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World After the U.S. outlawed polygamy, thousands of Mormons fled to Mexico. Nine just died there.

00:36  06 november  2019
00:36  06 november  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Trump: US ready to help in 'cleaning out' the 'monsters' who killed Americans

  Trump: US ready to help in 'cleaning out' the 'monsters' who killed Americans President Trump said Tuesday the U.S. is willing to aid Mexico in "cleaning out these monsters," after at least 10 members of a prominent Mormon family were killed in an ambush attack near the border between the two countries. © Getty Trump: US ready to help in 'cleaning out' the 'monsters' who killed Americans The dead included three women and seven children, including two infants, according to a report by the Arizona Republic."If Mexico needs or requests help in cleaning out these monsters, the United States stands ready, willing & able to get involved and do the job quickly and effectively," Trump tweeted.....

Nine just died there . The murder of three women and six children is brutal epilogue to a forgotten exodus. A Mormon -owned store in northermn Mexico , circa 1900. To avoid arrest, hundreds, then thousands , of Mormons fled to land purchased by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Mexico has suffered a string of violent episodes in the last month, each as devastating and infuriating for citizens as the last. Multiple family members posted a video, said to have been taken after the attack, showing a charred vehicle riddled with bullet holes, with smoke still rising from it.

They refused to bend to the will of Congress. So the Mormons set off for Mexico by horse and wagon, their bags packed with dried fruit and baked goods, their belief in polygamy unshakable.

a group of people riding on the back of a horse drawn carriage: A Mormon-owned store in northermn Mexico, circa 1900. (Library of Congress)© LOC/LOC A Mormon-owned store in northermn Mexico, circa 1900. (Library of Congress)

It was 1885. That year, Mark Twain published the “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” A French ship delivered the Statue of Liberty to New York City. A skyscraper went up in Chicago. And the U.S. government had just outlawed polygamy, plural marriage that critics equated with slavery.

To avoid arrest, hundreds, then thousands, of Mormons fled to land purchased by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Chihuahua desert, the site of a brutal ambush Monday of a fundamentalist Mormon family. At least nine people — three women and six children — were killed.

More than a hundred years ago, Mormons — including Mitt Romney’s family — fled to Mexico so they could practice polygamy. They’ve been plagued by cartel violence, infighting, and murder ever since.

  More than a hundred years ago, Mormons — including Mitt Romney’s family — fled to Mexico so they could practice polygamy. They’ve been plagued by cartel violence, infighting, and murder ever since. The victims, all women and children, were members of La Mora, a Mormon settlement in the Sonora state founded as an offshoot of the Mormon church. The victims, all women and children, were US citizens and members of La Mora, a Mormon settlement in the state of Sonora founded as an offshoot of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, according to the Arizona Republic.

Nine US citizens, three women and six children, have been killed in an attack by suspected drug cartel gunmen in northern Mexico . But the Mormon Church never renounced polygamy in its scriptures. The Colonia LeBaron community now includes both Mormons and Catholics who have settled there .

Mormons fled from America to Mexico in the 19th century to continue to practice polygamy . Today their communities are among the many victims of The nine U . S .- Mexican family members who were killed Monday in a still-unexplained attack were part of a decades-long migration of fundamentalist

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Polygamy was eventually renounced by the church. But for Mormons, the colonies established in Mexico represent an important chapter in church lore — an event, as one historian described it, that “constituted the last great effort of Mormonism to retain its peculiar nineteenth-century integrity by physical flight from an unfriendly environment.”

One of the families that made the trek to Mexico was the Romney family, including Utah Sen. Mitt Romney’s grandfather Gaskell Romney. His only wife gave birth there to Mitt’s father, George Romney, who, like his son, ran for president of the United States. (Mitt’s great-grandfather Miles Park Romney had multiple wives.)

A suspect has been arrested in the massacre of family from a Mormon community in Mexico

  A suspect has been arrested in the massacre of family from a Mormon community in Mexico A suspect has been arrested in the massacre of nine family members from a Mormon community on the Mexican side of the border with the United States, Mexican authorities said Tuesday. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The Ministerial Agency for Criminal Investigations (AMIC) said it has detained an individual who was holding two bound and gagged hostages in the hills of Agua Priests in the state of Sonora.

At least nine members of the LeBaron family, including six children, were killed in the massacre Two relatives Alex and Julian LeBaron told Reuters nine people had died , though a government source The group broke away from the mainstream Mormon church when it abandoned polygamous U . S . Ambassador to Mexico Christopher Landau, who travelled to Sonora earlier on Monday for unrelated

The brutal killing of nine members of an American family in northern Mexico on Monday highlights After the United States criminalized polygamy in 1882, the leader of the Church of Jesus Christ of “They were seen as colonies of refuge,” said W. Paul Reeve, a professor of Mormon studies at the

Getting to Mexico was arduous.

Without reliable maps, the families traveling by wagon relied on notes and drawings pinned to trees by settlers traveling the same routes before them. They came under constant surveillance by hostile Native Americans. Arriving at the Mexican border, custom officials charged them hundreds of dollars in duties.

In Mexico, life for the Romneys and other Mormons was both backbreaking and mystical, as Washington Post reporter Nick Miroff recounted in 2011 during Mitt Romney’s campaign for president. The family, he wrote:

lived out of wagon boxes and helped chisel irrigation canals along the sides of the valley to plant apple orchards, which soon became the most productive in Chihuahua. When the river ran dry, the colonists prayed for water, according to family lore, and the 1887 Sonora earthquake struck soon after, rupturing an aquifer upriver, as if by providence. Water has flowed reliably through the valley ever since.

About 4,000 Mormons ultimately made the journey to two provinces — Chihuahua and Sonora — where they settled in eight communities, according to “The Trek South: How the Mormons Went to Mexico,” a 1969 academic paper in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly.

US victims in Mexico massacre were tied to family with long history of violence

  US victims in Mexico massacre were tied to family with long history of violence The roadside killings of nine U.S. citizens in northern Mexico has brought renewed attention to the scattered communities of Mormons who settled in the country more than a century ago to escape persecution. The six women and three children whom assailants ambushed Monday as they drove toward Arizona from the town of Bavispe in Sonora state included descendants of a fundamentalist Mormon community that has lived in the country for decades. The Mexican government has not identified suspects in the crime or a motive, though a Mexican official said the killers may have mistaken the family for members of a rival drug cartel.

Nine members of a Mormon community of dual U . S .- Mexican citizens were killed in northern The target of the attack were members of a farming community of Mormon settlers that moved south of the border nearly a century ago to practice polygamy after a dispute with the church over the practice.

The nine U . S . citizens who were killed in a brutal ambush by drug cartel gunmen Monday while traveling in Mexico belonged to a Mormon offshoot Members of the LeBaron family settled the area in the early 20th century after a patriarch was excommunicated for polygamy .Adriana Zehbrauskas

But their time there was somewhat truncated.

For one thing, the church began phasing out polygamy, all but ending such weddings by 1904, according to the academic article. That stopped more settlers from coming, depriving the communities of new resources.

And then, during the Mexican Revolution in 1912, the Mormon migrants became targets of violent attacks by rebel leader Inez Salazar. Almost all of the Mormons fled back to the United States, with large numbers of them settling in Texas.

But some Mormons, including Romney’s relatives, stayed and still live in the region today. They are separate from the fundamentalists, who still emigrate to the region to practice polygamy, including the LeBarons, the family targeted in this week’s attack.

Read more from Retropolis:

The time a president deported 1 million Mexican Americans for supposedly stealing U.S. jobs

The story of Donald Trump’s grandfather, who came to the U.S. as an unaccompanied minor

Pancho Villa, prostitutes and spies: The U.S.-Mexico border wall’s wild origins

‘Cheap slaves’: Trump, immigration and the ugly history of the Chinese Exclusion Act

From Trotsky to Morales, Mexico's asylum tradition .
From Leon Trotsky to Luis Bunuel to Salvador Allende's widow, Mexico has a long tradition of offering asylum to political exiles -- right down to newly arrived Bolivian ex-president Evo Morales. An even more famous figure arrived seven years later: Trotsky. Exiled from the Soviet Union in 1929 by Joseph Stalin, the Marxist revolutionary drifted from Turkey to Norway to France before finally landing in Mexico in 1937."It was the muralist Diego Rivera who asked President Lazaro Cardenas to grant (Trotsky) asylum. But we all know the consequences. Mexican protection failed and Ramon Mercader came along," said Gutierrez.

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