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World French President Macron's approval rating falls below 50 percent: Ifop

04:46  18 february  2018
04:46  18 february  2018 Source:   reuters.com

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PARIS (Reuters) - French President Emmanuel Macron ’ s approval rating has fallen below 50 percent to its lowest level since October last year, a poll 7-17 survey by pollster Ifop for the weekly Le Journal du Dimanche newspaper, 44 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with Macron

French President Emmanuel Macron ’ s approval rating has fallen below 50 percent to its lowest level since October last year, a poll showed on Sunday, as 7-17 survey by pollster Ifop for the weekly Le Journal du Dimanche newspaper, 44 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with Macron

a man holding a box: French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech to members of France's Chinese community to mark Chinese New Year, at the Elysee Palace in Paris, © REUTERS/Ian Langsdon/Pool French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech to members of France's Chinese community to mark Chinese New Year, at the Elysee Palace in Paris, French President Emmanuel Macron's approval rating has fallen below 50 percent to its lowest level since October last year, a poll showed on Sunday, as the government pushes ahead with plans to shake up France's costly civil service.

In a Feb. 7-17 survey by pollster Ifop for the weekly Le Journal du Dimanche newspaper, 44 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with Macron, down 6 points from Ifop's previous poll in January.

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PARIS (Reuters) – French President Emmanuel Macron ’ s approval rating has fallen below 50 percent to its lowest level since October last year, a poll 7-17 survey by pollster Ifop for the weekly Le Journal du Dimanche newspaper, 44 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with Macron

PARIS: French President Emmanuel Macron ’ s approval rating has fallen below 50 percent to its lowest level since October last year, a poll 7-17 survey by pollster Ifop for the weekly Le Journal du Dimanche newspaper, 44 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with Macron , down 6

It was the lowest approval rating for Macron since October, when it stood at 42 percent.

The government announced plans in early February to modernize the public administration in a country with one of the highest public spending ratios in the world.

Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said the government would have no qualms about making changes in the public sector, even if it encounters resistance. His budget minister Gerald Darmanin also said a voluntary redundancy plan for government employees could be a possible move.

(Reporting by Maya Nikolaeva; Editing by Hugh Lawson)

Americans say Congress is listening to all the wrong people .
Looking for common ground with your neighbor these days? Try switching subjects from the weather to Congress. Chances are, you both agree it's terrible. Load Error In red, blue or purple states, in middle America or on the coasts, most Americans loathe the nation's legislature. One big reason: Most think lawmakers are listening to all the wrong people, suggests a new study by researchers at Stanford University and the University of California-Santa Barbara with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

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