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World Hong Kong police accused of beating, torturing protesters

00:50  21 september  2019
00:50  21 september  2019 Source:   abcnews.go.com

'Glory to Hong Kong': The new anthem embraced by protesters

'Glory to Hong Kong': The new anthem embraced by protesters A defiant protest anthem penned by an anonymous composer has become the unofficial new soundtrack to Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests, belted out by crowds at flashmobs in malls, on the streets and in the football stands. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "Glory to Hong Kong" first appeared on YouTube on 31 August and has quickly won a huge following among those pushing for greater democratic freedoms in the semi-autonomous Chinese city.

“The Hong Kong police ’s heavy-handed crowd-control response on the streets has been live-streamed for the world to see. Much less visible is the plethora of police abuses against protesters that take place out of sight,” Amnesty's East Asia Director Nicholas Bequelin said in a report.

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Amnesty International accused Hong Kong police on Friday of torture and other abuses in their handling of more than three They have also been seen beating protesters on the ground with batons, with footage of one such attack on cowering passengers on an MTR subway

Amnesty International has documented "reckless and indiscriminate tactics" used by the Hong Kong police in responding to 15 weeks of anti-government protests.

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The Hong Kong police did not respond to questions from Reuters. During the protests , police spokesmen have repeatedly defended the use of Protesters often aggregate the best ideas in online groups and vote on courses of action, he said. China has accused foreign countries of being behind

HONG KONG — A sea of Hong Kong protesters marched through the dense city center in the pouring rain on Sunday, defying a police ban, in a vivid display of the movement’s continuing strength after more than two months of demonstrations, days of ugly violence and increasingly vehement warnings

The London-based human rights group claims detained protesters have been tortured, too.

a group of people standing in front of a building: Riot police agents march to clear the surroundings of Legco during a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong, Sep 15, 2019.© Ivan Abreu/SOPA Images/REX Riot police agents march to clear the surroundings of Legco during a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong, Sep 15, 2019.

“The Hong Kong police’s heavy-handed crowd-control response on the streets has been live-streamed for the world to see. Much less visible is the plethora of police abuses against protesters that take place out of sight,” Amnesty's East Asia Director Nicholas Bequelin said in a report.

“The evidence leaves little room for doubt – in an apparent thirst for retaliation, Hong Kong’s security forces have engaged in a disturbing pattern of reckless and unlawful tactics against people during the protests," the report read. "This has included arbitrary arrests and retaliatory violence against arrested persons in custody, some of which has amounted to torture.”

Hong Kong police 'pushed to the limit'

  Hong Kong police 'pushed to the limit' Hong Kong's police force is at the limits of its capacity as it struggles to contain the fallout from a political crisis now more than three months old. (Pictured) A protestor hurls back an exploded tear gas shell at police officers on Aug. 31.

Hong Kong ’s high level of autonomy ‘not just a unilateral gift from some Beijing communist leader [but] based on an agreement with the British’, he says. Tiananmen vigil: thousands of Hong Kong police officers mobilised for banned June 4 events. The force says the ban will be officially enforced on the

The Hong Kong Police Force (HKPF) is denying accusations made by the UK human rights non-governmental organization (NGO) Amnesty International that authorities have used excessive force and sometimes torture against anti-extradition bill and pro-democracy demonstrators during the past

(MORE: Congress weighs legislation to back Hong Kong protests, with local activists' backing)

Amnesty International is calling for an independent investigation after interviewing nearly two dozen people who were arrested, along with lawyers, health workers and others.

Most of the detainees who spoke came forward requested anonymity because they "fear reprisals from the authorities amid a climate of impunity," the group said.

In a statement to the Reuters news agency, responding to the report, police said they have respected the “privacy, dignity and rights” of those in custody and allowed those detained to be in contact with lawyers and their families.

a group of people standing in front of a building: Riot police agents march to clear the surroundings of Legco during a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong, Sep 15, 2019.© Ivan Abreu/SOPA Images/REX Riot police agents march to clear the surroundings of Legco during a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong, Sep 15, 2019.

“The force to be used by police shall be the minimum force necessary for achieving a lawful purpose,” police said, according to Reuters.

The protests began June 9, when hundreds of thousands of mostly young people marched against a proposed extradition bill that would have allowed individuals to be sent from semi-autonomous Hong Kong to mainland China for trial. Hong Kong executive leader Carrie Lam has since pulled the bill from consideration, but the movement has continued and protesters' demands have expanded to include a call for an investigation into police brutality and universal suffrage.

Hong Kong protesters trample Chinese flag, set fires

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Amnesty said that more than 1,300 people have been arrested since the protests began.

(MORE: Protesters in Hong Kong embrace slogan made famous by Bruce Lee )

The group said it had documented cases of people being beaten in custody. One man who was detained at a police station following a protest in August told Amnesty he was severely beaten and told that if he tried to protect himself, police would break his hands, according to the report.

a group of people walking in the rain: Anti-government protesters brave tear gas and water cannon to demonstrate outside the government headquarters complex in Hong Kong Sunday Sep 15, 2019.© Sunny Mok/EYEPRESS/Newscom Anti-government protesters brave tear gas and water cannon to demonstrate outside the government headquarters complex in Hong Kong Sunday Sep 15, 2019.

"I felt my legs hit with something really hard," Amnesty quoted him as saying. "Then one [officer] flipped me over and put his knees on my chest. I felt the pain in my bones and couldn’t breathe. I tried to shout but I couldn’t breathe and couldn’t talk."

The group said he was then hospitalized for several days with a bone fracture and internal bleeding.

Amnesty also highlighted the case of another protester who said she was being clubbed with a police baton as she ran from officers. She accused police of continuing to beat her even after she was put in restraints, according to the group.

(MORE: China attacks Pelosi for meeting Hong Kong activists)

“Time and again, police officers meted out violence prior to and during arrests, even when the individual had been restrained or detained. The use of force was therefore clearly excessive, violating international human rights law,” Bequelin said.

“Given the pervasiveness of the abuses we found, it is clear that the Hong Kong Police Force is no longer in a position to investigate itself and remedy the widespread unlawful suppression of protesters. Amnesty International is urgently calling for an independent, impartial investigation aimed at delivering prosecutions, justice and reparation, as there is little trust in existing internal mechanisms such as the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC),” he added.

Five years on, Hong Kong's 'Umbrella' generation has sharp edge

  Five years on, Hong Kong's 'Umbrella' generation has sharp edge From doing homework by torchlight to hurling flaming molotov cocktails at riot police: the character of Hong Kong's protests has changed dramatically in five years, with young demonstrators hardened by the failure of their peaceful Umbrella Movement. Then-student Bunny was one of thousands of Hong Kongers who camped out on the streets in a 79-day occupation that had a festival edge of good humour and patience.

On Tuesday, three pro-democracy activists from Hong Kong will address the U.S. Congress, as it weighs two pieces of legislation to boost the protest movement.

Both bills have bipartisan support in both the House and Senate.

The PROTECT Hong Kong Act would prohibit U.S. exports of police equipment there, including tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper spray, and more. The second bill, called the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, requires the administration to produce reports on the status of human rights and rule of law and of export controls in Hong Kong, requests that the State Department not deny visas to Hong Kongers for being arrested for protesting, and requires sanctions on those "responsible for the erosion of Hong Kong's autonomy and serious abuses of human rights."

Joshua Wong, one of the 2014 Umbrella Movement leaders who was recently arrested for his role in the current protests, will testify before the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, along with pro-democracy activist Denise Ho and student group spokesperson Sunny Cheung. Wong will urge lawmakers to pass the legislation, arguing it has "broad support" in Hong Kong, according to prepared remarks obtained by ABC News.

The legislation would be the most significant show of external support the demonstrators have received, but one that China has blasted and warned the U.S. not to take.

(ABC News' Conor Finnegan contributed to this report.)

Battered and bruised, Hong Kong cleans up for sensitive Chinese anniversary .
Hong Kong's metro stations and roads re-opened on Monday after a chaotic weekend that saw police fire water cannon, tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters who set fires and threw petrol bombs outside government offices and across central districts. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The Chinese territory is on edge ahead of the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic on Tuesday, with authorities eager to avoid scenes that could embarrass the central government in Beijing.

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