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WorldHong Kong Rocked by Fresh Protests Over Its Proposed Extradition Bill

06:10  12 june  2019
06:10  12 june  2019 Source:   time.com

Hong Kong leader says extradition bill will not be scrapped

Hong Kong leader says extradition bill will not be scrapped Hong Kong's pro-Beijing leader said Monday she had no plans to scrap a controversial plan to allow extraditions to the Chinese mainland, a day after huge crowds came out to oppose the proposal. "This is a very important piece of legislation that will help to uphold justice and also ensure that Hong Kong will fulfil her international obligations in terms of cross-boundary and transnational crimes," chief executive Carrie Lam told reporters. The city government is pushing a bill through the legislature that would allow extraditions to any jurisdiction with which it does not already have a treaty -- including mainland China.

The 2019 Hong Kong anti- extradition bill protests are a series of demonstrations in Hong Kong and other cities around the world, demanding the withdrawal of the Fugitive Offenders and Mutual Legal

Protesters flooded the streets of Hong Kong Sunday to oppose a bill that would allow China to extradite fugitives from the semiautonomous region. Massive Protest Held in Hong Kong Against Proposal to Ease Extradition to China.

Hong Kong Rocked by Fresh Protests Over Its Proposed Extradition Bill© PHILIP FONG—AFP/Getty Images Protesters occupy the streets outside the Legislative Council in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. -

Thousands of demonstrators poured into streets surrounding Hong Kong’s legislature Wednesday morning, choking major thoroughfares with barricades as the city braces for mass protests over a proposed extradition law that would, for the first time, allow fugitives to be sent to mainland China.

The fast-tracked legislation has ignited fears about the former British colony’s continued autonomy—promised after its return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997—and also underscored the depth of anxiety over its relationship to Beijing.

Hong Kong leader defiant as city gears up for fresh protests over extradition bill

Hong Kong leader defiant as city gears up for fresh protests over extradition bill Hong Kong leader defiant as city gears up for fresh protests over extradition bill

Protest groups to stage fresh rally and #612strike movement spreads before MPs scrutinise On Wednesday the proposed law will have its second and third readings in the city’s parliament, which Protest groups have vowed to stage a fresh rally outside parliament that day and have urged people

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Thousands braved thunderstorms in Hong Kong on Tuesday for a fresh wave of protests against a proposed extradition bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial, but the Chinese-ruled city’s leader said she would not back down.

Hundreds of young demonstrators staged an overnight protest Tuesday in the park abutting the Legislative Council, spreading tarps and sleeping bags over wet grass despite the bouts of rain.

In the morning, streams of fellow protesters clad in black joined them in a show of defiance against the extradition bill. The government has refused to withdraw the proposed legislation despite a massive march on Sunday through the heart of the financial hub.

Lawmakers are scheduled for a second debate of the bill this afternoon, but demonstrators are attempting to block access to the chambers, and have dragged barricades into key roads under the watch of the nearby columns of riot police.

Tensions escalated yesterday after the government announced the bill will go to vote by next week, all but guaranteeing its passage in a legislature dominated by pro-Beijing lawmakers.

Protests continue in Hong Kong over extradition bill: What's at stake?

Protests continue in Hong Kong over extradition bill: What's at stake? The protests were sparked by a controversial new extradition bill.

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong ’s embattled leader Carrie Lam remained defiant on Tuesday, pledging to push ahead with a proposed extradition Lam spoke two days after the city was plunged into a fresh political crisis after hundreds of thousands took to the streets to thwart the proposed law

Protests over proposed extradition bill sweep Hong Kong U.S. ambassador says Israel has right to annex parts of West Bank Supporters of the bill say there are safeguards in place to prevent anyone facing religious or

A citywide strike is expected Wednesday after unions, teachers, businesses and others began circulating calls on social media for a June 12 boycott.

The latest attempts to paralyze Hong Kong through acts of civil disobedience recall the pro-democracy demonstrations that shook the city during 2014’s “Umbrella Movement.” That uprising began with calls to “occupy Central” and already Wednesday’s sit-in at the legislature is being dubbed “Occupy 2.0.”

Authorities have reiterated calls for protesters to express their demands peacefully, but demonstrators say they have been left no real recourse after an estimated 1.03 million people marched on Sunday but failed to sway the government.

The weekend procession was largely peaceful, but culminated in a clash between police and holdout protesters in the very early hours Monday.

Police have said they have “sufficient manpower” to deal with any threat Wednesday. Police vans flashing red and blue line the streets approaching the legislatures, while dozens of officers already stand guard with batons, shields and firearms.

“Over a million people came out to march. In other countries the government would pay attention to that. Not in Hong Kong. Is that because the Hong Kong demonstrators are too peaceful?” says Karen Chan, a 21-year-old student who joined the overnight protest. “The government is not afraid and not listening.”

—With reporting by Aria Hangyu Chen, Amy Gunia and Hillary Leung / Hong Kong

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Hong Kong protesters take to the streets again after government apology falls flat.
For the third time in less than a week, Hong Kong protesters have taken to the streets over a controversial extradition bill with China. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Hundreds of mostly young people flooded into Harcourt Road outside the city's legislature Friday morning, where they had been staging a sit-in demanding the city's chief executive, Carrie Lam, resign and officially withdraw the bill.

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