•   
  •   
  •   

World South Korea's Moon urges North, United States to move forward on ending nuclear program

08:40  13 july  2018
08:40  13 july  2018 Source:   reuters.com

Trump: We'd be at war with North Korea if it wasn't for me

  Trump: We'd be at war with North Korea if it wasn't for me <p>President Trump's tweet follows reports that U.S. officials believe North Korea has increased production of fuel for nuclear weapons.</p>"Many good conversations with North Korea-it is going well! In the meantime, no Rocket Launches or Nuclear Testing in 8 months. All of Asia is thrilled. Only the Opposition Party, which includes the Fake News, is complaining. If not for me, we would now be at War with North Korea!" Trump wrote on Twitter.

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday urged North Korea and the United States to move forward on a pact to end Pyongyang’ s nuclear program , as a lack of firm steps by the North raised questions about its commitment to its pledge.

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday urged North Korea and the United States to move forward on a pact to end Pyongyang’ s nuclear programme . “If Chairman Kim (Jong Un) keeps the promise of denuclearisation, he will be able to lead his country into prosperity

Moon Jae-in wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: South Korea's President Moon Jae-in speaks at the ISEAS 42nd Singapore Lecture in Singapore © REUTERS/Edgar Su South Korea's President Moon Jae-in speaks at the ISEAS 42nd Singapore Lecture in Singapore

South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday urged North Korea and the United States to move forward on a pact to end Pyongyang's nuclear program, as a lack of firm steps by the North raised questions about its commitment to its pledge.

"If Chairman Kim (Jong Un) keeps the promise of denuclearization, he will be able to lead his country into prosperity," Moon said in a speech during a visit to Singapore.

"This path is never easy, but if the agreements at the summit are implemented with sincerity, the goal can be achieved," he added, referring to Kim's historic meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump in the city state a month ago.

As Pompeo heads to North Korea, State Department denies softening

  As Pompeo heads to North Korea, State Department denies softening The State Department on Thursday denied that the United States had softened its approach toward North Korean denuclearization, as U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo heads to Pyongyang hoping to agree a roadmap for its nuclear disarmament. "Nothing could be further from the truth. Our policy toward North Korea has not changed," State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert told reporters on the way to Pyongyang."We are committed to a denuclearized North Korea and Secretary Pompeo looks forward to continuing his consultations with North Korean leaders to follow up on the commitments made at the Singapore summit," she added.

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday urged North Korea and the United States to move forward on a pact to end Pyongyang' s nuclear program .

SEOUL, South Korea — The leaders of North and South Korea agreed on Friday to work to remove all nuclear weapons from the Korean Peninsula and, within the year, pursue talks with the United States to declare an official end to the Korean War, which ravaged the peninsula from 1950 to 1953.

a man standing in front of a mirror: South Korea's President Moon Jae-in speaks at the ISEAS 42nd Singapore Lecture in Singapore © REUTERS/Edgar Su South Korea's President Moon Jae-in speaks at the ISEAS 42nd Singapore Lecture in Singapore

"If North Korea gives more substance on the implementation of denuclearization, and if South Korea and the United States quickly take comprehensive corresponding measures, the whole process will accelerate."

At the summit, the two leaders pledged to work towards complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and ease tension between their countries, still technically at war, since the 1950-53 Korean War ended in a truce, not a peace treaty.

Since the June 12 meeting, however, Pyongyang has yet to show any sign of concrete action to dismantle its nuclear program that has brought a series of U.N. and international sanctions against the impoverished state.

As Pompeo visits Pyongyang, South Korea quietly watches — and worries

  As Pompeo visits Pyongyang, South Korea quietly watches — and worries Officials in Seoul keep quiet about the secretary of state’s visit to North Korea.For South Korean President Moon Jae-in, there is real reason to worry. A prominent advocate for U.S.-North Korea talks, the soft-spoken South Korean leader played a pivotal role in bringing the brash Trump and the once-reclusive Kim Jong Un together for last month’s historic summit.

U . S . President Donald Trump met with North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un on June 12, 2018, in Singapore, in the first summit meeting between the leaders of the United States of America and

SEOUL, South Korea — Keeping diplomatic developments coming at a head-snapping pace, the South Korean government said on Sunday that North Korea ’ s leader, Kim Jong-un, had told President Moon Jae-in that he would abandon his nuclear weapons if the United States agreed to formally end

But Trump on Thursday hailed "great progress" after disclosing a July 6 note from Kim in which the North's leader said their efforts could open up a "new future" for the two countries.

Moon said he believed Trump and Kim would eventually make good on the promise made before the international community.

"If the leaders do not honor the promise they themselves made with the international community watching, they will be subject to grave judgment," he said.

South Korea is willing to build an economic community with its neighbor once the effort to root out Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions is completed, Moon said.

(Reporting by Jack Kim; Writing by Aradhana Aravindan; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

North Korea's economy just had its worst year in two decades .
South Korea's central bank estimates that the North's economy shrank by 3.5% in 2017 -- its weakest performance in two decades.Load Error

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!