World: Evo Morales Offers to Sit Out Bolivia's Next Election - - PressFrom - US
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World Evo Morales Offers to Sit Out Bolivia's Next Election

15:15  20 november  2019
15:15  20 november  2019 Source:   online.wsj.com

Bolivian President Evo Morales is resigning

  Bolivian President Evo Morales is resigning Bolivian President Evo Morales resigned Sunday amid growing opposition after an international audit found the results of last month's election could not be validated due to "serious irregularities."Morales said he was stepping down "for the good of the country," which has been roiled by protests in the days following the October 20 election.

Evo Morales , the exiled former president of Bolivia , said he is willing to sit out the country’ s next presidential election if he can finish the last few months of his In an interview Tuesday with The Wall Street Journal, the former Bolivian leader laid out what he said was a compromise solution to end the

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales has landed safely in Mexico, but his journey to political asylum had twists and turns as neighboring states reacted to the ongoing turmoil back home. Former President Evo Morales is welcomed by Mexico' s Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard in Mexico.

MEXICO CITY—Evo Morales, the exiled former president of Bolivia, said he is willing to sit out the country’s next presidential election if he can finish the last few months of his term and, together with the opposition, name a new electoral authority to oversee a fresh vote to choose a new leader.

In an interview Tuesday with The Wall Street Journal, the former Bolivian leader laid out what he said was a compromise solution to end the country’s political crisis, which began when the opposition and international observers accused him of trying to stay in power for a fourth consecutive term through a rigged ballot in the Oct. 20 elections.

Mexico grants asylum to Bolivia's Evo Morales, demands safe conduct

  Mexico grants asylum to Bolivia's Evo Morales, demands safe conduct BOLIVIA-ELECTION/MEXICO (UPDATE 1, PIX, TV):UPDATE 1-Mexico grants asylum to Bolivia's Evo Morales, demands safe conduct"We will immediately proceed to inform Bolivia's foreign ministry that under international law, it should offer safe conduct" to Morales, Mexico's Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard told reporters.

General elections were held in Bolivia on 20 October 2019. Voters elected all 130 members of the Chamber of Deputies and 36 senators and cast ballots for a joint slate of president and vice president.

Bolivia ' s President Evo Morales annouces his resignation © Reuters TV / Reuters. Ousted Bolivian President Evo Morales says he will not take part in the next presidential vote if the people are The political upheaval in Bolivia is a textbook coup that was carried out through violence and intimidation

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Mr. Morales, 60 years old, resigned Nov. 10 after growing turmoil in the aftermath of the vote prompted the head of the armed forces, Gen. Williams Kaliman, to recommend publicly that the president resign. Facing the loss of support from the security forces as demonstrations mounted against him, Mr. Morales resigned and left Bolivia in what he now calls a coup.

Since his departure, Bolivia has been racked with violent protests as his supporters clash with the de facto government led by interim President Jeanine Añez, who has promised new elections in coming months. Since Oct. 30, 27 people have died, the state human-rights ombudsman’s office reported.

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales arrives in Mexico after accepting political asylum

  Former Bolivian President Evo Morales arrives in Mexico after accepting political asylum MEXICO CITY - Former Bolivian President Evo Morales arrived Tuesday in Mexico, where authorities have granted him political asylum, as an opposition senator back in Bolivia declared herself interim president. Emerging from a Mexican air force jet in Mexico City, Morales was met on the tarmac by Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, who embraced the man who has led Bolivia for almost 14 years. Emerging from a Mexican air force jet in Mexico City, Morales was met on the tarmac by Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, who embraced the man who has led Bolivia for almost 14 years.

What' s next for Bolivia ? Bolivia ’ s democracy shaky as interim leader steps in. Image copyright Reuters. Image caption Former president Evo Morales described what happened in Sacaba as a In response, Mr Morales agreed to hold fresh elections . But his main rival, Carlos Mesa - who came

Bolivia ’ s economy has grown by an average of nearly 5% a year during his 13 years in power, double the Latin American average. Mr Morales , a former leader of a coca-growers’ union, has won three elections fairly and by large margins. He hopes to win a fourth in October.

Evo Morales sitting on a bench posing for the camera: Bolivia’s former president, Evo Morales, has been given asylum in Mexico. © Jordi Ruiz Cirera for The Wall Street Journal Bolivia’s former president, Evo Morales, has been given asylum in Mexico. “The mobilized people’s resounding demand is that the dictatorship should step down,” said Mr. Morales, referring to Ms. Añez’s interim government. “That means we finish our term, and in exchange we won’t be a candidate [in the next election]. … If it’s a matter of peace, so no more lives are lost, no problem, I renounce” the candidacy.

On Tuesday, three people were killed when protesters tried to storm a key fuel depot outside La Paz. Thousands of Mr. Morales’s supporters have tried to block fuel and food from reaching the capital in an attempt to force Ms. Añez from power. Mr. Morales has egged them on from Mexico.

“To the workers and the Bolivian people: This is a de facto government and not a transition government,” he wrote on Twitter Tuesday. “With repression, they are killing our people. They are traitors to our country.”

U.S. orders family members of government employees to leave Bolivia

  U.S. orders family members of government employees to leave Bolivia The United States on Tuesday ordered family members of U.S. government employees to leave Bolivia due to civil unrest in the South American country, the State Department said in a statement. © Photo by Javier Mamani/Getty Images LA PAZ, BOLIVIA - NOVEMBER 12: Demonstrators from El Alto area hold Whipala flags as military troops patrol during a protest asking the return of former President of Bolivia Evo Morales on November 12, 2019 in La Paz, Bolivia.

Juan Evo Morales Ayma (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈeβo moˈɾales]; born October 26, 1959) is a Bolivian politician and former cocalero activist who served as the President of Bolivia from 2006 to 2019.

And with the departure of Evo Morales they are trying to take advantage of that momentum and say: ‘Maybe we are the next Bolivia .’” Gallegos said that kind of rapid change seemed improbable in Venezuela – but with its economy in ruins and international pressure unlikely to ease in the immediate

Mr. Morales, who had ruled 14 years and is one of Latin America’s longest-serving leaders, said in the interview that the unrest would continue unless the two sides could reach a compromise and he could fly back to Bolivia.

“My great wish is to return quickly to Bolivia,” he said, adding that his presence in Bolivia is important to pacify the country.

Mr. Morales said he was “worried and sad” in exile in Mexico, whose president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, provided him with asylum and a platform to speak out about Bolivia’s politics. He said he is keeping a full schedule, meeting with Mexican officials and fielding phone calls from abroad.

He appears to be staying at a military base where he gets up at 6 a.m. to jog and exercise. After the interview, he said he was headed to a dinner at the embassy of Venezuela, whose far-left president is Washington’s main antagonist in South America. Mr. Morales said he looked forward to engaging in animated political discussions there.

Political analysts say the Bolivian interim government and the military are unlikely to trust that Mr. Morales wouldn’t want to stay in power if he returned.

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  What the End of Bolivia’s President Means for the Country Evo Morales, the President of Bolivia, fled to Mexico on Nov. 12, and his country now faces an uncertain future. Morales had little choice. Evidence that he had tried to steal his country’s latest presidential election pushed hundreds of thousands of protesters onto the streets of Bolivia’s largest cities in recent days. The critical moment came on Nov. 8, when a number of police officers joined the demonstrations.

Evo Morales , indigenous icon, loses support among Bolivia ' s native people. CHARAGUA, Bolivia —In 12 years as president of South America’s poorest country, Evo Morales has “He can sit for one minute with a businessman and the next with a worker,” said Gonzales, who stepped down

Bolivia ’ s former president Evo Morales arrives in Mexico last week after the country granted him But the most intense battles are playing out on the streets where the crisis began just a few weeks ago But his departure, far from resolving Bolivia ’ s crisis, has only deepened it. After his allies in the

“It’s interesting that he would say that [he won’t be a candidate], but I don’t think anyone in Bolivia will take it too seriously because they simply don’t trust him,” said Eduardo Gamarra, a Bolivia expert at Miami’s Florida International University. “I don’t think anyone is going to allow him to return to be president again, because it would mean the current president and cabinet resigning and returning to the status quo ante.”

Mr. Morales’s downfall began the evening of the Oct. 20 election, when 83% of the votes had been tallied and showed that his main adversary, Carlos Mesa, had forced a second round, which pollsters said Mr. Morales could lose. That’s when the Supreme Electoral Tribunal, under the control of the ruling party, stopped publishing returns. When the vote-counting resumed a day later, Mr. Morales’s lead gradually increased nearly to the 10 percentage points he needed to avoid a runoff. Three days later, on Oct. 23, Mr. Morales announced he had won.

A team of 36 election experts of 18 different nationalities from the Organization of American States, which had been invited to monitor the vote, found “serious irregularities” and suggested the vote be scrapped and new elections called.

In the interview, Mr. Morales said he won the election fairly and denied fraud. He called for a “truth commission” on the election made up of the Vatican, the United Nations and the U.S.-based Carter Center, a pro-democracy group started by the former U.S. president.

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Bolivia ’ s president Evo Morales is to run for a fourth term in office after his ruling party proclaimed him its candidate in 2019 elections , defying the results Bolivia ’ s constitution only allows two consecutive terms in office. He had sought to raise it to three straight terms. While this next election would be for

President Evo Morales of Bolivia , center, accompanied by deputies, heads to LA PAZ, Bolivia — When he was 46, Rene Paucara voted for Evo Morales , helping elect him as Bolivia ’ s first Mr. Paucara now fears that if the president wins again next year, he may be well on track to keep the job

Mr. Morales said the greatest obstacle to his return to Bolivia is what he asserted is an alliance between his right-wing opponents in Bolivia and the U.S., which has been a frequent target of his revolutionary rhetoric throughout his career.

“I have been told from people in a position to know that the Americans don’t want me back in Bolivia,” he said. “Why do the gringos fear an Indian?” he said laughing, using a slang term in Latin America for Americans.

Mr. Morales, who says he is in contact with allies back home, said he had received hundreds of messages from supporters, mayors and assorted officials who plead with him to return. “Evo, come help pacify us,” Mr. Morales said, recounting the messages.

Mr. Morales, who rose in prominence leading the union for growers of coca, first came to power in January 2006, as part of a leftist wave in South America that included Hugo Chávez in Venezuela, Rafael Correa in Ecuador, Néstor Kirchner in Argentina and others. Mr. Morales was re-elected twice, in 2009 and 2014.

His government was marked by social progress. Economic growth averaged more than 4%, among the highest in the region, and poverty fell fast. But he also increasingly ruled autocratically, said some of his old allies and political analysts.

When Mr. Morales lost a 2016 referendum that forbade him to seek a fourth term, the Supreme Court, whose justices he controlled, ruled that preventing him from running violated his human rights.

When asked if he was another in a long line of Latin American caudillos, or strongmen, who want to stay in power for good, he said that his consecutive terms were a rare period of political stability in a chronically unstable country, which had five presidents in five years before he was elected.

In a country like Bolivia, Mr. Morales said, economic development depends on political continuity. “It’s the wish of the people,” he said. Asked how the people expressed their will, he said the ballot box.

Write to Juan Montes at juan.montes@wsj.com and José de Córdoba at jose.decordoba@wsj.com

Bolivia's interim president signs off on new elections .
Bolivia's interim President Jeanine Anez signed off on new elections Sunday, in a key step towards ending weeks of unrest and turning the page on Latin American leftist icon Evo Morales. Right-wing Senate speaker Anez, who declared herself interim leader after Morales quit, signed the bill into law Sunday, vowing "clean, just and transparent" elections.At least 32 people have been killed in violence that erupted after a disputed election on October 20, with blockades causing severe fuel and food shortages in La Paz and other cities.

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