•   
  •   
  •   

World U.S. report: Greenhouse gases surge to new highs worldwide in 2017

21:56  01 august  2018
21:56  01 august  2018 Source:   msn.com

California vs. Trump 'will be a giant case' over air rules, could end up in Supreme Court

  California vs. Trump 'will be a giant case' over air rules, could end up in Supreme Court WASHINGTON - California and like-minded states are girding for a legal battle with the Trump administration on whether those states have gone too far in controlling greenhouse gases from automobiles, a prospective case that legal scholars say - barring a last-minute settlement - is sure to reach the U.S. Supreme Court. The Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies are expected to announce, as soon as this week, a rollback of national fuel economy standards for vehicles. They could also revoke California's ability to set its own, tougher, air pollution limits.

AFP Photo. Planet-warming greenhouse gases surged to new highs as abnormally hot temperatures swept the globe and ice melted at record The annual State of the Climate Report , compiled by more than 450 scientists from over 60 countries, describes worsening climate conditions worldwide in 2017

Planet-warming greenhouse gases surged to new highs as abnormally hot temperatures swept the globe and ice melted at record levels in the Arctic last year due to climate change, a major US report said Wednesday. The annual State of the Climate Report

A handout photo provided by the European Geosciences Union on September 13, 2016 shows an undated photo of a polar bear testing the strength of thin sea ice in the Arctic: A polar bear tests the strength of thin sea ice in the Arctic. © Provided by AFP A polar bear tests the strength of thin sea ice in the Arctic.

Planet-warming greenhouse gases surged to new highs as abnormally hot temperatures swept the globe and ice melted at record levels in the Arctic last year due to climate change, a major U.S. report said Wednesday.

The annual State of the Climate Report, compiled by more than 450 scientists from over 60 countries, describes worsening climate conditions worldwide in 2017, the same year that U.S. President Donald Trump pulled out of the landmark Paris climate deal.

The United States is the world's second leading polluter after China, but has rolled back environmental safeguards under Trump, who has declared climate change a "Chinese hoax" and exited the Paris deal signed by more than 190 nations as a path toward curbing harmful emissions.

Sun's Activity Was Far More Intense Before Planets Formed

  Sun's Activity Was Far More Intense Before Planets Formed Scientists analyzed a mineral that formed in the proximity of a newborn sun, some 4.5 billion years ago.A team of researchers exploring an ancient meteorite has discovered that the heart of our solar system, the sun, was much more explosive than today when it came to life some 4.6 billion years ago.

Trends in Global Emissions. Source: Boden, T.A., Marland, G., and Andres, R.J. ( 2017 ). To learn more about past and projected global emissions of non-CO2 gases , please see the EPA report , Global Anthropogenic Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions: 1990-2020.

A greenhouse gas is a gas in an atmosphere that absorbs and emits radiant energy within the thermal infrared range. This process is the fundamental cause of the greenhouse effect.

The 300-page report issued by the American Meteorological Society and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) mentioned the word "abnormal" a dozen times, referring to storms, droughts, scorching temperatures and record low ice cover in the Arctic.

Here are its key findings:

Greenhouse gas surge 

Last year, the top three most dangerous greenhouse gases released into Earth's atmosphere -— carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide -— reached new record highs.

The annual global average carbon dioxide concentration at the Earth's surface climbed to 405 parts per million, "the highest in the modern atmospheric measurement record and in ice core records dating back as far as 800,000 years," said the report.

White House to propose weaker auto emissions rules, overriding California

  White House to propose weaker auto emissions rules, overriding California The Trump administration on Thursday will move to revoke California's authority to set its own strict tailpipe emissions rules and mandate the sale of electric vehicles, as it proposes weakening Obama-era federal fuel efficiency standards.The proposal to roll back anti-pollution efforts, to be released early on Thursday according to one administration official, is in line with President Donald Trump's decision last year to abandon the 2015 Paris deal aimed at slowing climate change.

If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot. This annual report estimates the total national greenhouse gas emissions and removals associated with human activities across the United States.

Atmospheric methane reached a new high of about 1 853 parts per billion (ppb) in 2016 and is now 257% of the pre-industrial level. Nitrous Oxide. ( 2017 , October 30). Greenhouse gas concentrations surge to new record.

"The global growth rate of CO2 has nearly quadrupled since the early 1960s."

Heat records 

The record for the hottest year in modern times was set in 2016, but 2017 was not far behind, with "much-warmer-than-average conditions" across most of the world, it said.

Annual record high temperatures were observed in Argentina, Bulgaria, Spain and Uruguay, while Mexico "broke its annual record for the fourth consecutive year."

Smashing more heat records, temperatures reached 110.1 degrees Fahrenheit (43.4 Celsius) on January 27 at Puerto Madryn, Argentina, "the highest temperature ever recorded so far south anywhere in the world."

The world's highest temperature ever for May was observed on May 28 in Turbat, western Pakistan, with a high of 128.3 degrees Fahrenheit.

"The 10 warmest years on record have all occurred since 1998, with the four warmest years occurring since 2014," said the report.

Heatwaves May Make China Unlivable Says Study

  Heatwaves May Make China Unlivable Says Study The heat could be so unbearable, that humans may die within six hours.A study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has found that soaring temperatures will make the North China Plain, which spans 35 million acres from Beijing to Shanghai, uninhabitable by the end of the century.

The summer monsoon in the deserts of the southwestern U . S . is known for bringing torrents of water, often filling dry stream beds and flooding urban streets. Greenhouse gases surge to new highs worldwide in 2017 : US report .

Home Media Press Releases Greenhouse gas concentrations surge to new record. 30 October 2017 . Together, the Greenhouse Gas Bulletin and Emissions Gap Report provide a scientific base for decision-making at the UN climate change negotiations, which will be held from 7-17 November in

Last year marked either the second or third hottest since the mid-1800s, depending on which data is consulted.

In another alarming milestone, 2017 was also "the warmest non-El Nino year in the instrumental record," referring to the absence of the occasional ocean warming trend that pushes temperatures higher than normal.

Abnormal Arctic 

Unprecedented heat enveloped the Arctic, where land surface temperature was 2.9 degrees Fahrenheit (1.6 Celsius) above the 1981–2010 average.

Arctic temperatures were the second highest, after 2016, since records began in 1900.

"Today's abnormally warm Arctic air and sea surface temperatures have not been observed in the last 2,000 years," it said.

And glaciers across the world shrank for the 38th year in a row.

"Cumulatively since 1980, this loss is equivalent to slicing 22 meters off the top of the average glacier," said the report.

In the Antarctic, sea ice extent remained below average all year, with record lows observed during the first four months.

Record sea level 

Global sea level reached record high in 2017 for the sixth consecutive year.

California's deadly wildfires to be major focus of attention as Legislature returns to work

  California's deadly wildfires to be major focus of attention as Legislature returns to work A thin layer of smoke has stretched across Sacramento for the past week, coming from the deadly wildfires burning to the north and east. The smoke serves as a powerful reminder of a topic likely to dominate the work of lawmakers returning to the state Capitol this week."We're in uncharted territory," Gov. Jerry Brown said last week after a briefing by state emergency officials. "Since civilization emerged 10,000 years ago, we haven't this kind of heat condition and it's going to continue getting worse."What awaits the Legislature, which adjourns for the year on Aug.

These gases are typically emitted in smaller quantities, but because they are potent greenhouse gases , they are sometimes referred to as High Global Warming Potential gases (" High GWP gases ").

China, which is responsible for one-quarter of the world ’ s industrial greenhouse gases , saw its emissions rise 1.7 percent in 2017 , fueled by rapid Last year’ s emissions increase was the equivalent of adding 170 million new cars worldwide . CreditHarish Tyagi/European Pressphoto Agency.

The world's average sea level is now three inches (7.7 centimeters) higher than in 1993.

"I think of the oceans like a freight train," oceanographer Gregory Johnson from NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory told reporters.

"If we were to freeze greenhouse gases at the level they are today, the oceans would continue to warm and seas would continue to rise for centuries to millennia."

Extreme rain 

Precipitation in 2017 "was clearly above the long-term average," said the report.

Warmer ocean temperatures has led to increasing moisture in the air, particularly in the last three years, causing more rain.

Climate change can also exacerbate extreme weather.

Some parts of the world suffered extended droughts, demonstrating that "extreme precipitation is not evenly distributed across the globe."

'Most destructive' coral bleaching 

Ocean warming over the last few years has been blamed for widespread coral bleaching, as disease spreads in this precious habitat for fish and marine life.

"The most recent global coral bleaching lasted three full years, June 2014 to May 2017, and was the longest, most widespread and almost certainly most destructive such event on record," said the report.

California gas company to pay nearly $120 million for methane leak .
A $119.5 million settlement announced Wednesday of claims stemming from the Aliso Canyon gas leak marks the biggest action yet to deal with the health effects and climate damage of the largest release of methane in U.S. history. The deal between Southern California Gas Co. and city, county and state officials and prosecutors will fund a long-sought health study and numerous environmental measures intended to offset the damage caused by the leak.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!