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World Pandas, U.F.O.s and Other Curiosities from Britain’s National Archives

18:50  30 december  2017
18:50  30 december  2017 Source:   nytimes.com

Europe Forges a New Defense Club — and the U.K. Isn't Invited

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LONDON — The sporadic release of documents from Britain ’ s National Archives gives a glimpse into the country’ s inner workings. For instance, there was the revelation that Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher debated using the military to quell a miners’ strike in 1984.

Pandas , U . F . O . s and Other Curiosities from Britain ’ s National Archives : Thatcher refused to take panda to Washington in Concorde, papers The National Archives on Friday released a new batch of documents, mostly from 1994, that tell of internet anxiety at the prime minister’ s office, Margaret

Margaret Thatcher et al. standing in front of a wedding cake: Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Ronald Reagan in the Oval Office in 1981. © Associated Press Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Ronald Reagan in the Oval Office in 1981.

LONDON — The sporadic release of documents from Britain’s National Archives gives a glimpse into the country’s inner workings. For instance, there was the revelation that Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher debated using the military to quell a miners’ strike in 1984.

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The archives are a repository of both the historical and the mundane, storing everything from Shakespeare’s will to countless government tweets.

And then there are the more offbeat offerings: Britons learned on Friday, in the government’s latest release, about Mrs. Thatcher’s refusal to travel with a panda. Previous released included disclosures about leftover moon dust (found in a cupboard), a report concerning U.F.O.’s (there were none) and Princess Margaret’s hoped-for marriage (no government opposition).

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The sporadic release of documents from Britain ’ s National Archives gives a glimpse into the country’ s inner workings. For instance, there was the revelation that Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher debated using the military to quell a miners’ strike in 1984.

Pandas UFOs and Other Curiosities from Britains National Archives . News To Day Read.

Here are some of the quirkiest revelations from recent years.

No Panda on Thatcher’s Concorde

“I’m not taking a panda with me,” Mrs. Thatcher scribbled on a memo about the financial struggles of London Zoo. “Pandas and politicians are not happy omens!”

The note came after the president of the zoo, Lord Zuckerman, contacted Mrs. Thatcher through a cabinet minister with a plea for financial help. Lord Zuckerman proposed that Mrs. Thatcher take a panda “in the back of her Concorde” on her first visit with President Ronald Reagan.

The trip would have been a chance for the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington to borrow London’s male panda to mate with its female panda. But Mrs. Thatcher was having none of it.

Moon Dust in Downing Street Cupboard

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Saturday, 30 December 2017. Pandas , U . F . O . s and Other Curiosities from Britain ’ s National Archives . Blog Archive .

Pandas , U . F . O . s and Other Curiosities from Britain ’ s National Archives . British government memos, tweets and other documents find their way to the National Archives , with some released each year.

When America’s Apollo 11 astronauts returned to Earth, they brought with them 48 pounds of rocks from the moon’s surface. President Richard M. Nixon presented Harold Wilson, the prime minister, with a sampling during a meeting in Washington in 1970.

The four tiny pebbles mounted on an a commemorative wooden plaque first went on loan to the Science Museum in London, but as successive prime ministers struggled to find an appropriate spot to display it, the gift languished in a cupboard for years.

Security concerns, about U.F.O.s

Files from other departments, like the Ministry of Defense, provide interesting details about Britain’s security concerns through the past century, including those involving unidentified flying objects.

The ministry received drawings, reports of sightings and questions from concerned citizens over several decades, papers released in several batches through the National Archives showed.

British navy escorts Russian warship near UK waters

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The National Archives holds other UFO files that have already been released by the Ministry of Defence. You can download these in PDF format for a small fee. Download the iPhone/iPad app UFO Files UK, created by Black Plaques in association with The National Archives , and explore the

We are a non-ministerial department, and the official archive and publisher for the UK Government, and for England and Wales. Sign me up to The National Archives ' mailing list. Subscribe now for regular news, updates and priority booking for events.

“No U.F.O./flying saucer has landed in the vicinity of Menwith Hill and the base had no connection with U.F.O. research,” the ministry once replied to local farmers who reported sighting a disc-shaped object.

The U.F.O. files are available for browsing on the National Archives website.

A Royal Wedding That Never Was

Anthony Eden, who briefly served as prime minister in the 1950s, did not seem poised to stand in the way of a potential marriage between Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth II’s sister, and Group Capt. Peter Townsend. Even as the royal family was navigating what it would mean for Princess Margaret, then third in line for the throne, to wed Mr. Townsend, who was divorced, the government was coming up with plans to support the marriage.

Mr. Eden’s government would have allowed Princess Margaret to keep her royal title.

“The government was looking for ways of enabling her to marry,” an official at the National Archives told the BBC after government papers were released after the death of the princess.

A Merger With France?

When Prime Minister Guy Mollet of France visited Britain during the Suez Crisis in 1956, he had a surprising suggestion, according to papers from the National Archives seen by the BBC in 2007. He proposed a union between the two countries.

JFK files: House panel suspicious of KGB defector

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Pandas , U . F . O . s and Other Curiosities from Britain ’ s National Archives – British government memos, tweets and other documents find their way to the National Archives , with some released Dad Believed in U . F . O . s . Turns Out He Wasn’t Alone.–My father and the Pentagon seemed to agree.

Records in other archives and organisations. Records held locally. The National Archives ’ catalogue has details of collections held by over 2,500 archives Other resources. Websites. Read the article on Unidentified Flying Objects ( UFOs ) on Your Archives . Books. Visit The National Archives ’ bookshop

Later, when Mr. Eden was in Paris, Mr. Mollet reiterated the proposal and said that France would be happy to join the Commonwealth.

The documents had been declassified years before, but, the BBC said, nobody noticed them until 2007.

A Joke for Posterity

A suggestion to relocate Hong Kong residents after the territory’s return to China, in 1997, once inadvertently reached the Foreign Office.

A Belfast newspaper published the proposal, by a lecturer in Northern Ireland, that the population be moved to a theoretical city-state to be created in Magilligan, between Coleraine and Londonderry. The piece provoked a flurry of correspondence between an official in Northern Ireland and one in Britain’s Foreign Office.

But the Foreign Office official told the BBC it had been nothing more than a joke between colleagues.

“Sadly, it’s impossible to make jokes like this any more,” the official, by then retired, told the BBC when the correspondence was revealed. “The Diplomatic Service has lost its sense of humor.”

UK says would not be sensible to rescind Trump visit invitation .
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