•   
  •   
  •   

US Daughter learns mother dead after Tubbs Fire destroys mobile home park

02:20  12 october  2017
02:20  12 october  2017 Source:   sfchronicle.com

Wine Country fires: What we know, and what we don’t

  Wine Country fires: What we know, and what we don’t Fifteen wildfires in Northern California, many of them in the Wine Country, ravaged homes, businesses, vineyards and farmland Monday. Eleven people were confirmed dead and several others were severely burned. Major highways were shut down, and local officials requested help from around the region as Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency. Information from authorities and residents on the ground was developing throughout Monday. Officials said efforts were focused on saving people’s lives, so many details were not fully known.

The Journey's End mobile home park burns during a the Tubbs fire on Mendocino Avenue in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Daughter searches for mother after fires destroys mobile home .

Most of the mobile homes were destroyed in the blaze, except for the last row of homes Pool chairs are seen melted by the pool at Journey's End mobile home after the Tubbs fire tore through The Journey's End mobile home park burns during a the Tubbs fire on Mendocino Avenue in Santa

Jessica Tunis’s last conversation with her mother, who died in the Tubbs Fire, was terrifying.

Elderly couple found dead in their Napa condo — first local fire victims

  Elderly couple found dead in their Napa condo — first local fire victims Two elderly residents have been found dead in fire-ravaged Napa County and law enforcement officials said Tuesday they fear there will be others. Charles and Sara Rippey, 100 and 98, were found dead inside their condominium in the 100 block of Westgate Drive at the Silvarado Country Club. Officers found the couple Monday morning after receiving a call from a family member who feared for their safety. Both people suffered medical problems that made evacuation impossible, Napa County Sheriff John Robertson said following a press conference at the county command center Tuesday. Robertson declined to say what those medical issues were.

Aerial view of mobile home park , hotel destroyed in Tubbs Fire Elijah Nouvelage, Special to The Chronicle. Couple Drives Through Edge of Wildfire Devastating Yuba County Storyful.

Aerial view of mobile home park , hotel destroyed in Tubbs Fire Elijah Nouvelage, Special to The Chronicle. Oakland family of 7, stranded after mom’s death , back home . Fresno Chipotle manager gets M in lawsuit. MLB star who wondered if he's related to JFK learns the truth.

Linda Tunis, 69, called her daughter at 3:43 a.m. Monday as flames swept through her Santa Rosa mobile home park. She was screaming, Jessica Tunis said Wednesday.

“She called me saying she was trapped and everything was on fire,” Tunis recalled. “I said ‘Let someone see you!’ She’s coughing, coughing, coughing. I’m hearing the smoke alarm go off. I’m trying to help her navigate her house. I’m saying ‘Mom get out! Get out! Run!’”

That’s when the phone cut off.

“It was horrendous,” Tunis, 49, said.

She hadn’t heard from her since, and was holding out hope that somehow her mother had been rescued from her home in the Journey’s End Mobile Home Park on Mendocino Avenue in Santa Rosa’s Fountaingrove area.

On Wednesday afternoon, Tunis said her brother found their mother’s remains at her burned-down home.

Desperate families, friends cling to hope as they search for the missing

  Desperate families, friends cling to hope as they search for the missing It’s been nearly two days since the inferno known as the Tubbs Fire ripped through residential neighborhoods of Santa Rosa, leaving behind thousands of destroyed homes and nine fatalities. For the family of Christina Hanson, the fire also left an agonizing question: Where is she? It’s been nearly two days since the inferno known as the Tubbs Fire ripped through residential neighborhoods of Santa Rosa, leaving behind thousands of destroyed homes and nine fatalities.

Aerial view of mobile home park , hotel destroyed in Tubbs Fire Elijah Nouvelage, Special to The Chronicle. Couple Drives Through Edge of Wildfire Devastating Yuba County Storyful. Santa Rosa mobile home park destroyed by fire Gabrielle Lurie, San Francisco Chronicle.

Aerial view of mobile home park , hotel destroyed in Tubbs Fire Elijah Nouvelage, Special to The Chronicle. Santa Rosa mobile home park destroyed by fire Gabrielle Lurie, San Francisco Chronicle.

Linda Tunis was one of hundreds of people reported missing in the fires that have ravaged California’s Wine Country since late Sunday and continue to burn uncontrolled in Sonoma and Napa counties and beyond.

At least 21 people are confirmed dead from wildfires across California, 11 of them in Sonoma County, officials said Wednesday.

Jessica Tunis searched dozens of evacuation shelters and hospitals over the past three days with no sign of her mother, and her hopes began to fade.

Linda Tunis settled into the senior mobile home park in January after moving from West Palm Beach, Fla., to be closer to her family. She had health issues, including a failing memory following a stroke and high blood pressure that took her sight in one eye.

Her daughter had been checking in regularly with her, and was concerned when she saw the flames from the Tubbs Fire.

Jessica Tunis manages a senior property in Rincon Valley and had been warning the 44 residents there that they may need to evacuate. The flames sat on a nearby ridge and the wind grew so intense it snapped her patio umbrellas.

She unaware what was happening farther away at her mother’s mobile home park until her phone rang.

“I was telling her I love her when the phone died,” she said.

Evan Sernoffsky is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: esernoffsky@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @EvanSernoffsky

A tranquil street is left a wasteland overnight .
When she'd gone to bed Sunday night, the fires ravaging Northern California had seemed miles away from Santa Rosa, but something woke Julie Pilacelli around 1 a.m. and told her to slip on her robe and go outside. As she stood in the middle of Hemlock Street, where she had lived for 21 years, she smelled smoke and felt a breeze and a sinking feeling. "Something told me," she said. "Death. Go. Leave now." Within an hour, the L-shaped street lined with more than 40 ranch-style homes was overwhelmed by wildfire. In the sky, fireballs exploded like popcorn. Embers crashed onto bushes, rooftops and windshields.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!