World: Climate Crisis: A quarter of people are living with extreme water stress - PressFrom - US
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WorldClimate Crisis: A quarter of people are living with extreme water stress

08:30  07 august  2019
08:30  07 august  2019 Source:   cnn.com

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Qatar, Israel and Lebanon top list of places with worst shortages, as climate crisis threatens more ‘day zeroes’. A quarter of the world’s population across 17 countries are living in regions of extremely high water stress , a measure of Living without water : the crisis pushing people out of El Salvador.

“ Water stress is the biggest crisis no one is talking about. Its consequences are in plain sight in the form of food insecurity, conflict and migration, and WRI attributes the lack of supply in this region to its hot and dry climate and growing demands. “Experts have pinpointed water scarcity as a force that

A quarter of the world's population is living in regions of extremely high water stress -- with "once unthinkable" water crises becoming common, researchers have said.

Climate Crisis: A quarter of people are living with extreme water stress© Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images Extreme water stress threatens a quarter of the world's population, WRI finds.

With the climate crisis biting, 17 countries -- home to one in four people on the planet -- are deemed to be "extremely high water-stressed," meaning they are now consuming more than 80% of their available water every year, the World Resources Institute (WRI) has revealed in a report.

And the growing shortages are fueling the risk of conflict in such countries, concentrated in the Middle East and North Africa, the researchers say.

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WASHINGTON, United States — Nearly a quarter of the world's population lives in 17 countries facing extremely high water stress "When demand rivals supply, even small dry shocks—which are set to increase due to climate change—can " Water stress is the biggest crisis no one is talking about.

A quarter of the world's population lives in countries where water demand threatens to outstrip supply. Forty-four countries are under extremely high or high water stress . Extreme weather events due to climate change add to the equation. Countries with a large population or scarce land

Paul Reig, director of WRI's Aquedact water risk project, told CNN that the high level of demand relative to supply in these areas "puts huge pressure on available water resources and poses a threat to agricultural, industrial and domestic water users that rely on it."

Qatar is ranked as the world's most water-stressed country, followed by Israel and Lebanon, Iran and Jordan. In Africa, Libya and Eritrea are suffering the worst shortages.

"Twelve out of the 17, extremely high water stressed countries are in the Middle East and North Africa," Reig told CNN. "The region is is naturally dry and arid. But the situation there is getting worse. There's a number of reports and research pointing to the fact that water stress can exacerbate both migration and conflict, and that water is currently a source of growing tension and violence in the Middle East," Reig said.

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" Water stress is the biggest crisis no one is talking about," said Steer. "Its consequences are in plain sight in the form of food insecurity, conflict and "India can manage its water risk with the help of reliable and robust data pertaining to rainfall, surface, and groundwater to develop strategies that

One quarter of the world's population are living in areas where the competition for water resources is extreme The report cautioned that increased water stress and the climate crisis could lead to more "day zeroes," a term that In addition to the 17 countries facing extreme water stress , New Mexico

Experts also warn that such a narrow margin between supply and demand could push countries towards more "day zeroes" -- extreme water crises that threaten to see taps running dry, a situation that Cape Town came to the verge of last year.

"Water stress is the biggest crisis no one is talking about. Its consequences are in plain sight in the form of food insecurity, conflict and migration, and financial instability." said Andrew Steer, president and CEO of the World Resources Institute.

In June, Chennai became the first major Indian city to face an acute water shortage. India, ranked 13th in the world for water stress, has more than three times the population of the other 16 countries in the "extremely stressed" category combined.

Even in countries with low water stress overall, individual areas could still experience extreme water stress. The USA ranks 71st on WRI's list, but the state of New Mexico is classed as experiencing extremely high stress levels.

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