•   
  •   
  •   

WorldA timeline of the US military presence in Afghanistan

09:00  08 september  2019
09:00  08 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

As he campaigns for president, Joe Biden tells a moving but false war story

As he campaigns for president, Joe Biden tells a moving but false war story Biden’s tale of heroism, an emotional highlight of his speeches since 2016, appears to be an embellished jumble of several real events.

During the nearly 18 years since the United States went to war in Afghanistan, the number of U.S. troops there reached as high as 100,000 and then plummeted after the 2011 killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in neighboring Pakistan to the some 14,000 today. Now President Donald Trump has abruptly called off negotiations between the U.S. and the Taliban, the insurgent group toppled in the 2001 U.S.-led invasion, on a deal that would begin a final troop pullout as part of ending America's longest war.

A timeline of the US military presence in Afghanistan© Provided by The Associated Press Resolute Support (RS) forces and Afghan security personnel clear debris at the site of a car bomb explosion in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. A car bomb rocked the Afghan capital on Thursday and smoke rose from a part of eastern Kabul near a neighborhood housing the U.S. Embassy, the NATO Resolute Support mission and other diplomatic missions. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul) A timeline of the US military presence in Afghanistan© Provided by The Associated Press Resolute Support (RS) forces arrive at the site of a car bomb explosion in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. A car bomb rocked the Afghan capital on Thursday and smoke rose from a part of eastern Kabul near a neighborhood housing the U.S. Embassy, the NATO Resolute Support mission and other diplomatic missions. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

A timeline of the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan:

Green Beret from Idaho ID'd as 3rd US soldier killed in Afghanistan in under two weeks

Green Beret from Idaho ID'd as 3rd US soldier killed in Afghanistan in under two weeks The identity of the third American soldier to die in Afghanistan in under two weeks was disclosed Friday — a day after President Trump confirmed a plan to withdraw at least some troops from the South-Central Asian nation once U.S. forces are assured the country will not become a haven for other terrorist groups. © Bumblee_Dee/iStockphoto/Getty Images American Soldiers and US Flag. US troops Sgt. 1st Class Dustin Ard, a Green Beret from Idaho, died in Afghanistan’s Zabul Province on Thursday. He is survived by his wife, who is pregnant, as well as a young daughter. He would have turned 32 in October, the Washington Examiner reported.

___

Oct. 7, 2001: President George W. Bush announces that U.S. and British troops have begun striking Afghanistan for harboring the al-Qaida terrorists blamed for the Sept. 11 attacks. The massive air campaign initially targets Taliban troops, training camps and air defenses.

___

November 2001: 1,300 American troops are in the country as commandos and ground troops, mostly Marines, begin to arrive.

___

December 2001: The U.S. force grows to 2,500 as troops scour the mountainous Tora Bora region looking for al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden. The Taliban is ousted and an interim Afghan government is established.

Mattis had problems with Trump -- and with Obama, Biden and Bush (Opinion)

Mattis had problems with Trump -- and with Obama, Biden and Bush (Opinion) Lost in much of the one-dimensional coverage of Mattis' book is what is actually in it, writes Peter Bergen. It's true that Mattis implies sharp criticism of Trump, but he also registers strong disagreement with George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Joe Biden, who he argues have made strategic errors that have been costly to the American military and to American interests. Interviewers on Mattis' book tour have pressed him about Trump, but he has largely maintained what he refers to as the French virtue of the "devoir de réserve" -- the duty of silence -- that he says former public servants should keep about their work.

___

March 2002: 7,200 U.S. troops are in Afghanistan as Americans lead allied Afghan forces in the largest ground assault of the war to date.

___

December 2002: The U.S. ends the year with about 9,700 troops deployed, mostly going after Taliban insurgents.

___

December 2003: The year ends with about 13,100 troops in Afghanistan.

___

April 2004: The number swells to 20,300 as the U.S. builds up forces along the Afghan-Pakistani border and provides security for fledgling reconstruction projects.

___

December 2006: Attention has shifted to the escalating war in Iraq; the force in Afghanistan remains just over 20,000.

___

December 2007: The force in Afghanistan rises to 25,000. Still, Iraq is the priority.

___

May 2009: As fighting in Afghanistan becomes more intense, the number of U.S. troops surpasses 50,000.

___

December 2009: Troops now number more than 67,000, and the situation is deteriorating, with escalating violence and more service members killed. Obama orders in another 33,000 troops to battle al-Qaida militants and a resurgent Taliban.

Afghan president postpones US trip to discuss Taliban deal

Afghan president postpones US trip to discuss Taliban deal KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan's president has postponed a planned visit to Washington early next week where he was to discuss the U.S.-Taliban talks on ending America's longest war, a person familiar with the negotiations said Friday. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The development emerged after the U.S. envoy negotiating with the Taliban, Zalmay Khalilzad, abruptly returned to Qatar for unexpected talks with the insurgents on the deal that he had described as complete just days ago.

___

August 2010: The U.S. force reaches 100,000.

___

May 2011: Bin Laden is found hiding in neighboring Pakistan and killed in a U.S. special operations raid. There are still about 100,000 troops in Afghanistan.

___

June 2011: Saying the U.S. is meeting its goals in Afghanistan, Obama announces his withdrawal plan: Bring home 10,000 troops by the end of 2011, and continue at a steady pace until handing over security responsibilities to the Afghans by 2014.

___

September 2012: Troop levels down to 77,000.

___

December 2013: Down to 46,000 troops, the slow withdrawal continues.

___

March 2014: With nearly 34,000 troops in Afghanistan, Obama orders the Pentagon to develop options for a complete military withdrawal, because Afghan President Hamid Karzai refuses to sign a security agreement with the United States.

___

May 2014: Obama announces his plan to pull virtually all U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by the end of 2016, when his second term in office will be drawing to a close.

___

December 2014: Troop levels have been cut in half since Obama's announcement in May, down to 16,100. Obama declares their combat mission over, but troops will continue training and advising Afghan forces.

Trump weighs partial US pullout from Afghanistan as both sides step up attacks

Trump weighs partial US pullout from Afghanistan as both sides step up attacks U.S. officials are struggling to seal a deal with the Taliban that would allow President Donald Trump to fulfill his pledge to slash the number of American troops in Afghanistan, and eventually end the United States' longest war, without the Asian country sliding deeper into violence or again becoming a sanctuary for terrorists. Days after Zalmay Khalilzad, the top U.S. envoy to the Afghan peace process, announced in Kabul that an "agreement in principle" had been reached with the Taliban, he rushed back to the Persian Gulf state of Qatar, where he's spent a year negotiating with the Islamic group, which remains a deadly insurgent force 18 years after U.S.

___

March 2015: Troops decline to their current number - about 9,800 - on track for a nearly total withdrawal in 2016.

___

Oct. 15, 2015: In a reversal, Obama says the situation is too fragile for the American military to leave. He announces plans to keep the current force of about 9,800 in place through most of 2016 to continue counterterrorism missions and advise Afghans battling a resurgent Taliban. The plan is for the number to decrease to about 5,500 troops by December 2016.

___

July 6, 2016: Saying the security situation in Afghanistan "remains precarious," Obama announces that instead of dropping the U.S. troop level to 5,500, he will keep it at about 8,400 through the end of his term on Jan. 20, 2017. He said his successor can determine the next move.

___

Aug. 21, 2017: Trump warns against a "hasty withdrawal" from Afghanistan, saying that "conditions on the ground, not arbitrary timetables, will guide our strategy from now on." Weeks later it is confirmed that additional troops will be deployed, eventually bringing the number to about 14,000.

___

Sept. 2, 2019: The U.S. envoy negotiating with the Taliban, Zalmay Khalilzad, announces that under a deal reached "in principle" with the insurgent group the first 5,000 U.S. troops would withdraw within 135 days of the agreement becoming final.

___

Sept. 7, 2019: Trump says secret meetings between him and Taliban leaders and with the Afghan president at Camp David are now cancelled, citing the death of a U.S. service member in a Taliban attack in Kabul two days earlier.

Read More

Arnold Palmer at 90: The King is still a big presence in golf and always will be.
Arnold Palmer would have turned 90 today, but the massive footprint he left behind and the example he set lives on 3 years after his passing

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!