World: As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World - - PressFrom - US
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WorldAs Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World

19:11  17 september  2019
19:11  17 september  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Bolivian forest fires destroy two million hectares

Bolivian forest fires destroy two million hectares Scientists from La Paz estimate that regeneration of the local ecosystem will take about 300 years. The government is under pressure to declare a national emergency. Defence Minister Javier Zavaleta blamed people for starting the fires, calling them "saboteurs" who are playing a "macabre game". "We put out the fires and there are people behind us that are starting them again… We cannot control wildfires like this," he said. High temperatures and strong winds also stoked the flames over the weekend.

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Wildfires burned across Indonesian Borneo and Sumatra on Tuesday About 80 percent of the fires were set intentionally to clear forestland for palm plantations, officials The fires in Indonesia and the Amazon contribute to climate change by releasing carbon dioxide, a

Why are there fires in the Amazon ? Wildfires often occur in the dry season in Brazil but they are also deliberately started in efforts to illegally deforest land for cattle ranching. Ricardo Mello, head of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Amazon Programme, said the fires were "a consequence of the

As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World
As Amazon Smolders, Indonesia Fires Choke the Other Side of the World

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Brazil has captured global attention over deliberately set fires that are burning the Amazon rainforest, often called the earth’s lungs. Now Indonesia is compounding the concern with blazes to clear forest on the other side of the world.

Brazil is 'not the culprit' for the Amazon fires, says country's foreign minister

Brazil is 'not the culprit' for the Amazon fires, says country's foreign minister Brazil's foreign minister addressed the Amazon fires and climate change on Wednesday -- but not in the way you might expect. © ERIC BARADAT/AFP/AFP/Getty Images Brazilian Foreign Minister Ernesto Araujo speaking at the Heritage Foundation on September 11, 2019, in Washington, D.C. In a speech at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, DC, Minister of Foreign Affairs Ernesto Araujo denied that his country was responsible for the devastation of the rainforest, and accused other countries and activists of trying to "invade Brazil" under the guise of climate change action.

In 2011, Indonesia banned further leasing of rainforest land for clearing and development. Thus, many of the fires raging across the country were illegally lit with Thankfully, you can help out: an initiative by the World Resources Institute and DigitalGlobe seeks to expedite the process using crowdsourcing.

A fire being extinguished on peatland and fields in the province of South Sumatra in Indonesia .CreditUlet Ifansasti/Getty Images. “It’s like a blame game,” said Bustar Maitar, global leader of the Indonesia Forest Campaign at Greenpeace. “Of course all the fires are coming from

Hundreds of wildfires burned across Indonesian Borneo and Sumatra on Tuesday, producing thick clouds of smoke that disrupted air travel, forced schools to close and sickened many thousands of people. Poorly equipped firefighters were unable to bring them under control.

Officials said that about 80 percent of the fires were set intentionally to make room for palm plantations, a lucrative cash crop that has led to deforestation on much of Sumatra.

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The slash-and-burn conflagrations, which tore through sensitive rainforests where dozens of endangered species live, immediately drew comparisons to the wildfires in the Amazon basin that have destroyed more than 2 million acres.

'This is not Mars': Sky in Indonesia turns red

  'This is not Mars': Sky in Indonesia turns red Pictures and videos of the phenomenon went viral on social media over the weekend.One resident in Jambi province, who captured pictures of the sky, said the haze had "hurt her eyes and throat".

Indonesia is the world ’s largest producer of palm oil and fires are frequently intentionally lit to clear the land with the resulting haze an annual headache. Anything above 300 is considered hazardous. Endangered wildlife such as orangutans have also been forced to flee the forests because of the fires .

Indonesia needs regional and local political leadership to simultaneously adopt a zero-tolerance policy to forest fires while at the same time providing more Although almost half of the forest fires take place in large plantation holders’ concessions, conservationist Erik Meijaard argues that the focus on

“That’s how they clear the land, using the cheapest method and conducted by many people,” said Agus Wibowo, a spokesman for Indonesia’s disaster management agency.

The fires in Indonesia and the Amazon contribute to climate change by releasing carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere and by destroying trees and vegetation that remove such emissions from the air.

Aerial footage showed huge clouds of white smoke billowing up across vast tracts of Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. Both Borneo and the island of Sumatra are home to endangered species of orangutan.

The disaster management agency identified 2,900 hot spots throughout Indonesia, including a large number of wildfires burning on Sulawesi and Java islands and in Papua Province.

The fires occur annually at this time of year, the dry season, and have long been a contentious issue between Indonesia and its neighbors as the smoke drifts over Singapore and parts of Malaysia, including the capital, Kuala Lumpur.

Sky turns blood red in Indonesia

  Sky turns blood red in Indonesia "This is earth, not planet Mars," one social media user postedIn the province of Jambi, the sky appeared to turn a reddish hue and conditions made it hard to breathe. A social media user caught the dramatic scene in a video she posted to Twitter.

Brazil and Indonesia do not appear on conventional industrial indices of the world 's leading polluters but both countries are among the world 's top four carbon emitters when deforestation is factored in. Independent news email. Only the best news in your inbox.

Bring the Smoldering Timewarped Ember to Kiatke in Orgrimmar. Rewards Smoldering Timewarped Ember and 500 Timewarped Badge. As the stone rests in your hand, visions of fire and of dragons dance through your mind, but you can hear conversation taking place in Orgrimmar and

The fires now are the worst Indonesia has seen in several years, in part because this year has been particularly dry.

Indonesia’s president, Joko Widodo, visited an area of Sumatra on Tuesday that has been among the hardest hit and said the government would seed clouds in the hope of bringing rain. He also said he would pray for rain.

He urged residents not to set fires and to put out new blazes immediately.

The president said 52 firefighting aircraft had been deployed in the fire zones in Kalimantan and Sumatra, roughly one for every 26 of the hot spots identified there.

“We are dealing with sizable forests, vast peatlands,” he told reporters. “If there are lots of fires like this, it’s not easy. Therefore I ask everybody, all the people, not to burn land, both forests and peat.”

Last week, the government said it had shut down more than two dozen plantations after fires were spotted burning on their land, including four owned by Malaysian companies and one by a Singaporean firm. The companies could face charges.

The president’s chief of staff, a retired general named Moeldoko, sparked controversy last week with a tweet saying that the fires were a test from God.

“All disasters come from God,” he wrote, suggesting that the fires were not caused by people. “And what we need to do is not to complain but try to live it with sincerity and pray for God’s help.”

He later apologized.

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Strong 6.5 magnitude quake strikes eastern Indonesia: USGS .
A strong 6.5-magnitude earthquake hit off the remote Maluku islands in eastern Indonesia Thursday, US seismologists said, but no tsunami warning was issued. The quake struck about 37 kilometres (23 miles) offshore northeast of Ambon in Maluku province at 8:46 am local time, at a depth of 29 kilometres, according to the US Geological Survey.

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