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WorldJapan won't contribute ships to U.S. Middle East maritime force: Mainichi

08:25  02 august  2019
08:25  02 august  2019 Source:   reuters.com

Iran observes all U.S. ships in Gulf region: Iran navy chief

Iran observes all U.S. ships in Gulf region: Iran navy chief Iran observes all U.S. ships in Gulf region: Iran navy chief

Tokyo (Reuters) - Japan will not send warships to join a U . S .-led maritime force to guard oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz fearing a military response from But Japan may send warships independently to protect Japanese ships in the world’ s most important oil artery, the newspaper said on Friday.

But Japan may send warships independently to protect Japanese ships in the world' s most important oil artery, the newspaper said on Friday. Japan ' s government would likely face opposition at home to any military venture that could put its Self Defense Forces in harms way or threaten the well being of

Tokyo (Reuters) - Japan will not send warships to join a U.S.-led maritime force to guard oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz fearing a military response from Iran, but it may send patrol aircraft, said the Mainichi newspaper, citing unidentified government sources.

Japan won't contribute ships to U.S. Middle East maritime force: Mainichi© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga speaks during a press conference to announce the new line up of Cabinet at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe reshuffled his Cabinet on Thursday, opting for seasoned party veterans to help restore his battered popularity. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

But Japan may send warships independently to protect Japanese ships in the world's most important oil artery, the newspaper said on Friday.

Centuries-old Japan-Korea dispute something Russia and China can exploit

Centuries-old Japan-Korea dispute something Russia and China can exploit While Japan and South Korea may not agree on who owns a cluster of tiny, rocky islands off their coastlines, they do agree that Russian bombers shouldn't be flying above them. © Photo Illustration/ GettyThe remote Pacific outcrop, called the Dokdo Islands in South Korea and the Takeshima Islands in Japan, made headlines Tuesday following an alleged violation of the airspace above them by a Russian jet.

Tokyo (Reuters) – Japan will not send warships to join a U . S .-led maritime force to guard oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz fearing a military response from Iran, but it may send patrol aircraft, said the Mainichi newspaper, citing unidentified government sources.

Japan will not send warships to join a U . S .-led maritime force to guard oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz fearing a military response from Iran, but it may send patrol aircraft, said the Mainichi newspaper, citing unidentified government sources.

"We are closely monitoring the situation and continue to collect information while working closely with the United States and other countries," said Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, when asked about the report.

As its key Asian ally and a major regional naval power, Washington is keen for Japan, which is the world’s fourth-biggest oil buyer, to play a major role in its proposed maritime force.

Japan's government would likely face opposition at home to any military venture that could put its Self Defense Forces in harms way or threaten the well being of Japanese living in Iran. Japan's military has not fought overseas since World War Two.

The United States has blamed Iran for a series of attacks since mid-May on shipping around the Strait of Hormuz, including one on a tanker operated by a Japanese shipping company. Tehran rejects the allegations.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last week called on Japan, Britain, France, Germany, South Korea, Australia and other nations to join a maritime force to guard oil tankers sailing through the Strait of Hormuz.

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