World: From Trotsky to Morales, Mexico's asylum tradition - - PressFrom - US
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World From Trotsky to Morales, Mexico's asylum tradition

04:20  13 november  2019
04:20  13 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

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From Leon Trotsky to Luis Bunuel to Salvador Allende' s widow, Mexico has a long tradition of offering asylum to political exiles -- right down to newly arrived Bolivian ex-president Evo Morales . Whether Republicans fleeing Francisco Franco after Spain' s country' s Civil War or Argentines

Mexico ' s foreign minister has asked Bolivia to grant safe passage to former President Evo Morales . Evo Morales will be granted asylum in Mexico after the former Bolivian president made a request to live in the Central American country, a top official confirmed Monday.

From Leon Trotsky to Luis Bunuel to Salvador Allende's widow, Mexico has a long tradition of offering asylum to political exiles -- right down to newly arrived Bolivian ex-president Evo Morales.

Bolivia's ousted President Evo Morales waves during his arrival to take asylum in Mexico, in Mexico City, Mexico, November 12, 2019. REUTERS/Luis Cortes© Reuters Bolivia's ousted President Evo Morales waves during his arrival to take asylum in Mexico, in Mexico City, Mexico, November 12, 2019. REUTERS/Luis Cortes

Whether Republicans fleeing Francisco Franco after Spain's country's Civil War or Argentines, Chileans and Brazilians fleeing military dictatorships in the 1970s, Mexico has welcomed many thousands of political asylum-seekers over the years.

Mexico grants asylum to Bolivia's Evo Morales, demands safe conduct

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“ Mexico , in accordance with its tradition of asylum and non-intervention, has received 20 people from the Bolivian executive [branch] and legislature in the official residence in La Paz, so we also decided to offer asylum to Evo Morales ,” Ebrard tweeted. Morales resigned on Sunday evening after both

In December that year the Mexican government offered Trotsky refuge and protection, which he gratefully accepted. He and Natalya sailed from The Trotskys lived in the Coyoacan area of Mexico City as guests at the Blue House, the home of the painters Diego Rivera and his wife Frida Kahlo.

"I'm very proud to head a government that guarantees the right to asylum," President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Tuesday, as Morales arrived after resigning amid growing unrest triggered by his controversial re-election to a fourth term.

Morales, for his part, said Mexico "saved my life," after exiting the Mexican air force plane sent to fetch him from a Bolivia in flames.

According to retired Mexican diplomat Agustin Gutierrez Canet, the first political figure granted exile in Mexico was Nicaraguan revolutionary Cesar Augusto Sandino, who led an uprising against the US military occupation of Nicaragua in the 1920s.

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Bolivia’s Evo Morales accepted Mexico ’ s offer of political asylum , thrusting leftist President Andres Manuel , Ebrard says Mexico granting asylum on humanitarian grounds. Morales said his house was attacked Soviet leader Leon Trotsky , who became an exile after clashing with Joseph Stalin

Morales thanks Mexico for ‘saving my life’. The Mexican government has refused to say where the 60-year-old will live, and insisted that its offer of asylum should be understood as part of a tradition of providing safety to persecuted political leaders from Leon Trotsky to activists who fled Argentina and

However, Sandino left Mexico in 1930, frustrated at what he called the Mexican government's broken promise to aid his cause.

An even more famous figure arrived seven years later: Trotsky.

Exiled from the Soviet Union in 1929 by Joseph Stalin, the Marxist revolutionary drifted from Turkey to Norway to France before finally landing in Mexico in 1937.

"It was the muralist Diego Rivera who asked President Lazaro Cardenas to grant (Trotsky) asylum. But we all know the consequences. Mexican protection failed and Ramon Mercader came along," said Gutierrez.

Mercader, a Spanish communist and secret agent for the Soviet intelligence services, infiltrated Trotsky's inner circle, then assassinated him with an ice axe at his home in 1940.

Under Cardenas, who was president from 1934 to 1940, Mexico also welcomed more than 20,000 Spanish exiles fleeing Franco's regime after the Republicans' defeat in the Civil War.

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales arrives in Mexico after accepting political asylum

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LA PAZ, Bolivia — Evo Morales , the former president of Bolivia who resigned under pressure from street protests and the military, was granted asylum in Mexico on Monday, departing from the country at a time when it is deeply polarized and leaderless.

MEXICO CITY — When Evo Morales stepped off a Mexican government plane on Tuesday and into And in the past few years, tens of thousands of Central Americans have applied for asylum here Among the best-known figures granted sanctuary in Mexico was Leon Trotsky after his exile from the

The Republican government-in-exile was based in Mexico from 1939 to 1946.

The exiles included the poet Leon Felipe, a friend of Che Guevara and Fidel Castro -- who himself fled to Mexico after waging an aborted rebellion in Cuba, then went on to launch the Cuban Revolution from there -- and Bunuel, the legendary filmmaker.

Bunuel, a one-time spy and propagandist for the Republicans, moved to Mexico in 1946, becoming a Mexican citizen and filming his classic movie "The Young and the Damned" there.

More exiles arrived during the brutal Latin American dictatorships of the 1970s. They included Hortensia Bussi, widow of Chile's late socialist president Allende, who fled to the Mexican embassy in Santiago and ultimately Mexico itself after her husband died during the coup that ousted him in 1973.

Mexico also took in Central Americans during the wars that rocked that region in the 1980s, including Guatemalan indigenous activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu.

- Politically risky -

Taking in Morales could be a politically risky bet for Lopez Obrador, a fellow leftist elected last year.

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  Bolivia's Jeanine Anez declares herself acting president as Evo Morales vows to fight from abroad Bolivian senator Jeanine Anez declared herself the country's acting leader Tuesday, despite a boycott by former President Evo Morales' allies that left the legislative chamber short of the legal minimum number of lawmakers required to appoint her. © JORGE BERNAL/AFP/AFP via Getty Images Bolivian senator Jeanine Anez, gestures after proclaiming herself the country's new interim president during a session of Congress, despite it failed to reach a quorum, on November 12, 2019 in La Paz. - Lawmakers had been summoned to formalize Sunday's resignation of Evo Morales and confirm 52-year-old Anez as interim president.

(Bloomberg) -- Bolivia’s Evo Morales accepted Mexico ’ s offer of political asylum , thrusting leftist President Andres Mexico has a long tradition of granting asylum to foreign leaders. Soviet leader Leon Trotsky , who became an exile after clashing with Joseph Stalin, moved to Mexico in 1937 and

Mexico ’ s foreign ministry said it had decided to take in Morales for humanitarian reasons. Morales said in a tweet announcing his departure that he was grateful to the Mexican government and its people for granting him asylum to “defend our lives” – and that he would soon return to Bolivia.

It could strain the "peace and love" relationship he has sought to maintain with US President Donald Trump, who openly detests Morales.

At home, Lopez Obrador's opponents were quick to pounce.

Morales "is a dictator clinging to power! He's a persona non grata in Mexico," tweeted former president Vicente Fox, of the conservative National Action Party (PAN).

Even celebrated Mexican writer Elena Poniatowska, a Lopez Obrador ally, joined in.

"Why do presidents want to stay in power forever? Why does Evo Morales insist on believing there is no one but him?" she tweeted Saturday.

However, Gutierrez, the diplomat, said granting Morales asylum was in line with Mexico's commitments under international treaties.

"It's important that political asylum not be subject to ideological considerations," he said.

"It's for people who are being politically persecuted, endangering their lives, liberty or safety."

That was the case for Morales, he said.

Marta de Cea is glad for Mexico's asylum tradition.

The 74-year-old Argentine woman fled to Mexico in 1976 after being kidnapped by the military regime.

"They helped us very much. I'm still here after more than 40 years. I'm a Mexican citizen. My home is here, my daughters are Mexican," she said, her voice breaking.

"I'm very grateful to this country."

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Bolivia’s Interim Leader Says Nation Must ‘Reconstruct Democracy’ After Morales’s Ouster .
In her first televised address to the nation Wednesday, Bolivia’s interim president, Jeanine Añez Chavez, urged a return to normalcy after weeks of violence, even as the ousted president, Evo Morales, called her government unconstitutional and his backers vowed to disrupt it. With the backing of the military, Ms. Añez met with advisers on Wednesday to appoint a new cabinet, stressing her interest in a finance minister who could reinvigorate the economy. In her speech, she said she would be guided by the rule of law and equality of all citizens, and wanted to seek “a national consensus.

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