•   
  •   
  •   

World Tunisia feared the return of militants from abroad. The threat now is those who never left.

20:43  08 september  2018
20:43  08 september  2018 Source:   msn.com

Trump admin may send captured ISIS fighters to Iraq prison, Guantanamo

  Trump admin may send captured ISIS fighters to Iraq prison, Guantanamo The possible Guantanamo detainees include two ISIS fighters who participated in the murder of Americans and other Western hostages, say U.S. officials.The possible Guantanamo detainees include two ISIS fighters who participated in the murder of Americans and other Western hostages, say five U.S. officials. Alexandar Amon Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh were members of a group of four jihadis dubbed "The Beatles" by observers because of their British accents.

The threat now is those who never left . Kasserine is an impoverished city in western Tunisia , where the high unemployment rate and the lack of The continuing local recruitment of militants highlights the challenges facing Tunisia , the only nation to emerge as a democracy after the 2011 populist

The threat now is those who never left . Add to list. The continuing local recruitment of militants highlights the challenges facing Tunisia , the only nation to emerge as a democracy after the 2011 populist revolts across the region that became known as the Arab Spring.

Kasserine is an impoverished city in western Tunisia, where the high unemployment rate and the lack of opportunities for young people have made it a recruiting area for the Islamic State and al-Qaeda.© Lorenzo Tugnoli/for The Washington Post Kasserine is an impoverished city in western Tunisia, where the high unemployment rate and the lack of opportunities for young people have made it a recruiting area for the Islamic State and al-Qaeda.

TUNIS —Four years ago, thousands of Tunisian jihadists began flowing to the battlefields of Iraq, Libya and Syria to join the Islamic State and al-Qaeda — more than from any other nationality. Ever since, Tunisian and Western authorities have feared their return and the possible chaos that could follow.

So far, those fears haven’t materialized, according to Tunisian authorities, Western diplomats and regional analysts.

Uganda's pop star MP rearrested seeking treatment abroad

  Uganda's pop star MP rearrested seeking treatment abroad Ugandan singer-turned-politician Robert Kyagulanyi, better known as Bobi Wine, was being held at a government hospital Friday after being rearrested while attempting to seek medical treatment abroad. Kyagulanyi -- who faces treason charges alongside 32 others after President Yoweri Museveni's car window was allegedly broken by a tossed stone -- was released on bail on Monday but seized by police Thursday evening at Entebbe airport, outside the capital Kampala.

The threat now is those who never left . Kasserine is an impoverished city in western Tunisia , where the high unemployment rate and Frustration over Ever since, Tunisian and Western authorities have feared their return and the possible chaos that could follow. So far, those fears haven’t materialized

The threat now is those who never left . The continuing local recruitment of militants highlights the challenges facing Tunisia , the only nation to emerge as a democracy after the 2011 populist revolts across the region that became known as the Arab Spring.

Instead, the Islamic State and al-Qaeda are recruiting a new generation of locals to stage terrorist attacks at home, including one last month near the Algerian border that killed six national guardsmen.

Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post

“This is primarily homegrown,” said Matt Herbert, a partner at Maharbal, a Tunis-based security consulting firm. “The majority of Tunisians who survived Libya and Syria have not returned.”

The continuing local recruitment of militants highlights the challenges facing Tunisia, the only nation to emerge as a democracy after the 2011 populist revolts across the region that became known as the Arab Spring. Although the ideological appeal of the Islamic State and al-Qaeda appears to have shrunk in many parts of the country, diplomats and analysts say a post-revolution era of political, economic and social turmoil is still breeding resentment, especially among Tunisia’s youth.

One dead, many feared trapped in Kolkata bridge collapse

  One dead, many feared trapped in Kolkata bridge collapse At least one person has died and several others are feared trapped in India's eastern city of Kolkata after a section of a decades-old highway bridge built over a railway track collapsed. The incident in Majherhat, southern Kolkata, took place at around 11:30 GMT on Tuesday, when a nearly 30-metre long section of the bridge dropped to the ground, the second such incident in the city in less than three years.More than two dozen people were injured and rushed to local hospitals, police said.

The Washington Post, “ Tunisia feared the return of militants from abroad . The threat now is those who never left ,” 08 September 2018. Mar 2, 2019 Dates that Algerian Terrorists Became Involved in Militancy : Information on 249 Terrorists Killed, Captured, or Surrendered Mar 2, 2019.

Four years ago, thousands of Tunisian jihadists began flowing to the battlefields of Iraq, Libya and Syria to join the Islamic State and al-Qaeda — more than The threat now is those who never left - the Islamic State (ISIS) and al-Qaeda (AQ) are recruiting a new generation of locals to stage terrorist

Frustration over a lack of economic opportunities and social mobility has driven more than 3,000 Tunisians to leave for Europe this year, more than from any other nationality, according to the United Nations’ migration agency. These same factors have caused others to join extremist groups, especially in areas long neglected by the government.

“Socioeconomic crises are the best fuel either for illegal migration or, in worst-case scenarios, for feeding terrorism,” said Patrice Bergamini, the European Union’s ambassador to Tunisia.

Much of the recruitment is taking place in Tunisia’s impoverished southwestern mountains along the border with Algeria. Both the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, the terrorist network’s branch in North and West Africa, have affiliates operating along the border.

Although the extremists are said to be mostly Tunisians, they also include Algerians, West Africans and Libyans, regional analysts said. Only about 15 to 20 Tunisians are thought to be returnees from Libya and Syria, they added.

Father-of-two who was deported after living in the US for almost 30 years forced to rebuild his life in Mexico while his family live just 20 miles away in the US

  Father-of-two who was deported after living in the US for almost 30 years forced to rebuild his life in Mexico while his family live just 20 miles away in the US Father-of-two Gaston Cazares was forced to rebuild his life after being deported in September 2017. His family remain in San Diego but under current immigration law he cannot visit them.A father-of-two has had to rebuild his life in Mexico after he was deported after almost 30 years in the United States.

[ Tunisia feared the return of militants from abroad . The threat now is those who never left .] Kuwaiti Emir Sheikh Sabah Ahmed al-Sabah, left , and Saudi Arabia's King Salman, center, listen to Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi, right, during a group photo session May 30 ahead of an Arab

News Tunisia » Jendouba » Education: Tunisia feared return of militants from abroad . The threat now is those who never left . From the October suicide bombing in central Tunis , to an ISIS-claimed attack on a security patrol last week at Kasserine, close to the Algerian border, the threat of terrorism

At least 5,500 Tunisians traveled in recent years to Iraq, Libya and Syria to join the Islamic State and al-Qaeda, according to U.N. estimates.

Many of the Tunisians who went to Libya died in late 2016 in the fight to retake Sirte, the capital of the Islamic State’s so-called caliphate in North Africa, and in the battle for the Tunisian border town of Ben Guerdane, analysts said.

And many of the extremists who went to Syria and Iraq are thought to have died fighting there. Survivors of those battles are thought to be among a pocket of Islamic State militants holding out in eastern Syria or to be in Syrian prisons. Some are probably in hiding. Others slipped away to Libya to join the Islamic State affiliate there, or may have joined a branch in Egypt’s northern Sinai Peninsula.

As many as 800 fighters have returned to Tunisia, and the vast majority of them are incarcerated around the country.

The extremists now active in Tunisia, some analysts say, are using the country as a staging ground for attacks on Algeria, which has fought a long confrontation with al-Qaeda and, more recently, a new Islamic State branch.

San Diego area college evacuates after 'credible threat'

  San Diego area college evacuates after 'credible threat' A community college near San Diego is evacuating its main campus and nearby college branches because of what campus police call a "credible threat."Campus police were investigating the threat at about 8 a.m. and did not disclose information about the nature of the threat or how it was made, said Ernest Rivera, a spokesman for Southwestern College, which has a main campus in the city of Chula Vista and three other locations in neighboring communities.

News Tunisia » Jendouba » Economy: Tunisia feared the return of militants from abroad . The threat now is those who never left .

News Tunisia » Jendouba » History: Tunisia feared the return of militants from abroad . The threat now is those who never left . The continuing local recruitment of militants highlights the challenges facing Tunisia , the only nation to emerge as a were on patrol in a remote mountainous patch near

“Tunisia is the land of recruitment,” said Michael Bechir Ayari, Tunisia senior analyst for the International Crisis Group.

Others say Tunisia itself remains a target because of the government’s relatively liberal views on Islam, women and freedom of expression.

In 2015, Tunisian gunmen with the Islamic State attacked the resort town of Sousse and the famed Bardo Museum in the capital, killing scores of people, mostly foreign tourists. The following year, more Tunisians belonging to the Islamic State entered from Libya and tried to seize Ben Guerdane before Tunisian security forces repelled them.

Since then, the Islamic State and al-Qaeda have carried out more attacks in Tunisia, but none as catastrophic. Today, an estimated 200 militants belonging to either the Islamic State or al-Qaeda are operating in the mountains, although the number of sympathizers is unknown, analysts said.

The attack last month near the Algerian border illustrated the militants’ continuing ambitions. The national guard vehicles were on patrol in a remote, mountainous patch near the town of Jendouba when the militants, hidden in the bush, threw a grenade and a gunfight ensued.

“It was a treacherous ambush,” said Omar Benaissi, a top local official in Ghardimaou, the impoverished region where the attack happened. “The six were killed in the moment the attack happened.”

Trump expecting to receive letter from North Korea's Kim

  Trump expecting to receive letter from North Korea's Kim President Donald Trump says he's expecting get a letter in the coming days that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is sending him through Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Trump tells reporters traveling with him on Air Force One that Kim's recent overtures amount to "a very positive statement what he said about me and also what he said about he wants to denuclearize during the Trump administration.

News Tunisia » Jendouba » Security: Tunisia feared the return of militants from abroad . The threat now is those who never left .

TUNIS — Tunisia has sent more fighters abroad to join the ranks of the Islamic State than any other country. And now , as the Islamic State takes a battering on the battlefields of Syria and Iraq, the country is at odds over what to do if and when they come home.

Residents and officials suspected that the militants may have been tipped off to the convoy by local supporters. Al-Qaeda’s local branch asserted responsibility for the attack, which analysts say was intended to show that the militants are still a force and to use for recruitment.

“The groups still operating out there in the mountains out west have a lot of skill,” Herbert said. “They seem to have grown in size over the past couple of years. They have a lot of resilience to withstanding Tunisian attempts to end this conflict.”

Hatem Hwawi, a teacher and blogger in Jendouba, said most of the local residents lead hardscrabble lives and resent the government, making them susceptible to militant appeals.

“They are miserable and can be easily recruited by the terrorists,” he said. “The Tunisian authorities are creating a fertile soil for terrorists, either by marginalizing the security forces or marginalizing the people economically.”

Hwawi, who said he helped carry the wounded soldiers into the hospital, described them as ill-equipped, with guns and shoes in poor condition.

Tunisian authorities say they have made progress in tackling the local militancy, noting the decrease in attacks nationwide. The United States has provided tens of millions of dollars to enhance security on the Libyan border.

Security analysts give high marks to the nation’s U.S.-trained counterterrorism forces for gathering intelligence and for penetrating and dismantling cells. But the analysts are concerned about non-elite forces, such as the police and border guards, who have less training and are more corruptible.

Analysts also are increasingly concerned about the potential for radicalization in Tunisia’s prisons, where many extremists are kept in cells with common criminals.

“It is definitely a worry, since there is a huge population of individuals in overcrowded prisons planning their next strategic moves for whenever they are released from prison,” said Aaron Zelin, an expert on jihadist groups with the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and author of a forthcoming book on the history of Tunisian jihadism.

The Tunisian state, he added, does not have adequate rehabilitation or reintegration programs for former militants. “So it is likely if they are released, they would just revert back to their old ways with ISIS or al-Qaeda, depending on their affiliation when they went in.”

sudarsan.raghavan@washpost.com

President Trump and aides caught on tape laughing about Niger terrorist ambush that left four U.S. soldiers dead .
President Trump made light of a terrorist ambush in Niger that left four U.S. soldiers dead last year, drawing laughs from some of his aides as he joked about what a “rough business” terrorism is, according to a covert recording released Monday. Trump made the comments during a closed-door staff meeting at the White House in the wake of the Oct. 4, 2017 attack on the U.S. soldiers, who were advising local troops fighting Islamic militants in the area. Former White House communications aide Omarosa Manigault Newman secretly recorded the conversation and provided a tape of it to MSNBC on Monday.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!