World: Taiwan appoints new Premier amid rising China tensions - PressFrom - US
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WorldTaiwan appoints new Premier amid rising China tensions

11:20  11 january  2019
11:20  11 january  2019 Source:   cnn.com

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(L-R) Former premier William Lai, Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen and new premier Su Tseng-chang join hands after a news conference in Taipei Tsai appointed Su Tseng-chang, a two-term former chairman of her Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), saying Taiwan faced challenges amid rising

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan 's president on Tuesday appointed a new premier seen as willing to reach out to rival China amid ongoing tense relations between the two sides.

Taiwan appoints new Premier amid rising China tensions© AP In this image made from video, newly appointed Taiwan's Premier Su Tseng-chang, right, speaks next to Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen during a press conference at the presidential office in Taipei, Taiwan, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019.

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen on Friday appointed a senior figure from her pro-independence ruling party as the island's new Premier amid growing tensions with China.

Su Tseng-chang, 71, a former chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), was chosen to replace William Lai after the party suffered a bruising defeat in local elections last November.

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TAIPEI, Taiwan – Taiwan 's president has appointed a new premier seen as willing to reach out to rival China amid ongoing tense relations. President Tsai Ing-wen on Tuesday named William Lai to head up the government following the resignation Monday of Lin Chuan. Lin had asked to leave the

The Taiwanese army held joint drills with the air force on Tuesday to enhance combat readiness ahead of the Lunar New Year. The drill simulated an attack on

Lai formally resigned earlier Friday, along with the entire Cabinet, taking responsibility for the party's losses. Tsai also resigned as DPP leader following the elections, though she remains president.

"Premier Su has three strengths that Taiwan needs at the moment: experience, vigor and the ability to execute (policies)," she said in a speech at the Presidential Palace Friday.

Tsai is facing mounting pressure both at home -- where her progressive reform agenda has faced setbacks -- and from across the Taiwan Strait.

Last week, Chinese President Xi Jinping called on Taiwan to reject moves towards formal independence and embrace "peaceful reunification" with his country, suggesting the island adopt the concept of "one country, two systems" as used in Hong Kong when China regained sovereignty over the city from the UK in 1997.

Taiwan to appoint new premier after incumbent, Cabinet quit over poll defeats

Taiwan to appoint new premier after incumbent, Cabinet quit over poll defeats Taiwan will appoint the ruling pro-independence party's former chairman as premier, official media reported on Friday, a day after incumbent William Lai said he was resigning along with the entire Cabinet in response to local election defeats. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The election losses in November presented a major challenge to President Tsai Ing-wen, who came under mounting criticism at home over her reform agenda while facing renewed threats from China, which considers Taiwan its own.

(5 Sep 2017) Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen named William Lai as the country's new premier on Tuesday following the resignation of Lin Chuan. Lai is seen as willing to reach out to China amid ongoing tensions . Earlier this year he suggested seeking common ground with China and said the

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan 's president on Tuesday appointed a new premier seen as willing to reach out to rival China amid ongoing tense relations between the two sides.

While his speech sounded more conciliatory than previously, Xi did not rule out using military force to take Taiwan. In the past he has vowed not to cede "a single inch of our motherland," and increased military drills around the self-ruled and democratic island of 23 million people.

Tsai rejected Xi's "one country, two systems" suggestion outright, and on Friday she emphasized that Taiwan's priorities in 2019 include protecting its democracy and safeguarding its sovereignty, in addition to improving people's livelihoods.

She acknowledged the challenges ahead as Taiwan, whose economy is closely linked to that of China, tackles the fallout of the trade war between Washington and Beijing, as well as renewed fears of Xi's hardline stance.

China and Taiwan -- officially the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China, respectively -- split in 1949 following the Communist victory on the mainland after a bloody civil war.

They have been governed separately ever since although a shared cultural and linguistic heritage largely endures, with Mandarin the official language in both places.

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