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WorldAmazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?

16:00  23 august  2019
16:00  23 august  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

Amazon rainforest fires: Smoke can be seen from space

Amazon rainforest fires: Smoke can be seen from space Smoke from record wildfires raging in the Amazon rainforest blanketed São Paulo on Monday and could be seen from space.

Amazon rainforest , the world ’ s largest tropical forest is on fire since 3 Weeks. It’s an area that almost never burns on its own, yet the blazes have grown so intense that they blacked out the sky above.

Wildfires raging in the Amazon rainforest have hit a record number this year, with 72,843 fires detected so far by Brazil' s space research center INPE Now I am Nero, setting the Amazon aflame. But it is the season of the queimada,” he told reporters. Space agency INPE, however, said the large

The Amazon is burning at an alarming rate as tens of thousands of fires lay waste to the world's largest tropical rainforest.

Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?© Provided by USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

Brazil's National Institute of Space Research said there have been 74,155 fires in the Amazon this year as of Tuesday, according to its satellite data: an 84% increase from the same period last year.

The Amazon is often called "the lungs of the world," absorbing greenhouse gases that would otherwise harm the planet. It also is home to a number of indigenous people who rely on the forest's resources.

Here's why it's on fire and why it's become such a big problem.

How Did the Amazon Rainforest Fires Start?

How Did the Amazon Rainforest Fires Start? Brazil has experienced a record number of wildfires this year, more than half of which occurred in the Amazon region. That's according to data collected by the country's National Institute for Space Research (INPE). The figures show an 83 percent increase in comparison to the same period in 2018, representing the highest number of blazes since the agency began collecting such data in 2013, Reuters reported. In fact, INPE says it has identified more than 72,000 fires in Brazil between January and August this year, comfortably more than the roughly 40,000 recorded in the entirety of 2018.

More than 74,000 wildfires have been detected in the world ’ s largest rain forest this year, an 84 RIO DE JANEIRO — Fires are burning in the Amazon rain forest at one of the fastest paces in The blazes are so large and widespread that smoke has wafted thousands of miles away to the Atlantic

It is the world ' s largest tropical rain forest , famed for its biodiversity. But the ‘lungs of the earth’ have been on fire for over two weeks and it received media attention only recently. The forest has been burning at a really fast pace and no major step has been taken by the Brazil government or the

Raging fires worldwide: July was the hottest month ever on Earth. Now massive wildfires are burning across the globe.

Why is the Amazon on fire?

People who want to clear land in the Amazon for business prospects are cutting down portions of the forest, leaving them out to dry and setting them on fire. With the trees out of the way, they have room to grow agriculture or to raise cattle.

This practice is illegal but is not being monitored by Brazil's government, according to Nigel Sizer, chief program officer of Rainforest Alliance. Not only is the government turning the other way, President Jair Bolsonaro is encouraging the practice, Sizer said.

"With confidence, we can say that a lot of that is illegal and is happening because the government has given the nod to illegal clearing and burning across the Amazon," Sizer said. "The president has even encouraged the invasion of indigenous territories and areas that the previous administrations have really been working hard to protect."

The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires.

The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires. The Brazilian Amazon is burning at a record rate. Nearly 10,000 fires have sparked in the last week, and satellites have spotted the blazes.

The Amazon is the single most important ecosystem for fighting climate change. The forest has shown its capability to combat extreme temperatures. The National Institute for Space Research has reportedly detected 39,194 fires this year in the world ’ s largest rainforest , a 77% increase from the

The Amazon rainforest , also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South

Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?
Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?

Slideshow by photo services

Bolsonaro has blamed environmental nonprofits for acting as obstacles in his mission to further develop Brazil's economy. His administration has eased protections of areas such as the Amazon, making way for people to damage the rainforest.

In response to the staggering increase in wildfires this year, Bolsonaro, without evidence, suggested nongovernmental organizations could be starting them to make his administration look bad. He took office Jan. 1 of this year.

"Maybe – I am not affirming it – these (NGO people) are carrying out some criminal actions to draw attention against me, against the government of Brazil," Bolsonaro told reporters.

When asked to provide evidence, he gave none.

"There is a war going on in the world against Brazil, an information war," Bolsonaro said.

Sizer, who has worked in the Amazon the past 30 years, says previous Brazilian administrations have been environmentally conscious and successfully decreased the rate of deforestation. With this president, though, he's worried about what's to come.

"It takes a while for people to react and respond and what we’re seeing now is the first wave of that," Sizer said. "I wouldn’t be surprised if these numbers get a lot of worse if the government does not change course."

'All you can see is death.' The regions reeling from the Amazon rainforest fires

'All you can see is death.' The regions reeling from the Amazon rainforest fires The smoke is so thick, at times the Cessna airplane had to climb to stay out of it. At times your eyes burn and you close the air vents to keep the cabin habitable. Sometimes it is so bad, it is hard to see how bad it actually is on the ground below. Flying above the Amazon's worst afflicted state (during last week), Rondonia, is exhausting mostly because of the endless scale of the devastation. At first, smoke disguised the constant stream of torched fields, and copses; of winding roads that weaved into nothing but ash.

An icon of the world globe, indicating different international options." But another, less talked-about issue the rain forest faces, is the threat of wildfires. While fires are a natural part of many forest life cycles, drier years can lead to particularly severe fire seasons that can damage the forests and

FIRES are raging across the Amazon rainforest , spreading dangerous smoke to nearby cities and towns - but why is the Amazon rainforest so President Bolsonaro said the slashing of NGO funding by his government could be a motive for them burning down the forest as they seek to bring his

Amazon fires: Burning and smoke from the fires can be seen from space

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Are fires in the Amazon normal?

The Amazon holds a lot of moisture – massive fires aren't a natural occurrence there. Sizer said if it's a dry season and you set a fire in the undergrowth it may spread a little bit, but it peters out pretty quickly. But once you start clearing forest and let the trees dry, fires can cause more damage, he said.

Video provided by Reuters

"The forest shifts from being a fire-resistant ecosystem to a fire-prone ecosystem," Sizer said.

The trees, plants and animals in the Amazon are not adaptive to fire, and so are easily killed. This is different from the forests in North America that have adapted to wildfires and can survive them, Sizer said.

Sizer said putting out massive wildfires in the Amazon is "basically impossible." They'll run their course until they run out of chopped down trees to burn. The best way to stop a crisis like this is for the government to strictly protect the land, according to Adrian Forsyth, co-founder of Amazon Conservation Association.

"If you had an enlightened president in Brazil, they would put a stop to illegal deforestation in Brazil, just in the way that they prevent robbery and murder," Forsyth said.

How will the Amazon's fires affect people?

"The Amazon is a rain factory," Forsyth said, describing the Amazon's role in people's lives.

G-7 Countries Slammed Over $22 Million Pledge to Fight Amazon Wildfires: 'Netflix Paid $100 Million to Stream 'Friends''

G-7 Countries Slammed Over $22 Million Pledge to Fight Amazon Wildfires: 'Netflix Paid $100 Million to Stream 'Friends'' "The US has spent over $100 million on Trump's golf trips," journalist Jordan Uhl tweeted. "Let me get this straight: $1 billion is immediately pledged when an old church burns down in Paris," Twitter user Tom Talisman wrote. "A global catastrophe on the other hand, one that poses a threat to every living being on this planet, is met with $20 million from nations with a combined GDP of $40 trillion?" Several others made the same comparison. "Within hours of Norte [sic] Dame catching fire, France and prominent European families pledged $1 billion to rebuild it," political activist and commentator Nathan H.

The largest rainforest on the planet, the Amazon is also home to countless endangered species of plants. Why is there not the same level of outrage for the fires destroying the #AmazonRainforest #Regram #RG @IamNickRose: Terrifying to think that the Amazon is the largest rain forest on the planet VIDEO: A Record Number of Fires Are Currently Burning Across the Amazon Rainforest .

Wildfires are burning around the world . But perhaps even more alarming are the wildfires in the Amazon rainforest , the world ’ s largest tropical forest . It’s an area with torrential rain that almost never burns on its own, yet the blazes have burned for more than two weeks, growing so intense

Forsyth said the Amazon generates rain that helps agriculture grow across the Americas, impacting basic food supplies. Additionally, without the Amazon's carbon absorption, the harms of the climate crisis become increasingly unavoidable, Forsyth said.

"The Amazon is the biggest storer of tropical carbon in the world, and if that goes up into the sky it’s going to be impossible to meet the climate goals that we’re trying to establish," Forsyth said.

Moira Birss, finance campaign director of nonprofit Amazon Watch, said the indigenous people and others who live in or near the forest face the most immediate harm.

"The fires specifically for folks who are living in that are extremely harmful, the air they’re breathing, the ability to live their daily lives, and in some cases, it’s affecting people’s land," Birss said.

Birss said many people have reached out to Amazon Watch asking about ways they can help. Ultimately, she said, it's the government's responsibility to put an end to illegal fire setting. Sizer said one way people can help, though, is by donating to Brazilian environmental groups.

Contributing: The Associated Press

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Amazon fire: Why is the world's largest rain forest burning?

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