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World Turkey summons US ambassador, condemns House resolutions

14:41  30 october  2019
14:41  30 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

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ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkey on Wednesday condemned two resolutions passed by the U.S. House of Representatives that symbolize deteriorating Turkish-American relations.

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Addressing his ruling party, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he wouldn't recognize the nonbinding House resolution to recognize the century-old mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks as genocide. The bill passed 405-11.

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Erdogan then said Turkey "strongly condemns" a bipartisan bill to sanction senior Turkish officials and its army for Turkey's incursion into northeastern Syria, which passed 403-16.

Both bills, passed Tuesday, were a sign of further deterioration in Turkish-American relations, which have been strained over multiple issues, especially U.S. support for Syrian Kurdish fighters considered terrorists by Ankara.

Turkey's foreign ministry said that it summoned U.S. Ambassador David Satterfield on Wednesday over the resolutions.

Turkey disputes the description of mass deportations and killings of Ottoman Armenians in 1915 as genocide and has lobbied against its recognition in the U.S. for years. It has instead called for a joint committee of historians to investigate.

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"We are saddened that a slander against our country is being accepted by a country's parliament," he said and added, "we would consider this accusation the biggest insult towards our nation."

The step to consider the events as genocide "does not count for anything," Erdogan argued, saying American lawmakers had acted "opportunistically" to pass the bill at a time when Turkey is being widely criticized for its incursion into Syria.

Turkey's cross-border offensive against Syrian Kurdish fighters, which Ankara says is necessary for its national security, began on Oct. 9 after months of Turkish threats and a sudden decision by U.S. President Donald Trump to withdraw troops and abandon Kurdish allies against the Islamic State group. Trump's move was widely criticized by both the Republicans and the Democrats.

The second bill sanctioning Turkey shows the bipartisan disapproval of Trump's decision and condemns Turkey's offensive. The measure would bar most U.S. weapons sales to Turkey and slap sanctions on foreigners attempting to send the Turks military equipment. It would also block high-ranking Turkish officials from their assets in the U.S. and restrict their travel here.

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"We will never accept those who attack Turkey and myself for the sake of supporting the PKK, which is a terror organization that is the killer of tens of thousands of people," Erdogan said.

He was referring to the Kurdistan Workers' Party, which has waged a 35-year armed insurgency in Turkey's southeast and eastern regions. The Syrian Kurdish forces are linked to the group and follow the same ideological leader, Abdullah Ocalan, who is imprisoned in Turkey.

FILE - In this April 24, 2019, file photo, protesters hold portraits of Armenian intellectuals during a rally held to commemorate the 104th anniversary of the 1915 mass killing of Armenians in the Ottoman Turks in Istanbul. The House has voted overwhelmingly to recognize the century-old mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks as genocide. The move is a clear rebuke to NATO ally Turkey. The nonbinding resolution passed 405-11 Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. The measure comes after Ankara’s recent incursion against the Kurds along the Turkish-Syrian border. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this April 24, 2019, file photo, protesters hold portraits of Armenian intellectuals during a rally held to commemorate the 104th anniversary of the 1915 mass killing of Armenians in the Ottoman Turks in Istanbul. The House has voted overwhelmingly to recognize the century-old mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks as genocide. The move is a clear rebuke to NATO ally Turkey. The nonbinding resolution passed 405-11 Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. The measure comes after Ankara’s recent incursion against the Kurds along the Turkish-Syrian border. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)

Turkey halted its operation through two separate cease-fires brokered by the U.S. and Russia to allow the Kurdish fighters to withdraw 30 kilometers (19 miles) away from the Turkish border but Erdogan renewed threats to resume the operation if promises weren't fulfilled.

Turkey and allied Syrian fighters now control a portion of the previously Kurdish-held border zone, as Russian and Syrian government troops move into the rest of the areas following a deal with the Kurdish force.

Turkey's foreign ministry criticized American lawmakers in a statement, saying it would be wrong for them to take their "vengeance"for Turkey's Syria offensive through the Armenian genocide bill.

"Undoubtedly, this resolution will negatively affect the image of the U.S. before the public opinion of Turkey," the ministry said.

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