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US Amid the Capitol riot, Facebook faced its own insurrection

07:25  23 october  2021
07:25  23 october  2021 Source:   msn.com

Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger looks to put department on new trajectory

  Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger looks to put department on new trajectory Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger is determined to ensure his department is not defined by the Jan. 6 pro-Trump insurrection. Since taking over a department hemorrhaging officers, consumed by low morale and criticized over its handling of the Capitol attack, Manger has sought to put it on a new trajectory. He engages in ways […] The post Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger looks to put department on new trajectory appeared first on Roll Call.

6 riots . New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot . Facebook says the situation is more nuanced and that it carefully calibrates its controls to react quickly to spikes in hateful and violent content, as it did on Jan 6. The company said it ’ s not responsible for the actions of the rioters and that having stricter controls in place prior to that day wouldn’t have helped.

Research shows that Facebook ’s own page recommendations for this account evolved into a “very annoying polarization” within a day, and by the second day, the algorithm contained more than QAnon-linked groups. We recommended radical content. She was essentially unattractive to conspiracy theory, so fake users “When like-minded individuals come together and support each other to act, they are more likely to be at increased risk of offline violence and harm,” the study concludes. Invoices filed by federal prosecutors for allegedly assaulting the Capitol include examples of such like-minded people.

WASHINGTON (AP) — As supporters of Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6th, battling police and forcing lawmakers into hiding, an insurrection of a different kind was taking place inside the world’s largest social media company.

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump try to open a door of the U.S. Capitol as they riot in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump try to open a door of the U.S. Capitol as they riot in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) FILE - Former Facebook employee Frances Haugen speaks during a hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Data Security, on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 5, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Former Facebook employee Frances Haugen speaks during a hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Data Security, on Capitol Hill, on Oct. 5, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Thousands of miles away, in California, Facebook engineers were racing to tweak internal controls to slow the spread of misinformation and inciteful content. Emergency actions — some of which were rolled back after the 2020 election — included banning Trump, freezing comments in groups with a record for hate speech, filtering out the “Stop the Steal” rallying cry and empowering content moderators to act more assertively by labeling the U.S. a “Temporary High Risk Location" for political violence.

Risky business: Some Capitol riot defendants forgo lawyers

  Risky business: Some Capitol riot defendants forgo lawyers Some of the defendants charged in the storming of the U.S. Capitol are turning away defense lawyers and electing to represent themselves, undeterred by their lack of legal training or repeated warnings from judges. That choice already has led to some curious legal maneuvers and awkward exchanges in court. A New York man charged in the Jan. 6 insurrection wants to bill the government for working on his own case. A Pennsylvania restaurant owner is trying to defend herself from jail. A judge told another New Yorker that he may have incriminated himself during courtroom arguments.

6. R: A prospective FBI agent removes glass from a Capitol window. More and more elements appear to undermine the controversial qualification of armed insurrection given by the Democrats to the peaceful demonstration carried out by citizens demanding electoral integrity in front of the Capitol on Jan. Earlier, the same @Gekko_WynV had attached to another of his tweets a video of renowned anchor Tucker Carlson, in which he implicated undercover FBI agents in the riots that occurred on Capitol Hill.

Alleged Capitol rioters are still being arrested four months after the insurrection . Key Points. Suspects in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continue to face arrest as the Justice Department ramps up its probe. At least three supporters of former President Donald Trump were arrested as recently as Monday and charged with federal crimes related to the riot , according to court records.

FILE - U.S. Capitol Police officers push back rioters who were trying to break into the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - U.S. Capitol Police officers push back rioters who were trying to break into the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

At the same time, frustration inside Facebook erupted over what some saw as the company's halting and inconsistent response to rising extremism in the U.S.

“Haven’t we had enough time to figure out how to manage discourse without enabling violence?” one employee wrote on an internal message board at the height of the Jan. 6 turmoil. “We’ve been fueling this fire for a long time and we shouldn’t be surprised it’s now out of control.”

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New video of Capitol riot shown at insurrection hearing. Jenny Cudd, seen in this Facebook video, has been charged in connection with the US Capitol Hill riot and insurrection . He faces federal charges including unlawfully entering the Capitol , disrupting government business, violent entry The complaint says that Fracker, in his own social media post, acknowledged the photo of him inside the

Capitol riot live updates: Air Force veteran fired after reported participation. Trump promoted the protest for weeks in advance, promising on Dec. “The Town of Rocky Mount fully supports all lawful expressions of freedom of speech and assembly by its employees but does not condone the unlawful acts that occurred that day,” a news release said. About a dozen members of Black Lives Matter of Franklin County gathered outside the police department building after the announcement, The Roanoke Times reported.

It’s a question that still hangs over the company today, as Congress and regulators investigate Facebook’s part in the Jan. 6 riots.

New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot. It quickly became clear that even after years under the microscope for insufficiently policing its platform, the social network had missed how riot participants spent weeks vowing — on Facebook itself — to stop Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s election victory.

FILE - U.S. Capitol Police push back rioters who were trying to enter the U.S. Capitol on on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - U.S. Capitol Police push back rioters who were trying to enter the U.S. Capitol on on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

The documents also appear to bolster Haugen’s claim that Facebook put its growth and profits ahead of public safety, opening the clearest window yet into how Facebook’s conflicting impulses — to safeguard its business and protect democracy — clashed in the days and weeks leading up to the attempted Jan. 6 coup.

Amid the Capitol riot, Facebook faced its own insurrection

  Amid the Capitol riot, Facebook faced its own insurrection WASHINGTON (AP) — As supporters of Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6th, battling police and forcing lawmakers into hiding, an insurrection of a different kind was taking place inside the world’s largest social media company. Thousands of miles away, in California, Facebook engineers were racing to tweak internal controls to slow the spread of misinformation and inciteful content. Emergency actions — some of which were rolled back after the 2020 election — included banning Trump, freezing comments in groups with a record for hate speech, filtering out the “Stop the Steal” rallying cry and empowering content moderators to act more assertively by labeling the U

Her Facebook profile also revealed who her employer was, The Associated Press reported. On January 8, Vinson said she was fired from Ascension St. Vincent hospital in Evansville, Indiana. She claims paperwork said she was fired for admitting to engaging in criminal behaviour at a high-profile event. Ascension St. Vincent said in a statement it “cannot comment on specific employment matters”. The FBI also contacted Ms Vinson relating to her being at the Capitol during the riot after she was fired. She said she had a 10-minute conversation and the agent thanked her, saying: “You won’t

An armed insurrection is a leader pointing his army at the Capitol , and tanks driving up the steps and smashing through the doors. Rifle-wielding troops following up in its wake. A coup d'etat would be Donald Trump pulling on his military fatigues and taking to the airwaves, sitting at the Even Trump's own side waded in. Take failed one-time Republican candidate for the presidency Mitt Romney, who said as the riot unfolded: “What happened here today was an insurrection , incited by the president of the United States.” American chat show hosts also had their say, with Jimmy Kimmel inviting viewers

This story is based in part on disclosures Haugen made to the Securities and Exchange Commission and provided to Congress in redacted form by Haugen’s legal counsel. The redacted versions received by Congress were obtained by a consortium of news organizations, including The Associated Press.

What Facebook called “Break the Glass” emergency measures put in place on Jan. 6 were essentially a toolkit of options designed to stem the spread of dangerous or violent content that the social network had first used in the run-up to the bitter 2020 election. As many as 22 of those measures were rolled back at some point after the election, according to an internal spreadsheet analyzing the company's response.

In this image from U.S. Capitol Police security video, police and rioters are seen in the Rotunda of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot. (U.S. Capitol Police via AP) © Provided by Associated Press In this image from U.S. Capitol Police security video, police and rioters are seen in the Rotunda of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. New internal documents provided by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen provide a rare glimpse into how the company, after years under the microscope for the policing of its platform, appears to have simply stumbled into the Jan. 6 riot. (U.S. Capitol Police via AP)

“As soon as the election was over, they turned them back off or they changed the settings back to what they were before, to prioritize growth over safety,” Haugen said in an interview with “60 Minutes.”

Amid the Capitol riot, Facebook faced its own insurrection

  Amid the Capitol riot, Facebook faced its own insurrection WASHINGTON (AP) — As supporters of Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6th, battling police and forcing lawmakers into hiding, an insurrection of a different kind was taking place inside the world’s largest social media company. Thousands of miles away, in California, Facebook engineers were racing to tweak internal controls to slow the spread of misinformation and inciteful content. Emergency actions — some of which were rolled back after the 2020 election — included banning Trump, freezing comments in groups with a record for hate speech, filtering out the “Stop the Steal” rallying cry and empowering content moderators to act more assertively by labeling the U

An internal Facebook report following Jan. 6, previously reported by BuzzFeed, faulted the company for having a “piecemeal” approach to the rapid growth of “Stop the Steal” pages, related misinformation sources, and violent and inciteful comments.

Facebook says the situation is more nuanced and that it carefully calibrates its controls to react quickly to spikes in hateful and violent content, as it did on Jan 6. The company said it’s not responsible for the actions of the rioters and that having stricter controls in place prior to that day wouldn’t have helped.

Facebook’s decisions to phase certain safety measures in or out took into account signals from the Facebook platform as well as information from law enforcement, said spokeswoman Dani Lever. “When those signals changed, so did the measures.”

Lever said some of the measures stayed in place well into February and others remain active today.

Some employees were unhappy with Facebook's managing of problematic content even before the Jan. 6 riots. One employee who departed the company in 2020 left a long note charging that promising new tools, backed by strong research, were being constrained by Facebook for “fears of public and policy stakeholder responses” (translation: concerns about negative reactions from Trump allies and investors).

What Was Leaked in the Facebook Papers?

  What Was Leaked in the Facebook Papers? A guide to the newly reported revelations from a trove of internal company documents shared by a company whistleblower.In 2019 and 2020, a researcher at Facebook created fictitious user accounts on the platform in order to test how the company’s recommendation systems fed misinformation and polarizing content. One test user, created in the summer of 2019, was a conservative mother named Carol Smith from North Carolina who expressed an interest in politics, parenting, and Christianity. Within two days, Facebook was already recommending QAnon groups to the woman. That continued even after the test user did not follow the suggested groups.

“Similarly (though even more concerning), I’ve seen already built & functioning safeguards being rolled back for the same reasons,” wrote the employee, whose name is blacked out.

Research conducted by Facebook well before the 2020 campaign left little doubt that its algorithm could pose a serious danger of spreading misinformation and potentially radicalizing users.

One 2019 study, entitled “Carol’s Journey to QAnon—A Test User Study of Misinfo & Polarization Risks Encountered through Recommendation Systems,” described results of an experiment conducted with a test account established to reflect the views of a prototypical “strong conservative” — but not extremist — 41-year North Carolina woman. This test account, using the fake name Carol Smith, indicated a preference for mainstream news sources like Fox News, followed humor groups that mocked liberals, embraced Christianity and was a fan of Melania Trump.

Within a single day, page recommendations for this account generated by Facebook itself had evolved to a "quite troubling, polarizing state,” the study found. By day 2, the algorithm was recommending more extremist content, including a QAnon-linked group, which the fake user didn’t join because she wasn't innately drawn to conspiracy theories.

A week later the test subject's feed featured “a barrage of extreme, conspiratorial and graphic content,” including posts reviving the false Obama birther lie and linking the Clintons to the murder of a former Arkansas state senator. Much of the content was pushed by dubious groups run from abroad or by administrators with a track record for violating Facebook’s rules on bot activity.

‘History Will Not Judge Us Kindly’

  ‘History Will Not Judge Us Kindly’ Thousands of pages of internal documents offer the clearest picture yet of how Facebook endangers American democracy—and show that the company’s own employees know it.At 2:10 p.m., a live microphone captured a Senate aide’s panicked warning that “protesters are in the building,” and both houses of Congress began evacuating.

Those results led the researcher, whose name was redacted by the whistleblower, to recommend safety measures running from removing content with known conspiracy references and disabling “top contributor” badges for misinformation commenters to lowering the threshold number of followers required before Facebook verifies a page administrator’s identity.

Among the other Facebook employees who read the research the response was almost universally supportive.

“Hey! This is such a thorough and well-outlined (and disturbing) study,” one user wrote, their name blacked out by the whistleblower. “Do you know of any concrete changes that came out of this?”

Facebook said the study was an one of many examples of its commitment to continually studying and improving its platform.

Another study turned over to congressional investigators, titled “Understanding the Dangers of Harmful Topic Communities,” discussed how like-minded individuals embracing a borderline topic or identity can form “echo chambers” for misinformation that normalizes harmful attitudes, spurs radicalization and can even provide a justification for violence.

Examples of such harmful communities include QAnon and, hate groups promoting theories of a race war.

“The risk of offline violence or harm becomes more likely when like-minded individuals come together and support one another to act,” the study concludes.

Charging documents filed by federal prosecutors against those alleged to have stormed the Capitol have examples of such like-minded people coming together.

Prosecutors say a reputed leader in the Oath Keepers militia group used Facebook to discuss forming an “alliance” and coordinating plans with another extremist group, the Proud Boys, ahead of the riot at the Capitol.

“We have decided to work together and shut this s—t down,” Kelly Meggs, described by authorities as the leader of the Florida chapter of the Oath Keepers, wrote on Facebook, according to court records.

The Facebook Papers: What's you need to know .
New documents -- The Facebook Papers -- are bringing more clarity to the social media giant's problems, and reinforcing a whistleblower's claim that the platform profited off the spread of false information and relies on an algorithm that pushes fake news like drugs. © Justin Sullivan/Getty Images The Facebook logo is displayed during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California.

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