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WorldVeteran climber on "especially bad year" on Mount Everest

19:55  29 may  2019
19:55  29 may  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

Three More Die on Mount Everest During Crowded Climbing Season

Three More Die on Mount Everest During Crowded Climbing Season KATHMANDU, Nepal — Three more people died Thursday on Mount Everest, as crowds of climbers added to the dangers of attempting to scale the world’s highest peak. The three died just days after a widely circulated photo showed a long line of climbers extending along a narrow ridge, waiting to reach the 29,029-foot summit and its expansive view of the Himalayas. Two others died on Mount Everest earlier this week. Expedition operators said the crowding was a result of a record number of permits issued by Nepal and a period of clear weather, which led several groups to push for the summit at once.

High-altitude climber Jim Davidson reached the top of Mount Everest in 2017. Dangerous and deadly overcrowding on Mount Everest is not likely to end anytime soon. Nepal says it has no plans to limit permits on the world’s highest mountain .

Dangerous and deadly overcrowding on Mount Everest is not likely to end anytime soon. High-altitude climber Jim Davidson reached the top of Mount Everest in 2017. Davidson joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss his own experiences climbing Everest and the permit process which has under

Veteran climber on "especially bad year" on Mount Everest© Rizza Alee / AP Nepal Crowded Everest

Dangerous and even deadly overcrowding is plaguing Mount Everest. The death toll on the world's highest mountain has climbed to 11 already this year — the most since 2015. Jim Davidson, a veteran high-altitude mountain climber and expedition leader who has twice reached the peak of Everest, sat down with "CBS This Morning" to talk about what it's like to scale the world's tallest mountain and explain the factors that have led to the rising death toll.

"It's been an especially bad year," Davidson said Wednesday. "We've had some bad weather, so the days that people could go to the summit got all compressed. It was a bigger crowd than average and maybe some people weren't fully trained. You stack all of those together and it turns out to be a really bad factor."

‘It Was Like a Zoo:’ Death on an Unruly, Overcrowded Everest

‘It Was Like a Zoo:’ Death on an Unruly, Overcrowded Everest Ed Dohring, a doctor from Arizona, had dreamed his whole life of reaching the top of Mount Everest. But when he summited a few days ago, he was shocked by what he saw. Climbers were pushing and shoving to take selfies. The flat part of the summit, which he estimated at about the size of two Ping-Pong tables, was packed with 15 or 20 people. To get up there, he had to wait hours in a line, chest to chest, one puffy jacket after the next, on an icy, rocky ridge with a several-thousand foot drop. He even had to step around the body of a woman who had just died.

Veteran mountain climber details crowded conditions, "constant exposure to danger" on Mount Dangerous and even deadly overcrowding is plaguing Mount Everest . The death toll on the It's hard to set an exact number, but if you keep letting more people come it's going to get worse every year ."

Mount Everest is Earth's highest mountain above sea level, located in the Mahalangur Himal sub-range of the Himalayas. The China–Nepal border runs across its summit point.

Another factor leading to overcrowding is the way the government of Nepal issues permits for climbers. This year, 381 permits have been issued for 44 teams. "The government does issue permits, but there seems to be no limit to the number of permits that are issued," Davidson said. "I think that they should restrict it some, especially based on experience. It's hard to set an exact number, but if you keep letting more people come it's going to get worse every year."

It is $11,000 to get a permit card and then there is the additional cost with time and equipment. Davidson estimates the total cost is closer to $45,000.

'We have to leave now': San Francisco man describes terrifying Everest traffic jam

'We have to leave now': San Francisco man describes terrifying Everest traffic jam Woody Hartman had only been on the summit of Mount Everest for a few minutes when his Sherpa guide grabbed him. "We have to leave now," he said, "Or we’ll be stuck here."Perhaps

11 people, including two Americans, have died climbing Mt . Everest in 2019, prompting concerns about traffic jams trapping tired climbers at the Veteran climber says "it's been an especially bad year " on Mount Everest - Продолжительность: 4:41 CBS This Morning 62 544 просмотра.

Heavy climber traffic on Mount Everest have led to exhaustion and tiredness, sometimes resulting in death. Photograph: Nirmal Purja/Project Possible/AFP/Getty Most deaths on Everest this year have been attributed to exhaustion and tiredness, exacerbated because a crowded route to and from the

"It takes a lot of your personal time to get ready, and it's tough on the family too," he said.

Recently released pictures have shown long lines of climbers waiting to reach the summit, biding their time in an area of extreme conditions and low oxygen known as the "death zone."

Veteran climber on "especially bad year" on Mount Everest© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. In this photo made on May 22, 2019, a long queue of mountain climbers line a path on Mount Everest. About half a dozen climbers died on Everest last week most while descending from the congested summit during only a few windows of good weather each May.

"We're up in the 'death zone' at 26,000 feet, so even on bottled oxygen, you're slowly dying," Davidson recounted. "You can feel your energy draining out of your legs and out of your core, and you get disassociated in your mind. It gets very difficult to be up there, just to exist."

"When we pass each other, one of us has to unclip from the line in order to get by each other," he said. "Trying to cooperate, but you don't speak the same language, you're wearing a mask, it's difficult to talk, so there's constant exposure to danger."

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