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World Flooded Venice had tourists taking selfies and residents in tears

06:30  15 november  2019
06:30  15 november  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Tourists, Venetians slosh through flooded lagoon city

  Tourists, Venetians slosh through flooded lagoon city Tourists and Venetians alike donned high boots and took to strategically placed raised walkways on Tuesday to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city. Venice's tide forecast office said the water level peaked at 1.27 meters (about 4 feet 3 inches) Tuesday morning but warned that an even higher tide was forecast for after nightfall.

Venice , over the centuries, has diverted rivers to protect the lagoon and extended the barrier islands. But now, the sea level is rising several millimeters Residents say that climate change is not the only threat, and the city is also struggling to contend with runaway tourism — by some counts, 30 million

Residents and tourists could be seen wading through water in rain boots. The water invaded the ground floors of many historic palazzos, stores, restaurants and At the news conference the mayor said that while wandering through the city, “I found people in tears because they had lost everything.

VENICE —Even by the standards of a city built in a shallow lagoon, the water on Thursday was everywhere that it wasn’t supposed to be.

a man standing in front of a building: A man walks in the flooded crypt of St. Mark's Basilica in Venice on Wednesday.© Marco Bertorello/AFP/Getty Images A man walks in the flooded crypt of St. Mark's Basilica in Venice on Wednesday.

Nearly knee-high, the floodwaters spread across the city’s main piazza, turning it into a vast lake for seagulls. At the nearby millennium-old basilica, the last inches of water remained in the crypt even after a day of pumping, collecting around the tomb of a Roman Catholic cardinal. All around the busiest parts of the city, the water slicked the floors of cafes and Murano glass shops and seeped into hotel lobbies, leaving a smell of sewage in its wake.

Venice flooding nearly touches level of infamous 1966 flood

  Venice flooding nearly touches level of infamous 1966 flood The mayor of Venice blamed climate change for flooding of the historic canal city that hit the second-highest levels ever, as the city braced for yet another wave on Wednesday. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The high-water mark hit 187 centimeters (74 inches) late Tuesday, meaning more than 85% of the city was flooded. The highest level ever recorded was 198 centimeters (78 inches) during infamous flooding in 1966.

Venice faced severe flooding as high tide waters and blustery winds swamped landmarks and streets in the northern Italian city on Oct.

The highest floods in decades have covered much of Italy' s City of Canals in water up to 6 feet deep. Some 85% of Venice is flooded , levels not Photos showed residents and tourists alike trudging through knee-deep floodwaters on Wednesday. Brugnaro estimated the cost of damages at several

Venice, on the surface, can rebound quickly from disastrous flooding. The tourists this week never left; one posed for pictures with soot and mud on her wedding dress. But the people who live here say the toll of repeated inundation is mounting — measured not only in the damage to businesses and precious art or architecture, but above all, in the sense that life in one of the world’s most improbable and spellbinding cities is becoming unviable.

“The reaction is to cry,” said Flavia Feletti, 77, who has lived in Venice for six decades. “I am afraid there is no solution. When I went out the day after the flooding, I met a kind of funeral in the city.”

Venice has thrived since the 5th century by taming the water all around it. In recent decades, even as the land has been sinking while the sea level has been rising, many Venetians figured the city would again find a way to evolve and hang on. But one major flood after the next is testing that faith, and a major civil engineering project to protect the city remains unfinished, slowed by corruption scandals, and might already be obsolete.

Climate change, corruption blamed for Venice flood devastation

  Climate change, corruption blamed for Venice flood devastation Much of Venice was underwater on Wednesday after the highest tide in 50 years ripped through the historic Italian city, beaching gondolas, trashing hotels and sending tourists fleeing through rapidly rising waters. Officials blamed climate change while shopkeepers on the Grand Canal raged against those who have failed to protect the UNESCO city from the high tide.

Venice : Tourists and residents wade through flood waters – video. Venice has been inundated by an exceptional high tide which put three-quarters of the lagoon city under water. Brugnaro said he had asked to talk to Italy’ s prime minster, Giuseppe Conte, to underline the urgency of the project, which

The water had already taken its toll on the marble columns, brought from Byzantium centuries ago. Mr. Campostrini pointed at one base, now a corroded green crumble They clog the narrow streets and have pushed out residents in favor of Airbnb apartments. Flooding , though, is the existential danger.

The city is endangered — not just as a tourist destination, but for the 50,000 people who continue to live in Venice year-round, and who know the water well enough to describe in detail how it is changing and becoming more threatening.

This week, in an event known as an “acqua alta,” a tide of more the six feet surged in from the Adriatic Sea and quickly covered 85 percent of the city. The flooding was the most severe in 50 years. But similar if less drastic flooding is becoming common. Some experts warn that Venice could be underwater within a century.

“It’s a city full of history,” said Vladimiro Cavagnis, a fourth-generation Venetian gondolier, who chauffeurs tourists on the city’s trademark rowing boats. “A history that, little by little, with water, will end up like the Atlantis. People are destroyed, anguished, sad. They see a city that is disappearing.”

Venice paralyzed by the worst flooding in half a century

  Venice paralyzed by the worst flooding in half a century Residents in the iconic city on a lagoon are used to water, but the mayor has called this year's high tides "apocalyptic," and says climate change is to blameVenice sits on a tidal lagoon, just above sea level, so the city's squares and streets often get wet at high tide. This week, though, the water peaked more than six feet above the usual level, and at least one death has been blamed on the flooding already.

VENICE , Italy — Tourists and Venetians alike donned high boots and took to strategically placed raised walkways on Tuesday to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city. Venice ' s tide forecast office said the water level peaked at about 4 feet 3 inches Tuesday morning but

The water has destroyed everything, and I will have to redo so much – work that took a lifetime The Venice mayor, Luigi Brugnaro, promised on Wednesday that the flood barrier would be completed. Tourists , who earlier in the day had been wading through thigh-deep water, seemed mostly oblivious

To be in Venice this week, at least in some of those most touristed parts, was to watch everyday life carry on when nature makes it highly impractical. Entrepreneurs sold cheap rainboots for 10 euros, and the city erected elevated walkways so visitors could move across flooded areas in narrow lines. Police barked at people who stopped on the planks to take flood-zone selfies.

a group of people standing in front of a building: People walk on a footbridge across the flooded St. Mark's Square in Venice on Thursday.© Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images People walk on a footbridge across the flooded St. Mark's Square in Venice on Thursday.

Elsewhere, though, Venetians were at work trying to return their city to what it had been days earlier. Employees swept water out of stores and took inventories of the damage. At St. Mark’s Basilica, closed to visitors because of the flooding, workers were monitoring the cathedral’s ornate and ancient flooring, finding pieces of marble that had chipped away as the saltwater receded.

“What should I do with this one?” a worker asked, holding up a deep red marble triangle, and showing it to Mario Piana, the head of restoration.

“Put it over by the altar,” Piana said, where more than a dozen other pieces had already been collected.

Venice flooded again 3 days after near-record high tide

  Venice flooded again 3 days after near-record high tide Waters are on the rise again Friday in Venice, where the tide is reaching exceptional levels just three days after the Italian lagoon city experienced its worst flooding in more than 50 years. The high tide Friday is projected to peak at 1.60 meters (more than 5 feet) which is far beyond normal levels.

Tourists with water-proofing on their feet march through the flooded lagoon cityCredit: AFP or Tourists trying to return to hotels via wooden walkways found that they had been swept away Right now, Venice has a total of 53,000 residents today – which is now from a high in the last century of

Flooding in Venice today has entered some of the city’ s most beloved tourist attractions, including However, the city experiences regular flooding and officials have taken steps to ensure visitors are Many residents are unfazed by the high waters, with some declaring the phenomenon makes Venice

Piana said at the peak of the flooding on Tuesday night, parts of the church were covered in a foot of water, and the days since then had been “chaos.”

He described the church as a fragile beauty — covered nearly from ceiling to floor with a mosaic of gold and marble. Parts of the flooring, uneven as a wave, date back to 1094. Even before this week, work was underway to remove salt from marble pillars.

“I’m worried,” Piana said. “I’m worried for the basilica.

“The acqua alta does not create immediate, obvious damages. On the outside, you do not immediately see anything. But it is comparable to radiation exposure. In a week, you lose your hair. In a year, you might be dead.”

Members of the municipal police stand by St. Mark's Basilica in Venice on Thursday.© Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images Members of the municipal police stand by St. Mark's Basilica in Venice on Thursday.

Venice, over the centuries, has diverted rivers to protect the lagoon and extended the barrier islands. But now, the sea level is rising several millimeters every year.

Offshore, at the inlets between those barrier islands, a massive project known as MOSE could potentially boost Venice’s protection — with floodgates that could be raised from the sea during high tide, sealing off the lagoon. The project, launched in 2003, was once forecast to finish in 2011. Then 2014. Now, projections call for completion in 2022.

Venice is underwater — and a preview of what climate change will bring to coastal cities

  Venice is underwater — and a preview of what climate change will bring to coastal cities Climate scientists have said Venice is a harbinger of problems facing coastal cities as melting ice sheets and warming oceans raise sea levels to unprecedented heights. Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post“Venice is the pride of all of Italy,” Brugnaro said in a statement, the Associated Press reported, as officials said the city was 70 percent submerged. “Venice is everyone’s heritage, unique in the world.” St. Mark’s Square, the city’s famous piazza, was closed as seagulls swarmed the knee-high water. The flood rose to over six feet in some areas.

Tourists larked around in the flooded St Mark' s Square in the sunshine, snapping selfies in their neon plastic boots and taking advantage of a respite in bad weather which has driven the high tides. Mayor Luigi Brugnaro has estimated the damage to Venice at hundreds of millions of euros (dollars).

Venice residents have been urged to take pictures and video footage of the damage to their homes in order to claim compensation later. At least 60 boats were damaged in the floods , according to civil protection authorities, including some pedestrian ferry boats. Three barges are said to have sunk.

Some experts say that if sea levels rise as predicted, the gates will need to be permanently raised, creating an equally serious problem: Venice would become a contained aquatic petri dish, and face issues with sewage, algae growth and microbiological pollution.

Older Venetians tend to remember the record-flooding of 1966, when such an event was more of an outlier. The flooding this week was just seven centimeters shy of that mark. Serious flooding also hit the city in 2018.

“Psychologically, it has been a blow,” said Maurizio Calligaro, 65, a native Venetian who headed the city’s civil protection for two decades, until 2014.

Calligaro said that for people in their 60s, the record flood was a “very strong shared trauma, not unlike the memory of war.” This time, though, “it took only five hours to do what ’66 did in 12. Such violence is intrinsic to climate change.”

Some Venetians, he said, are still resistant to the climate realities — and direct their anger at the problems with MOSE, a project that has cost 6 billion euros.

Residents say that climate change is not the only threat, and the city is also struggling to contend with runaway tourism — by some counts, 30 million visitors per year, who drive up costs for locals, compel Venetians to turn their apartments into Airbnbs and who drive an economy with jobs largely in tourism.

“There are too many tourists for every citizen,” said Aline Cendon, 52, who has written several books on Venice.

Cendon said that, after 1966, Venetians left in droves. She feared a similar response this time.

“A town, a city, without residents — what remains?” Cendon said. “It loses its very being.”

a group of people standing next to a body of water: People watch the sunset over San Giorgio Maggiore on Thursday.© Filippo Monteforte/Afp Via Getty Images People watch the sunset over San Giorgio Maggiore on Thursday.

chico.harlan@washpost.com

Ancient basilica on lagoon island hard hit in Venice flood .
MILAN (AP) — One of the most ancient churches of Venice, a Byzantine basilica established in the year 639, counts among the 60 churches damaged in three exceptional floods last week. A spokesman for the Venice patriarchy said Tuesday that the ancient basilica flooded three times last week, with the lagoon salt water seeping into mosaic floors and the marble columns. A spokesman for the Venice patriarchy said Tuesday that the ancient basilica flooded three times last week, with the lagoon salt water seeping into mosaic floors and the marble columns.

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