•   
  •   
  •   

US Missouri Governor Goes After Reporter Who Found Teachers' Social Security Info Was at Risk

12:16  18 october  2021
12:16  18 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

LSU football lifts COVID-19 entrance protocols

  LSU football lifts COVID-19 entrance protocols Practically all virus-related restrictions for attending games are eliminated. Fans under the age of 12 no longer have to wear masks in outdoor spaces, but guests must still wear face coverings in the indoor portions of Tiger Stadium. "This is amazing progress," Dr. O’Neal added. "But the game is not over. This virus will surge again, and Louisiana must be prepared before it arrives yet again by getting vaccinated. The vaccines we have are safe and effective, and getting vaccinated is our best shot at defeating COVID-19."LSU says coronavirus hospitalizations in Louisiana have decreased by 80% over the past seven weeks.

Missouri Governor Mike Parson went after a reporter who discovered that Social Security information of teachers and school administrators was at risk of being publicly exposed on a state agency website.

Missouri Governor Mike Parson is going after a reporter who discovered a vulnerability of Social Security data on a state agency website. In this photo, Parson listens to a media question during a press conference on May 29, 2019 in Jefferson City. © Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images Missouri Governor Mike Parson is going after a reporter who discovered a vulnerability of Social Security data on a state agency website. In this photo, Parson listens to a media question during a press conference on May 29, 2019 in Jefferson City.

The St. Louis-Dispatch on Wednesday reported that it found the "vulnerability in a web application that allowed the public to search teacher certifications and credentials."

Watch: Jim Harbaugh snubs ESPN's Molly McGrath on postgame interview

  Watch: Jim Harbaugh snubs ESPN's Molly McGrath on postgame interview McGrath ended up interviewing Michigan quarterback Cade McNamara after the game instead. Harbaugh’s reason for avoiding the interview is unclear. Maybe he will argue that he thought he was just avoiding a fan or someone else on the field and did not realize it was ESPN’s reporter trying to interview him.That’s an unfortunate blemish for him despite his team improving to 6-0. Maybe he will end up apologizing like another famous head coach did.Subscribe to Yardbarker's Morning Bark, the most comprehensive newsletter in sports.

The newspaper notified the state's Department of Elementary and Secondary Education of the issue before publishing the story, and the affected pages were removed from the website.

"Based on state pay records and other data, more than 100,000 Social Security numbers were vulnerable," the St. Louis-Dispatch reported.

The private information wasn't clearly shown or searchable on the site, according to the newspaper, but Social Security numbers were in the HTML source code of the web pages. The St. Louis-Dispatch said it confirmed the vulnerability with three educators as well as a cybersecurity expert.

Parson, a Republican, responded to the story in a news conference Thursday, in which he referred to the reporter as a "hacker" and the actions of the newspaper "pathetic."

Missouri governor calls for prosecution of journalist who flagged website flaw

  Missouri governor calls for prosecution of journalist who flagged website flaw Missouri's governor has called for a criminal investigation into a local journalist who discovered a website vulnerability that exposed teachers’ Social Security Numbers.The journalist, Josh Renaud of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, published an article Wednesday about a vulnerability in the website of the state’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Viewing the HTML source code on the site revealed teachers’ names and their Social Security numbers, Renaud wrote, and he contacted three teachers to verify that the numbers were authentic.

The governor announced he referred the matter to the Cole County Prosecutor and has asked the Missouri State Highway Patrol to investigate. The probe could cost taxpayers as much as $50 million, according to Parson.

"This administration is standing up against any and all perpetrators who attempt to steal personal information and harm Missourians," the governor said. "It is unlawful to access encoded data and systems in order to examine other people's personal information."

Parson said nothing on the state website giving the reporter permission to access teacher data.

"This individual is not a victim," Parson said. "They were acting against the state agency to compromise teachers in an attempt to embarrass the state and sell headlines for their news outlet."

The governor also vowed to go after those who "aided and abetted" the reporter and the media corporation they work for.

Texas book controversy: School administrator told teachers to include Holocaust books with 'opposing' views when explaining new state law

  Texas book controversy: School administrator told teachers to include Holocaust books with 'opposing' views when explaining new state law A school district superintendent in North Texas apologized Thursday night after one of the district's administrators told teachers that if they have books about the Holocaust in their classroom libraries, then they should also include books that have "opposing" views of the Holocaust.At a training session last week, a school administrator with Carroll ISD in Southlake, Texas, tried to advise elementary school teachers on how to follow new district guidelines for the vetting of books. The guidelines were issued in an attempt to align with a controversial law in Texas that seeks to restrict discussion of race and history in schools.

Joe Martineau, an attorney for the newspaper, said in a statement that the reporter "did the responsible thing by reporting his findings to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) so that the state could act to prevent disclosure and misuse."

"A hacker is someone who subverts computer security with malicious or criminal intent. Here, there was no breach of any firewall or security and certainly no malicious intent. For DESE to deflect its failures by referring to this as 'hacking' is unfounded. Thankfully, these failures were discovered," Martineau said.

State Representative Crystal Quade, the Democratic Minority Leader, said Thursday Parson should be thanking the newspaper, not condemning it.

"The governor should direct his anger towards the failure of state governments to keep its technology secure and up to date and work to fix the problem, not threaten journalists with prosecution for uncovering those failures," Quade said in a statement.

Parson said Thursday that the state is working to "strengthen our security" so that the incident doesn't happen again.

Update 10/14/2021, 1:15 p.m. ET: This story has been updated to include comment from Joe Martineau, the attorney for the St. Louis-Dispatch.

Related Articles

  • Twitch Hacked as Creator Earnings Allegedly Released Online
  • Hackers May Have Had Access to Billions of Texts for Years, Global Telecom Company Admits
  • Facebook's Leaked Blacklist Features 9 Pro-Trump Militia Groups

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Panthers OC Joe Brady responds to speculation linking him to LSU opening .
The 32-year-old Brady had been generating plenty of buzz as a potential candidate for the LSU job, and it makes a lot of sense. After all, he rose to prominence as the passing game coordinator and wide receivers coach for the Tigers, helping lead them to the national title in 2019. Brady’s success working with players like Joe Burrow, Ja’Marr Chase and Justin Jefferson established him as one of the top young offensive minds in football. He even won the Broyles Award in 2019 as the best assistant in all of college football. Brady left LSU in 2020 to join Matt Rhule’s staff in Carolina.

usr: 4
This is interesting!