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World British military scientists can't prove that the nerve agent used to poison Sergei Skripal was made in Russia

21:13  03 april  2018
21:13  03 april  2018 Source:   businessinsider.com

Russia spied on Skripal and daughter for at least 5 years -UK

  Russia spied on Skripal and daughter for at least 5 years -UK Russia's intelligence agencies spied on former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia for at least five years before they were attacked with a nerve agent in March, the national security adviser to Britain's prime minister said.Load Error

Accusations and recriminations between Britain and Russia are set to escalate with the news that scientists at the Porton Down military research facility have been unable to establish exactly where the novichok nerve agent used to carry out the Skripal attack was manufactured.

British military scientists reportedly have not verified that the nerve agent used to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal was made in Russia — but said it was "only in the capabilities of a state actor." Gary Aitkenhead, chief executive at Porton Down, the UK Ministry of Defence' s science lab, told Sky News

hazmat sergei skripal: <p>Military personnel investigating the Skripal attack wear protective suits in Salisbury, England, on March 11.</p><p></p> © Provided by Business Insider

Military personnel investigating the Skripal attack wear protective suits in Salisbury, England, on March 11.

British military scientists reportedly have not verified that the nerve agent used to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal was made in Russia — but said it was "only in the capabilities of a state actor."

Gary Aitkenhead, chief executive at Porton Down, the UK Ministry of Defence's science lab, told Sky News on Tuesday that investigators have identified the poison to be military-grade Novichok, which was designed in Russia during the Cold War, but "have not verified the precise source" of it.

Poisoned Yulia Skripal has been discharged from British hospital-BBC

  Poisoned Yulia Skripal has been discharged from British hospital-BBC Yulia Skripal has been discharged from a British hospital, the BBC reported on Tuesday, just over a month after being poisoned with a nerve agent along with her father Sergei, a former Russian double agent. The Skripals were found unconscious on a bench on March 4 in the southern English city of Salisbury and they were in a critical condition for weeks until their health began to improve rapidly.Britain says they were poisoned with a military-grade nerve agent and has blamed Russia for the attack. Moscow has denied any involvement in the incident which has plunged its relations with the West to a post-Cold War low.

British military scientists reportedly have not verified that the nerve agent used to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal was made in Russia — but said it was "only in the capabilities of a state actor." Gary Aitkenhead, chief executive at Porton Down, the UK Ministry of Defence' s science lab

British military scientists were able to identify the nerve agent used to poison former spy Sergei Skripal as Novichok. Novichok is a military -grade poison designed in Russia during the Cold War. Gary Aitkenhead, chief executive at Porton Down, the UK ministry of Defence’ s science lab has

He noted that Porton Down was responsible for identifying the nerve agent and providing scientific information to the government, but not for concluding where the poison was made.

He said: "It is our job to provide the scientific evidence of what this particular nerve agent is, we identified that it is from this particular family and that it is a military grade, but it is not our job to say where it was manufactured."

However, Aitkenhead added that Novichok required "extremely sophisticated methods to create, something only in the capabilities of a state actor."

Theresa May accused Russia of being involved in the attempted assassination three weeks ago. 

"Either this was a direct act by the Russian state against our country, or the Russian government lost control of its potentially catastrophically damaging nerve agent and allowed it to get into the hands of others," she said.

UK mulls Russian request for access to Yulia Skripal

  UK mulls Russian request for access to Yulia Skripal Britain said Saturday it was considering Moscow's request for consular access to Yulia Skripal, the daughter of a former Russian spy targeted in a nerve agent attack. Sergei Skripal and his daughter have been in hospital since March 4 after being poisoned in an attack in Britain that London and its major Western allies blame on Russia.The first use of chemical weapons in Europe since World War II has chilled Moscow's relations with the West.The Foreign Office said that in reaching its decision, it would take into account whether Yulia Skripal wanted Russian officials to pay her a visit in hospital.

British military scientists reportedly have not verified that the nerve agent used to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal was made in Russia — but said it was "only in the capabilities of a state actor." Gary Aitkenhead, chief executive at Porton Down, the UK Ministry of Defence' s science lab

military scientists identified the nerve agent used to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal was Novichok, but have not verified where exactly it was made . Gary Aitkenhead, chief executive at Porton Down, told Sky News it was “not our job” to specify the source of the poison . However, he said that Novichok

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said at the time that there was insufficient evidence to conclude that Russia was culpable.

However, more than 20 other countries have agreed with May's assessment, and expelled more than 100 Russian diplomats from their countries in a show of solidarity.

Russia, meanwhile, has denied all responsibility of the attack.

Chemical watchdog to meet over spy nerve agent claims .
The world's chemical watchdog is to meet behind closed doors Wednesday, after a British laboratory said it had not proved that Russia manufactured a deadly nerve agent used to poison a former Russian spy. The talks at the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) have been requested by Moscow which said it wanted to "address the situation around the allegations... in regards to the incident in Salisbury.""We hope to discuss the whole matter and call on Britain to provide every possible element of evidence they might have in their hands," Russia's ambassador to Ireland, Yury Filatov, told reporters.

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