World: Former UN chief says risks of nuclear conflict 'are higher' - PressFrom - US
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WorldFormer UN chief says risks of nuclear conflict 'are higher'

00:15  13 june  2019
00:15  13 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

House panel highlights risks over nuclear-storage stalemate

House panel highlights risks over nuclear-storage stalemate Southern California's San Onofre nuclear power plant was permanently closed in 2013, but the site remains home to 3.5 million pounds (1.59 million kilograms) of nuclear waste that has nowhere else to go. Members of a House subcommittee held a hearing Friday, June 7, 2019, not far from the defunct plant to highlight the urgency behind efforts to build a long-term national repository for used radioactive fuel, a proposal that has languished for decades in Washington. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File) LAGUNA NIGEL, Calif.

The risk of nuclear weapons being used is at its highest since World War Two, a senior U . N . security expert said on Tuesday, calling it an "urgent" issue that The nuclear ban treaty, officially called the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, was backed by the International Campaign to Abolish

Renata Dwan, UN chief of disarmament research, issued stark warning to world. The risk of nuclear weapons being used is at its highest since World War Two, a senior U . N . security expert said The nuclear ban treaty, officially called the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, was backed by

Former UN chief says risks of nuclear conflict 'are higher'© 2019 Photothek BERLIN, GERMANY - MAY 21: Former U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon speaks to the media on May 21, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images) UNITED NATIONS — Former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warned Wednesday that the risks of nuclear conflict "are higher than they have been in several decades" and said it is past time for the five nuclear powers to take steps toward disarmament.

Ban told the Security Council the failure of the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France to make progress on disarmament risks undermining the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, the world's single most important pact on nuclear arms.

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The risk of nuclear weapons being used is at its highest since World War Two, a senior U . N . security expert said on Tuesday, calling it an "urgent" issue that The nuclear ban treaty, officially called the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, was backed by the International Campaign to Abolish

The nature of international conflict seemed to change; no longer rivalry between great powers but bitter local wars where It has brought respected former officials and military men together to campaign for the abolition of nuclear weapons. "The election of Donald Trump," says Johnson, "has injected an

The treaty is credited with preventing the spread of nuclear weapons to dozens of nations since entering into force in 1970 and it has succeeded in doing this via a grand global bargain. Under the treaty, nations without nuclear weapons committed not to acquire them, those with nuclear weapons committed to move toward their elimination, and all nations endorsed everyone's right to develop peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

Treaty members include every nation but India, Pakistan and North Korea, all of which possess nuclear weapons, as well as Israel, which is believed to be a nuclear power but has never acknowledged it.

Trump, Macron downplay differences over Iran

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GENEVA (Reuters) - The risk of nuclear weapons being used is at its highest since World War Two, a senior U . N . security expert said on Tuesday, calling it an The nuclear ban treaty, officially called the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, was backed by the International Campaign to Abolish

"The risk of interstate conflict , including among great powers, is higher than at any time since the end of the Cold War," Coats told lawmakers during a "There is no indication there is any strategic change in the outlook of Kim Jong Un and his desire to retain his nuclear capacity to threaten the United

Ban said it is in the interests of the five nuclear powers, which are the permanent veto-wielding members of the Security Council, "to get serious about disarmament if they wish to maintain the near universal international commitment to preventing nuclear proliferation, particularly in the lead up to next year's NPT review conference."

"The consequences of failure do not bear contemplation," he said.

Ban, who is a co-chair of the group of prominent world leaders founded by Nelson Mandela known as The Elders, spoke at a Security Council meeting on conflict prevention and mediation.

He reiterated that his group believes nuclear weapons and climate change "pose two of the most severe existential threats to life on Earth as we know it."

When it comes to nuclear nonproliferation, Ban said, "the international community is confronted with two serious challenges, namely the Iranian nuclear development programs and securing the complete denuclearization of North Korea."

Iran says EU has failed to salvage 2015 nuclear deal - state TV

Iran says EU has failed to salvage 2015 nuclear deal - state TV Iran criticized on Monday the European signatories of its 2015 nuclear deal for failing to salvage the pact after President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of it last year and reimposed sanctions, state television reported. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "So far, we have not seen practical and tangible steps from the Europeans to guarantee Iran's interests ... Tehran will not discuss any issue beyond the nuclear deal," said foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi.

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These weapons, Kidwai said , have closed the “space for conventional war.” The United States, which at one time deployed over 7,000 tactical nuclear weapons in Europe aimed at Responding to US concerns, Kidwai has said that “Pakistan would not cap or curb its nuclear weapons programme

He expressed deep concern at the United States' withdrawal from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal with six world powers, saying that "it not only weakens the regional stability of the Middle East, but also sends the wrong signal to ongoing negotiations over North Korea's nuclear issue."

As for negotiations between the U.S. and North Korea, Ban said that unfortunately they "have come to a deadlock since the failure of the Hanoi summit last February" between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Ban, a former South Korean foreign minister, expressed support for U.S. efforts to achieve the complete denuclearization of North Korea and urged all countries to implement U.N. sanctions against Pyongyang.

He expressed hope that U.S.-North Korean negotiations will resume "as soon as possible."

U.S. has 'no interest' in new conflict in Middle East -U.S. military.
The United States has no interest in engaging in a new conflict in the Middle East but will defend American interests including freedom of navigation, the U.S. military said on Thursday as it directed a destroyer to the scene of an attack in the Gulf of Oman. U.S. Central Command said in a statement the destroyer USS Mason was en route to the scene of the attacks that damaged two tankers in the Gulf of Oman earlier in the day. The destroyer USS Bainbridge remains in close contact with the damaged tanker M/V Kokuka Courageous and will tolerate no interference, the statement said.

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