World: Australian man accused of starting bushfire to protect cannabis crop - - PressFrom - US
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World Australian man accused of starting bushfire to protect cannabis crop

09:40  17 november  2019
09:40  17 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

'Uncharted territory' as bushfires rage across Australia's east

  'Uncharted territory' as bushfires rage across Australia's east Dozens of bushfires raged out of control across eastern Australia on Friday, blocking escape routes for residents and shuttering the main highway linking major cities on the country's Pacific coast. More than 90 blazes pockmarked the New South Wales countryside, 50 of them uncontained, tearing through tens of thousands of hectares. More than 90 blazes pockmarked the New South Wales countryside, 50 of them uncontained, tearing through tens of thousands of hectares.

An Australian man has been accused of deliberately lighting a fire to protect his cannabis crop , sparking an out-of-control bushfire as blazes rage along Bushfire -prone Australia has experienced a horrific start to its fire season, which scientists say is beginning earlier and becoming more extreme

The man was arrested just after 2pm on Friday in Ebor and charged with intentionally causing fire and being reckless in its spread. Police will allege in court the man lit the fire as an attempt at a backburn to protect a cannabis crop and made no attempt to control the blaze. They also allege he hoped to

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Microsoft News US is supporting Microsoft News Australia in its campaign to help respond to the devastating bushfires that are ravaging the country. Together we are raising fundsfor Australian Red Cross, St Vincent De Paul Society and The Salvation Army. These organizations are helping communities across the country. You can help by donating here . For the latest news on this disaster from MSN Australia, visit Bushfire emergency.

An Australian man has been accused of deliberately lighting a fire to protect his cannabis crop, sparking an out-of-control bushfire as blazes rage along the country's east coast.

Four people have been killed and more than 300 homes destroyed in devastating bushfires that have razed more than one million hectares (2.5 million acres) along the eastern seaboard in just over a week.

Police said a 51-year-old man appeared before a local court on Saturday charged with intentionally lighting a fire at Ebor in New South Wales state in an attempt to protect his cannabis crop.

The alleged bungled attempt on Thursday at backburning -- a practice used by firefighters to clear the undergrowth that fuels fires -- quickly spread the flames and the man did not try to extinguish the blaze, according to police.

The Ebor fire is about 10,000 hectares in size -- and is still burning three days later.

Authorities believe arsonists are behind several other bushfires across badly-hit New South Wales as well as in neighbouring Queensland, and have appealed to the public for information leading to more arrests.

On Sunday, there were 130 fires burning across the two states, large swathes of which have already been ravaged by a crippling drought.

New South Wales firefighters undertook backburning as temperatures dipped on Saturday night, ahead of an expected deterioration in fire conditions early next week.

Parts of Queensland were facing "extreme fire danger" as high temperatures and low humidity were forecast to combine with storms to create challenging conditions for firefighters.

Bushfire-prone Australia has experienced a horrific start to its fire season, which scientists say is beginning earlier and becoming more extreme as a result of climate change, which is raising temperatures and sapping moisture from the environment.

Growing calls to curb fossil fuels and drastically cut greenhouse gas emissions are being ignored by the country's conservative government, which is eager to protect its highly lucrative mining industry.

Koalas are not functionally extinct, but they need our help .
Reports abound Australia's bushfires have pushed the cuddly, grey marsupial to the brink but scientists have raised questions.The bushfires wreaked havoc across Australia, destroying hundreds of thousands of hectares of bushland. It's estimated up to 1,000 koalas may have killed half the population living in Port Macquarie. A tragedy, for a species already struggling to survive against the effects of climate change , disease and deforestation.

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