World: Global condemnation, condolences after mosque attack - PressFrom - US
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WorldGlobal condemnation, condolences after mosque attack

15:51  15 march  2019
15:51  15 march  2019 Source:   msn.com

Canadian man behind mosque massacre appeals sentence: reports

Canadian man behind mosque massacre appeals sentence: reports A Canadian man sentenced to 40 years in prison without the possibility of parole for the killing of six worshippers at a Quebec mosque in January 2017 has launched an appeal, local media reported Friday. Alexandre Bissonnette was convicted on February 8 to life imprisonment for the murders, the deadliest attack on a Muslim place of worship in the West. On January 29 2017, Bissonette opened fire on around 40 men and four children who were chatting after prayers in the grand hall of the ground floor, killing six men and seriously wounding five others.

International condemnation . Leaders around the world condemned the mosque attack . US President Donald Trump called it a "horrible and cowardly UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said he was deeply saddened by the "abhorrent attack ." "My sincere condolences to all those affected by such a

The Quebec City mosque shooting (French: Attentat de la grande mosquée de Québec) was a terrorist attack and mass shooting on the evening of January 29, 2017

Global condemnation, condolences after mosque attack© The Associated Press Police attempt to move people away from outside a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019. Multiple people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques full of worshippers attending Friday prayers on what the prime minister called "one of New Zealand's darkest days," as authorities detained four people and defused explosive devices in what appeared to be a carefully planned attack. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

BRUSSELS — World leaders expressed condolences and condemnation Friday following the deadly attacks on mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while Muslim leaders said the mass shooting was evidence of a rising tide of violent anti-Islam sentiment.

Shots fired at New Zealand mosque, some casualties, witness tells media

Shots fired at New Zealand mosque, some casualties, witness tells media New Zealand police deployed armed officers in central Christchurch on Friday after reports that several shots had been fired, police said, and witnesses at a mosque told media of several casualties. People in center of the city should stay indoors, police said. Police officials did not immediately comment on whether the incident took place in the mosque or nearby. There is no official confirmation on casualties. Media said shots had been fired near a mosque and a witness told broadcaster One News that he had seen three people lying on the ground, bleeding outside the building.

Global development. “On behalf of the UK, my deepest condolences to the people of New Zealand after the horrifying terrorist attack in Christchurch.” “I strongly condemn the terror attack against the Al Noor Mosque in New Zealand and Muslim worshippers,” said Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip

Suspected militants attacked a crowded mosque during a Friday sermon in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, setting off bombs, opening fire on worshippers and killing at least 235 in the deadliest ever attack on Egyptian civilians by Islamic militants, the official MENA news agency reported.

In a tweet, U.S. President Donald Trump sent "warmest sympathy and best wishes" to the people of New Zealand.

He wrote that "49 innocent people have so senselessly died, with so many more seriously injured. The U.S. stands by New Zealand for anything we can do. God bless all!"

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called the attacks the "latest example of rising racism and Islamophobia."

New Zealand police said at least 49 people were killed Friday at two mosques in the picturesque South Island city. More than 20 were seriously wounded in what Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern called a "terrorist attack."

One man was arrested and charged with murder in what appeared to be a carefully planned racist attack. Police also defused explosive devices in a car. Two other people were being held in custody and police were trying to determine how they might be involved.

Christchurch gunman live-streamed his attack in 17-minute Facebook video

Christchurch gunman live-streamed his attack in 17-minute Facebook video A gunman who opened fire inside a New Zealand mosque on Friday live-streamed his attack in a 17-minute video.

Reactions to the September 11 attacks included condemnation from world leaders, other political and religious representatives and the international media

Scores more wounded when al-Rawdah mosque in north Sinai bombed and fleeing worshippers gunned down.

Speaking at the funeral of a former minister, Erdogan said the anti-Islam hatred that motivated the attacks "has rapidly started to take over Western communities like a cancer."

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan echoed Erdogan.

Slideshow by photo services

"I blame these increasing terror attacks on the current Islamophobia post-9/11 where Islam & 1.3 bn Muslims have collectively been blamed for any act of terror by a Muslim," he wrote in a tweet.

The secretary-general of the 57-nation Organization of Islamic Cooperation, Youssef al-Othaimeen, said in a statement that the attack "served as a further warning on the obvious dangers of hate, intolerance, and Islamophobia."

Queen Elizabeth II, who is New Zealand's head of state, said in a message to the country she was "deeply saddened by the appalling events in Christchurch" and sent condolences to families and friends of victims. The queen also paid tribute to emergency services and volunteers supporting the injured.

"At this tragic time, my thoughts and prayers are with all New Zealanders," she said in her message.

Chelsea Clinton confronted at NYU vigil for mosque victims over her remarks about Omar

Chelsea Clinton confronted at NYU vigil for mosque victims over her remarks about Omar Chelsea Clinton received an earful in New York City on Friday night from a college student who said the former first daughter "stoked" the hatred behind the massacre earlier in the day in Christchurch, New Zealand. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); It happened at a vigil on the New York University campus for the 49 people killed and dozens of others wounded in the attack. “I’m so sorry that you feel that way,” Clinton responded. “Certainly, it was never my intention. I do believe words matter.

The charges came hours after the attack at the Québec City Islamic cultural center, also known as the Grande Mosquée de Québec, during evening The brazen attack left the tight-knit Muslim community in Québec City reeling. Many had been awake all night waiting for details of the shooting to trickle in.

Trumps contrasting reactions to the two attacks have raised questions about how the identities of the suspects and victims informs the President's response.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker tweeted that he learned of the attack "with horror and profound sadness."

"The European Union will always stand with #NewZealand and against those who heinously want to destroy our societies and our way of life," he wrote.

In France, home to western Europe's largest Muslim community, Interior Minister Christophe Castaner ordered regional authorities to bolster security at mosques as a precaution.

London's mayor, Sadiq Khan, said the city's Metropolitan Police force would be visible outside mosques.

"London stands with the people of Christchurch in the face of this horrific terror attack," he said. "London will always celebrate the diversity that some seek to destroy."

London mosques have been targeted in the past. One man died and several others were injured in 2017 when Darren Osborne drove a van into people leaving evening prayers. Prosecutors say Osborne was motivated by a hatred of Muslims and far-right propaganda he found online.

In Iran, foreign ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi condemned the attack and urged New Zealand authorities to bring to justice those who carried out the "racist, inhumane and barbaric" attacks.

Anwar Gargash, the United Arab Emirates' minister of state for foreign affairs, tweeted, "heartfelt condolences" to New Zealand.

"Our collective work against violence & hate must continue with renewed vigor. Our thoughts & prayers are with the families of the victims," Gargash wrote.

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas extended his country's sympathies to the friends and families of the victims of the attack.

"The horrific terrorist attack in Christchurch targeted peacefully praying Muslims — if people are murdered solely because of their religion, that is an attack on all of us," he said.

A telegram of condolences sent by the Vatican on behalf of Pope Francis said he was "deeply saddened to learn of the injury and loss of life cause by the senseless acts of violence at two mosques in Christchurch, and he assures all New Zealanders, and in particular the Muslim community, of his heartfelt solidarity in the wake of these attacks."

Ardern says royal commission will investigate mosque attacks.
New Zealand's prime minister has announced a top-level inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the massacre of 50 people in two Christchurch mosques. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says the country's highest form of investigation, a royal commission of inquiry, was appropriate for "matters of the gravest public importance." Her Cabinet had previously agreed on holding an inquiry, but had not decided what kind of investigation would be held. She said the Cabinet agreed Monday a royal commission of inquiry "will look at what could have or should have been done to prevent the attack.

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