurses across the U.S. burned out by the COVID-19 pandemic are quitting their jobs or leaving hospitals for traveling nurse positions that pay more, but nursing schools report higher enrollment in the programs . According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing , enrollment in the U.S. for bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral nursing programs increased 5.6 percent in 2020 from the year before to just over 250,000 students.

Nurses across the U.S. burned out by the COVID-19 pandemic are quitting their jobs or leaving hospitals for traveling nurse positions that pay more, but nursing schools report higher enrollment in the programs.

Many nurses burned out from the COVID-19 pandemic are quitting their jobs, but nursing schools across the U.S. are reporting an increase in enrollment. Nurses put on personal protective equipment before tending to a COVID-19 patient inside the intensive care unit at Adventist Health in Sonora, Calif., on Aug. 27, 2021. © Nic Coury/AFP via Getty Images Many nurses burned out from the COVID-19 pandemic are quitting their jobs, but nursing schools across the U.S. are reporting an increase in enrollment. Nurses put on personal protective equipment before tending to a COVID-19 patient inside the intensive care unit at Adventist Health in Sonora, Calif., on Aug. 27, 2021.

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, enrollment in the U.S. for bachelor's, master's and doctoral nursing programs increased 5.6 percent in 2020 from the year before to just over 250,000 students.

UConn interim coach Lou Spanos, four others positive for COVID-19

  UConn interim coach Lou Spanos, four others positive for COVID-19 Five members of the UConn Huskies football program have tested positive for COVID-19 and will miss Saturday's game against UMass.UConn confirmed Friday that interim head coach Lou Spanos, offensive coordinator/offensive line coach Frank Giufre, tight ends coach Corey Edsall, left tackle Ryan Van Demark and offensive lineman Will Meyer have all tested positive for the coronavirus.

Nurses across the U.S. burned out by the COVID-19 pandemic are quitting their jobs or leaving hospitals for traveling nurse positions that pay more, but nursing schools report higher enrollment in the programs . According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing , enrollment in the U.S. for bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral nursing programs increased 5.6 percent in 2020 from the year before to just over 250,000 students.

Nursing schools across the U.S. have reported high enrollment as students see the vacancies left by nurses burned out by the pandemic as a career opportunity. Read more

Emma Champlin, a first-year nursing student at Fresno State now doing clinical studies in a COVID-19 ward, said the stress for both nurses and students can be sometimes overwhelming.

"I don't even know when it will stop," she said. "Is this the new normal? I think the scariness of it has worn off at this point, and now we're just all exhausted."

Champlain added that even for nursing students, the strain of the COVID-19 virus "has had me reconsider, at times, my career choice."

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

Figures for the current 2021–2022 school year won't be available until January, but administrators say they have continued to see a spike in interest.

The University of Michigan nursing school reported getting about 1,800 applications for 150 freshman slots this fall, compared with about 1,200 in 2019.

Bob Stoops has bold comment about Iowa’s ranking after big win

  Bob Stoops has bold comment about Iowa’s ranking after big win Iowa defeated Penn State 23-20 to improve to 6-0 on the season while handing Penn State its first loss of the season. Saturday’s matchup at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City featured the Nos. 3 and 4-ranked teams in both the AP and Coaches’ polls. Iowa entered as the No. 3 team and got the win. That prompted a question in Fox’s postgame show asked to former Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops, who is one of the network's TV analysts. Stoops was asked whether Iowa proved it deserves the No. 3 ranking.“They might be second,” Stoops boldly said. “But definitely third, absolutely.

Nurses wanted to have staff to not be trippled in ICU or stuck with 9-15 patients on medsurg with no CNAs, secretary or other ancillary staff. This was pre pandemic. Now you gave them no ppe with sicker patients and still no staff. It was already difficult enough due to the increasing pressure to provide high quality care with an increasing lack of resources without a global pandemic. They are surrounded by more and more deaths daily - I cannot imagine how much affect that has on mental and physical health.

It doesn't feel like nursing school , it feels like a cult. And I just keep thinking I'd be much better served doing biotech and getting to work in the lab with the bacteria or being on a research team, or even just doing public health and working towards community outreach or something. I will say that if I do leave the program and realize later I want to do nursing , there are plenty of nice scrappy yet trustworthy community colleges in the area where I can get my ADN. And if I've learned anything in this program its that it really doesn't matter where you get your degree from.

Marie Nolan, executive vice dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore, said it has seen its biggest number of applicants ever, many of them applying even before a vaccine was available, despite her worries that COVID-19 would scare off students.

Students at those and other schools have been able to gain valuable hands-on experience during the pandemic, doing COVID-19 testing and contact tracing and working at community vaccination clinics.

"We've said to the students, 'This is a career opportunity that you'll never see again,'" Nolan said.

Champlain said that like many of her classmates, she saw the pandemic as a chance to learn critical-care skills and then apply them. And she is young and her immune system is fine, she said, "so the idea of getting the virus didn't scare me."

"It's just time for us to step in and give it our all and figure out how we can help, because there has to be a new generation and that's got to be us," the 21-year-old said.

Watch: Texas A&M's Jayden Peevy punches Bama's Brian Robinson

  Watch: Texas A&M's Jayden Peevy punches Bama's Brian Robinson Some defensive players use a swing like that when they’re trying to cause a fumble and knock the ball loose. But Peevy dove in so late and swung after Robinson was already down on the play that it made his punch attempt a dirty cheap shot.The officials did not see the move and did not call Peevy for a foul. But you can bet Alabama will see it upon reviewing the film and not be happy, especially considering some of the friction between Nick Saban and Jimbo Fisher.Subscribe to Yardbarker's Morning Bark, the most comprehensive newsletter in sports.

Some quit during the epidemic, but even more quit afterward, once the danger and the emergency were over. They were traumatized by what they had been through, by what society had put them through, by how they were treated by the government and the hospitals and their patients and by society in general, and they had absolutely nothing left to This is a big reason why I didn't go into the medical field. I would walk out and leave the patient there for someone else to deal with. I wasn't going to go to school /residency for over 8 years to have someone yell at me that science isn't real.

" Nursing programs are so selective," says Jaggars. "You can enroll in community college but you can't get into the nursing program until you demonstrate various prerequisites. They only have a limited number of spots." If students can't find a list of prerequisites on a school 's website, Jaggars suggests they call either the nursing program 's front desk or the advising center at the college. "Ask, 'If I complete all of these requirements, what are my chances of getting into the program if there is still a waiting list?'"

The higher enrollment could help ease a nursing shortage that existed even before COVID-19. But it has brought its own problems: The increase, combined with the departure of too many experienced nurses whose job is to help train students, has left many nursing programs without the ability to expand.

The rise is happening even as hospital leaders around the U.S. report that thousands of nurses have quit or retired during the outbreak, many of them exhausted and demoralized because of the pressure of caring for the dying, hostility from patients and families, and the frustration in knowing that many deaths were preventable by way of masks and vaccinations.

Eric Kumor saw many of his nursing colleagues from a COVID-19 unit in Lansing, Michigan, transfer or take other jobs this past spring when the pandemic's third wave began to hit. He followed them out the door in July.

"It was like this mass exodus. Everybody chose their own health and wellness over dealing with another wave," he said.

He said he plans on returning to health care someday, but for now he is working at a barbecue joint, where the worst thing that can happen is "burning a brisket."

Test-to-stay: Instead of quarantine for Covid-exposed students, some schools are trying testing

  Test-to-stay: Instead of quarantine for Covid-exposed students, some schools are trying testing For test-to-stay, if Covid-exposed students test negative and have no symptoms, they can continue going to school in person. If the exposed student tests positive, they must isolate at home. This approach is called test-to-stay, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now working with select school districts across the nation to evaluate the practice. Marietta City Schools told CNN that it originally implemented its test-to-stay program on its own; it's now one of the school districts in touch with the CDC as part of its evaluation process.

"I'm not done with nursing yet," he said.

Betty Jo Rocchio, chief nursing officer for Mercy Health, which runs hospitals and clinics in Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas and Oklahoma, said her system has about 8,500 nurses but is losing about 160 each month.

The departures are also taking their toll on nursing education, which relies on clinical instructors and preceptors, the experienced, hands-on nurses who mentor students on the job.

Nursing faculty is expected to shrink by 25 percent by 2025 across the country as nurses retire or leave because of burnout or other reasons, said Patricia Hurn, the nursing school dean at Michigan.

Mindy Schiebler, a cardiac nurse from Vancouver, Washington, taught nursing students for three years before quitting in 2016. She said she would love to still be teaching but that it's not workable financially. She said she knows nursing professors who work multiple jobs or dip into their retirement savings.

"How long can you subsidize your own job?" she asked. "Nurses will make double what you make in just a few years out of the gate."

Administrators said they would like to see more financial incentives such as tax breaks for instructors and preceptors. Rocchio said it would also help to have national licensing instead of state-by-state requirements, giving health systems more flexibility in training and hiring.

FDA says Pfizer vaccine appears to work in young kids; study shows lower mortality rates for vaccinated people: Live COVID updates

  FDA says Pfizer vaccine appears to work in young kids; study shows lower mortality rates for vaccinated people: Live COVID updates Pfizer’s COVID vaccine appears highly effective at preventing symptomatic infections in young kids and caused no unexpected safety issues, feds say.The Food and Drug Administration posted its analysis of Pfizer’s data ahead of a public meeting next week to debate whether the shots are ready for the nation’s roughly 28 million children ages 5 to 11. The agency will ask a panel of outside vaccine experts to vote on that question and is expected to authorize the vaccine for young children as early as next week.

Hurn said the pandemic has led to a new focus at her school on the mental health of students, leading to the creation of programs such as "Yoga on the Lawn."

"For nursing, you have to develop the skills to be resilient, to adapt to high-strain conditions," she said.

First year nursing student, Emma Champlin said that like many of her classmates, she saw the pandemic as a chance to learn critical-care skills and to help at a time when those abilities are needed. Champlin, poses for a photo in her clinical laboratory class at Fresno State on Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021, in Fresno, Calif. Gary Kazanjian/AP Photo © Gary Kazanjian/AP Photo First year nursing student, Emma Champlin said that like many of her classmates, she saw the pandemic as a chance to learn critical-care skills and to help at a time when those abilities are needed. Champlin, poses for a photo in her clinical laboratory class at Fresno State on Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021, in Fresno, Calif. Gary Kazanjian/AP Photo

Related Articles

  • Thousands of Public Servants Could Have Student Loans Forgiven After Lawsuit Settled
  • The 11 Biggest GoFundMe Fundraisers Ever
  • Watch: Healthcare Worker's Haunting 3am Piano Concert Reduces Listeners to Tears
  • Companies Hit By Worker Strikes in Recent Weeks, John Deere Latest Impacted
  • New Immunotherapy Treatment Brings Hope to Head and Neck Cancer Patients

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Mississippi State's Mike Leach has nothing but scorn for candy corn .
Considering the innovations Leach has made in football, maybe he’ll tackle innovations in the candy business upon retirement. Between this and the dating advice he’s offered, Leach is great when it comes to non-football topics.Subscribe to Yardbarker's Morning Bark, the most comprehensive newsletter in sports. Customize your email to get the latest news on your favorite sports, teams and schools. Emailed daily.

usr: 2
This is interesting!