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World North Korea is continuing to produce nuclear bomb fuel - Pompeo

00:11  26 july  2018
00:11  26 july  2018 Source:   reuters.com

North, South Korea Restore Military Communication Line

  North, South Korea Restore Military Communication Line South Korea said the move "will contribute substantially to the alleviation of military tensions and the building of trust between the two Koreas."The South Korean Defense Ministry announced Tuesday that an inter-Korean military communication line on the Yellow Sea—referred to locally as the West Sea—was again operational after being suspended during heightened tensions in 2016.

continuing to produce fissile material for nuclear bombs in spite of its pledge to denuclearize, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Wednesday. Asked at a Senate committee hearing whether this was the case, Pompeo responded to Democratic Senator Ed Markey by saying: “Yes, that’s

WASHINGTON (AFP) – North Korea is still making nuclear material, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told lawmakers on Wednesday (July 25), six weeks after President Donald Trump said the nuclear threat from Pyongyang was over.

PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 20, 2018. DigitalGlobe overview imagery of Punggye-ri, the North Korea nuclear test site. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images) © Getty PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 20, 2018. DigitalGlobe overview imagery of Punggye-ri, the North Korea nuclear test site. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images) North Korea is continuing to produce fissile material for nuclear bombs in spite of its pledge to denuclearize, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Wednesday.

Asked at a Senate committee hearing whether this was the case, Pompeo responded to Democratic Senator Ed Markey by saying: "Yes, that's correct ... yes, they continue to produce fissile material."

Pompeo declined to respond when asked whether North Korea was continuing to pursue submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

(Reporting by David Brunnstrom and Lesley Wroughton; editing by Jonathan Oatis)

Kim vs. Trump: North Korea's leaders have never kept their word on nukes. Here's what the US should do now .
You don’t need a Ph.D. in foreign relations to figure out North Korea’s long-term strategy or intentions. In fact, despite Kim’s smiles and handshakes when he met with President Trump, the North Koreans love to tell us what they are going to do before they do it.Unfortunately, American presidents, members of Congress and top policymakers – both Democrats and Republicans – haven’t been listening most of the time, going back to the end of the Korean War in 1953.So I wasn’t shocked at all at the story in The Washington Post. Kim told us what he was going to do in his New Year’s Address on Jan. 1.

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