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WorldHong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices

18:25  15 september  2019
18:25  15 september  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Hong Kong tells US to stay out; students form protest chains

Hong Kong tells US to stay out; students form protest chains HONG KONG (AP) — Thousands of students formed human chains outside schools across Hong Kong on Monday to show solidarity after violent weekend clashes between police and activists pushing for democratic reforms in the semiautonomous Chinese territory. The silent protest came as the Hong Kong government condemned the "illegal behavior of radical protesters" and warned the U.S. to stay out of its affairs. Thousands of demonstrators held a peaceful march Sunday to the U.S.

HONG KONG — Black-clad protesters hurled gasoline bombs at government offices in central Hong Kong on Sunday, as a day that began with a peaceful march by tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators descended into clouds of tear gas deployed by the police and ugly brawls

Hong Kong police fired tear gas and water cannons on Saturday as pro-democracy protesters threw gasoline bombs in the Police fired round after round of tear gas as protesters took cover behind umbrellas between the local headquarters of China's People's Liberation Army and government HQ.

Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices
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HONG KONG — Black-clad protesters hurled gasoline bombs at government offices in central Hong Kong on Sunday, as a day that began with a peaceful, if unauthorized, march by tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators quickly descended into pitched street battles.

What Chinese Students Abroad Really Think About Hong Kong

What Chinese Students Abroad Really Think About Hong Kong As tensions have swelled on Australian university campuses over the democracy movement in Hong Kong, the battle lines seem to have been neatly drawn: Chinese students on the side of China, and Chinese-Australian students on the side of Hong Kong. But inside the halls, the reality is more complicated. Views are often less absolute, and loyalties not so predictably traced. Some students from mainland China shout their allegiance to their homeland; others privately voice sympathy for the Hong Kong protesters.

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong police fired water cannon and volleys of tear gas to disperse protesters throwing petrol bombs at government buildings on Sunday, as months of sometimes violent demonstrations showed no sign of letting up.

HONG KONG – Hong Kong police fired water cannon and volleys of tear gas to disperse protesters throwing petrol bombs at government buildings on Sunday, as “Radical protesters are currently occupying Harcourt Road in Admiralty, vandalizing Central Government Offices and repeatedly

The violence punctuated a weekend that began with fistfights between people on opposing sides of the city’s yawning political divide. Some protesters on Sunday vandalized a subway station and hurled bricks and gasoline bombs at a complex of government buildings that includes the city’s legislature. The police responded with tear gas and water cannons.

While the turnout at the Sunday march was lower than that of similar marches this summer, the chaotic scenes through the weekend highlighted the staying power — and raw anger — of a movement that has produced 15 consecutive weekends of unrest in a global financial hub known for order and efficiency.

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The tumult came just over two weeks before a major political moment on Oct. 1: the 70th anniversary of modern China’s founding. A key question is what protesters will do on that date, and how Beijing and the Hong Kong police will respond.

Hong Kong Won’t Concede to More Protester Demands, Top Adviser Says

Hong Kong Won’t Concede to More Protester Demands, Top Adviser Says Hong Kong’s government doesn’t see any benefit in conceding to more demands from protesters and the increasingly violent demonstrations are unlikely to stop anytime soon, according to a top adviser to leader Carrie Lam. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Thousands of Hong Kong protesters have returned to the streets marking the 15th consecutive weekend of mass demonstrations. What we covered here. Protesters defy police ban: Thousands of pro-democracy activists have marched through central Hong Kong despite the lack of an official permit.

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong anti- government protesters set fire to shops and hurled petrol bombs on Sunday, police said, after riot police fired tear gas , water cannon and rubber bullets to disperse thousands in the Tsim Sha Tsui harbor-front hotel district. The protesters , many in all-black

Hong Kong Protesters Hurl Gasoline Bombs at Government Offices© Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times The turnout on Sunday was lower than it has been for similar marches this summer.

“I don’t think the government will be able to respond to our demands by Oct. 1, so people will keep fighting for what they want,” Cheng Sui-ting, 27, an environmental educator, said at Sunday’s march, which began in the Causeway Bay shopping district and quickly stopped traffic.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s beleaguered leader, said early this month that she would formally withdraw the contentious extradition bill that prompted the initial protests in June and led to the territory’s worst political crisis since it returned to Chinese control in 1997.

But mass rallies have continued, in part because the movement’s demands have gradually expanded to include broad calls for political reform, including universal suffrage, and an independent inquiry into allegations of police brutality.

On Sunday, protesters marched west from Causeway Bay toward Admiralty, a district that includes many government offices and the Hong Kong headquarters of the Chinese military. Along the way, they set fire to a banner commemorating China’s coming 70th anniversary.

Some protesters confronted police officers who were stationed on a footbridge near the police headquarters. “Corrupt cops,” they chanted, “may your whole family die!”

Hong Kong police 'pushed to the limit'

  Hong Kong police 'pushed to the limit' Hong Kong's police force is at the limits of its capacity as it struggles to contain the fallout from a political crisis now more than three months old. (Pictured) A protestor hurls back an exploded tear gas shell at police officers on Aug. 31.

Other protesters occupied a major road in Admiralty, piling traffic barricades inside a nearby train station and across one of its entrances. A few used metal poles and umbrellas to smash some of the station’s glass railings.

The police responded by blanketing the streets with tear gas and spraying arcs of blue-dyed water from cannons mounted atop large vans. As nightfall approached, the scene had descended into a pitched street battle. The police later chased protesters from the area, back toward Causeway Bay. During the retreat, some protesters built roadblocks in the Wan Chai neighborhood and set a fire outside an entrance to its train station.

The city’s subway operator said it had closed Admiralty Station because of a “sudden escalation in the situation.”

Chris Cheung, a 22-year-old student who was helping to reinforce a makeshift barricade at one of the station’s exits, said protesters had targeted the subway operator, the MTR Corporation, for allowing the police to beat protesters inside stations on other occasions this summer.

“Some members of the public might understand why we do this,” he added. “If they have conscience, they would have watched the news and seen how people got beaten and understood our perspective.”

The weekend had started with fistfights on Saturday in at least two areas of Hong Kong, apparently after protesters confronted government supporters who were vandalizing the so-called Lennon Walls that the movement has set up across the city for pro-democracy messages and artwork.

Hong Kong police, protesters clash in 16th weekend of rallies

  Hong Kong police, protesters clash in 16th weekend of rallies Riot police and protesters in Hong Kong fought brief skirmishes near the Chinese border on Saturday, the latest clashes during huge pro-democracy protests that have battered the financial hub for more than three months. Police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at small groups of hardcore activists who had built barricades in the outlying town of Tuen Mun, some of them lobbing bricks and at least one Molotov cocktail. Police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at small groups of hardcore activists who had built barricades in the outlying town of Tuen Mun, some of them lobbing bricks and at least one Molotov cocktail.

At one point on Saturday, scuffling broke out in the Fortress Hill neighborhood of Hong Kong Island near the site of a vandalized Lennon Wall. Video footage showed men using Chinese flags to beat other men, presumably pro-democracy demonstrators, in the middle of a busy road.

And at a mall on the other side of Hong Kong’s harbor, a fight broke out between pro-democracy groups and pro-Beijing demonstrators who had gathered to sing the Chinese national anthem and waive Chinese flags.

The Hong Kong Hospital Authority said that at least 25 people had been hospitalized with injuries sustained in the scuffles on Saturday.

Days before Sunday’s march, an established Hong Kong advocacy group, the Civil Human Rights Front, had applied for a permit to hold the march legally. But the police rejected the request, citing concerns for public safety, and the group officially canceled the march.

But many protesters have been ignoring such bans for weeks now.

“I come out because it is my right, and I don’t care whether the police agree or not,” said Joesy Lau, 53, a clerk at an investment firm. “It’s my right.”

Sunday’s march followed days of smaller pro-democracy rallies around the city, including a politically tinged light display that coincided with the Mid-Autumn Festival, a Chinese holiday that celebrates the harvest and normally features colorful lanterns.

Ms. Cheng, the environmental educator, said that the turnout at the march did not reflect the full range of participation in the pro-democracy movement. “I believe people are using different means to fight for their demands,” she said.

The march also came a week after a rally outside the American Consulate descended into violence.

That rally began peacefully, as hundreds of thousands gathered to drum up support for a bill moving through the United States Congress that would, among other things, require an annual justification for why the United States should offer Hong Kong special trade and business privileges.

But within hours, hard-core demonstrators on the fringes of the rally smashed windows and vandalized Central Station, a vital transit hub for shoppers and commuters. Police officers in riot gear later made arrests across the city, and sprayed tear gas in Causeway Bay to disperse protest crowds.

Read More

'You Don't Have to Face It Alone.' Hong Kong Protests Propelled by Hidden Support Network .
The quiet backing of older, professional locals helps explain the longevity of the youth-led movement. Their assistance includes ‘school bus’ rides home, protective gear and financial aid.After dropping off one group, he returns for more, carrying water and a bag of T-shirts for a quick disguise. He can log 100 miles shuttling between conflict zones and the outlying apartment towers where many protesters live.

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