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WorldChina denies U.S. accusations of South China Sea missile tests

18:55  05 july  2019
18:55  05 july  2019 Source:   reuters.com

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The South China Sea is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U . S .- China relationship, which include a trade war, U . S . sanctions and Taiwan. PRC is an acronym for the People’ s Republic of China . China has not confirmed the missile tests and on Tuesday the foreign ministry declined to

The South China Sea disputes involve both island and maritime claims among several sovereign states within the region, namely Brunei, the People' s Republic of China (PRC), Republic of China

BEIJING, July 5 (Reuters) - China's Defence Ministry on Friday denied U.S. accusations that the Chinese military had recently carried out missile tests in the disputed South China Sea, saying instead that they had held routine drills that involved the firing of live ammunition.

The Pentagon said on Tuesday the missile launch was "disturbing" and contrary to Chinese pledges that it would not militarise the strategic waterway.

A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said on Friday that according to initial information, China appeared to have tested multiple anti-ship ballistic missiles last weekend. The official added that a detailed analysis was under way.

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China previously moved land-based anti-ship cruise missiles to it' s military stations in the region, a crucial shipping route where "Of course the Pentagon was aware of the Chinese missile launch from the man-made structures in the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands," Pentagon spokesman Lt.

The South China Sea , which is home to more than 200 specks of land, serves as a gateway to global sea routes where approximately .4 trillion of trade The window for testing remains open until Wednesday, and the official expects the Chinese military to test again before it closes. While the U . S

In a brief statement sent to Reuters responding to the U.S. claims, China's Defence Ministry said this was not true. "The relevant reports do not accord with the facts," it said.

"Recently, the People's Liberation Army Southern Theatre Command arranged live ammunition firing drills in waters near Hainan island in accordance with annual exercise arrangements," the ministry added. "These were not aimed at any country or any specific target," it said, without elaborating.

Hu Xijin, editor of the widely read Chinese tabloid the Global Times, published by the ruling Communist Party's official People's Daily, said in an English-language tweet the U.S. claims were misleading.

"Reliable source told me that Pentagon's claim of 'Chinese missile launch from the man-made structures in the South China Sea' is misleading information and some details came out of thin air, intended to sow discord among regional countries," he wrote. Hu gave no other details.

Chinese military conducts anti-ship ballistic missile tests in the hotly contested South China Sea

Chinese military conducts anti-ship ballistic missile tests in the hotly contested South China Sea The development comes as the United States and China have paused tensions in their ongoing trade battle. U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed over the weekend at the G-20 summit in Japan to not impose new tariffs on each other's goods. A burgeoning trade deal between the two countries fell through in the beginning of May. The South China Sea, which is home to more than 200 specks of land, serves as a gateway to global sea routes where approximately $3.4 trillion of trade passes annually.

China has not denied the reports. China ' s aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, pictured here in April, carried out drills on Monday.AFP - Getty Images. China ’ s militarization of the Spratlys has been a growing issue for nations around the South China Sea , a vital shipping channel that is also believed to have

U . S . assertions that China is militarizing the South China Sea are "ridiculous", China said on Thursday, after U . S . Defense Secretary Jim Recent satellite photographs showed China appeared to have deployed truck-mounted surface-to-air missiles or anti-ship cruise missiles at Woody Island.

The South China Sea is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U.S.-China relationship, which include a trade war, U.S. sanctions and self-ruled Taiwan, which is claimed by China as its own.

China and the United States have repeatedly traded barbs in the past over what Washington says is Beijing's militarisation of the South China Sea by building military installations on artificial islands and reefs.

China says the United States is to blame for tensions by repeatedly sending warships close to Chinese-held islands, and that China's sovereignty in the area is irrefutable.

The Chinese government said last week that the military was carrying out drills between the Spratly and Paracel Islands starting last weekend and ending on Wednesday, warning other shipping not to enter a designated area.

China's claims in the South China Sea, through which about $5 trillion in shipborne trade passes each year, are contested all or in part by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam.

News of the China missile tests was first reported by NBC News. (Reporting by Ben Blanchard in Beijing Additional reporting by Idrees Ali in Washington Editing by James Dalgleish)

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