World: Thousands of Brits have made a home in France. Brexit could complicate their lives. - - PressFrom - US
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WorldThousands of Brits have made a home in France. Brexit could complicate their lives.

11:40  08 april  2019
11:40  08 april  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

There is now a 40% chance of Brexit being scrapped, says Goldman Sachs

There is now a 40% chance of Brexit being scrapped, says Goldman Sachs It puts the odds of the dreaded no-deal Brexit at just 15%.

Brexit could complicate their lives . The Washington Post 4/7/2019 Quentin Ariès. © Mehdi Fedouach/AFP/Getty Images A child wearing a British nationals in Europe could soon be sent home . Each E.U. country has established its own plan for how to treat resident Brits in the event of a

Brexit could complicate their lives . A child wearing a British soccer jersey and his father walk near Place d'Eymet in June 2016 in the Dordogne region of Over the years, more than 14,000 Brits have made a home for themselves in this corner of France , and their presence is everywhere.

Thousands of Brits have made a home in France. Brexit could complicate their lives.© Mehdi Fedouach/AFP/Getty Images A child wearing a British soccer jersey and his father walk near Place d'Eymet in June 2016 in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, where a large population of British expatriates live.

HUELGOAT, France —Sarah Waddington had enough of Britain after the Brexit referendum.

By September 2016, she had packed up her life in Cornwall, sold her house and moved to Brittany, a coastal region in northwestern France.

“I love France,” said Waddington, 66, a retired civil servant. “They are more community oriented, more caring. They care more for their elderly than in England.”

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Brexit could complicate their lives . A child wearing a British soccer jersey and his father walk near Place d'Eymet in June 2016 in the Dordogne region Thousands of Britons have made a home in France - Brexit could complicate their lives . Some Brits said they had been waiting for months to

Brexit - British exit - refers to the UK leaving the EU. Some fear this could lead to traffic bottlenecks, disruption to supply routes and damage to the economy. Many Brexit supporters say it is hard to accurately predict what will happen, or believe any economic disruption will be short-term and minor.

Over the years, more than 14,000 Brits have made a home for themselves in this corner of France, and their presence is everywhere. They’ve rehabbed old granite houses, opened small shops and become active in chess clubs and other community organizations. In this village, expatriate David Neal runs the Brittany Pub, where an order of fish and chips can momentarily transport you over the English Channel.

But British citizens here and elsewhere on the continent have suddenly found themselves consumed by uncertainty. If Prime Minister Theresa May can’t convince European leaders to grant another Brexit extension this week, then Britain is scheduled to crash out of the European Union without a withdrawal deal on April 12. British nationals in Europe could soon be sent home.

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Retirees living in southwest France fear their healthcare and state pensions will be in danger if Britain votes to leave the EU on June 23rd. France 24’s Claire Williams and Alix Le Bourdon went to the Lot to meet members of the local British community.

Brexit campaigners say “well, Brits used to live in France before the EU”, which is true but it was only the stinking rich. Of course they could stay in France , they Britons would also lose the right to vote in French local elections as is their right as EU citizens. Remember also that many British people are

Each E.U. country has established its own plan for how to treat resident Brits in the event of a no-deal Brexit. In 11 of the 27 member countries, British citizens would automatically be allowed to stay as long as they like. But in 17 countries, they would only get a grace period before they would need to try to claim residency. In France, they would have up to a year to get their papers in order, or face losing their medical coverage and potentially deportation.

Of the dozens of British expatriates in Brittany who spoke with The Washington Post, most said they wished to stay in France as long as they could. Many had been in touch with French authorities to obtain a permanent residency card.

Christina Jones, 71, said it took six weeks for her and her husband to get their “cartes de séjour” and that they are thinking of applying for French citizenship.

“We have a good life here,” she said. Though she noted that the aftermath of the 2016 Brexit referendum was difficult for many expats. “Our family doctor, six months after the referendum, told me dozens of Brits were going to her with depression.”

Brexit Enters the ‘Flextension’ Era. It Could Be Short.

Brexit Enters the ‘Flextension’ Era. It Could Be Short. LONDON — After months of tortured debate over Britain’s departure from the European Union, a new word has entered the jargon-strewn Brexit lexicon: “flextension.” It could hold the key to the next phase. Flextension is how insiders are describing the type of delay to Brexit that Prime Minister Theresa May now seems likely to seek from the bloc: a long extension that could be cut short if Parliament finally approves an exit deal. If it sounds dubious, it is nevertheless considered an improvement on an earlier term for the process, “terminability.” Sign Up For the Morning Briefing Newsletter Whatever it is called, analysts are far from sure that Mrs.

Good weather, great food, and solid health coverage - for decades Brits have hopped across the channel to make their lives in France . But a Brexit could

Home . Britons could find their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) - a passport to emergency medical treatment - is no longer valid in some EU countries. Britons living in France will have their rights protected for a one-year transitional period, and will have to apply for a residence permit in the

With just days before Britain could crash out, the stress of Brexit has intensified.

Some Brits told The Post they had been waiting for months to get an answer from French authorities about their residency applications, while others were told they should wait to start the process only if Britain leaves without a deal. The French prefecture of Quimper, in charge of processing applications for the Huelgoat area, declined to comment for this story.

Another point of concern: the decreased value of the British pound. Since June 2016, the British currency has dropped relative to the euro. One pound sterling went from 1.28 euros to 1.17 euros. This has been tough for British residents in France, as many are retirees with British pensions as their sole source of income. If the pound sinks even more after Brexit, some residents fear they could fall below the French poverty line.

Sylvie Mayer, 60, a real estate agent in Huelgoat, said she has already felt the Brexit effect, with fewer Brits looking to buy homes in Brittany. Before the summer of 2016, 80 percent of her clients were British. Now, only half are.

Maud Camus, 33, works at the Huelgoat cafe La Paillotte, where she said about 40 percent of the clientele are British. Imagining a future where Brexit makes it difficult for Brits to live in France, she said, “If they were not here, this place would be pretty much empty. Without them, it would be pretty much complicated.”

quentin.aries@washpost.com

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