World: 'Massive' human rights violations in Bolivia merit outside probe: regional commission head - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

World 'Massive' human rights violations in Bolivia merit outside probe: regional commission head

00:30  27 november  2019
00:30  27 november  2019 Source:   reuters.com

Bill for new elections in Bolivia sails through Congress

  Bill for new elections in Bolivia sails through Congress Both chambers of Bolivia's Congress unanimously passed legislation on Saturday to annul the contested Oct. 20 elections and pave the way for a new vote without former president Evo Morales, a breakthrough in the political crisis. © AP Photo/Juan Karita Bolivia's interim President Jeanine Anez speaks during a press conference at the presidential palace, in La Paz, Bolivia, Saturday, Nov. 23, 2019. Bolivia’s Senate on Saturday unanimously approved a measure calling for new presidential elections that would exclude ousted leader Evo Morales, a key step toward pacifying a nation since an Oct.

Bolivia 's constitution and laws technically guarantee a wide range of human rights , but in practice these rights very often fail to be respected and enforced. “The result of perpetual rights violations by the Bolivian government against its people

Impunity for violent crime and human rights violations remains a serious problem in Bolivia . The administration of President Evo Morales has created a hostile environment for human rights defenders that undermines their ability to work independently.

By Mitra Taj

a man holding a sign: Executive Secretary for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States (IACHR/OAS) Paulo Abrao meets relatives of demonstrators who died during clashes with security forces, in Sacaba© Reuters/MITRA TAJ Executive Secretary for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States (IACHR/OAS) Paulo Abrao meets relatives of demonstrators who died during clashes with security forces, in Sacaba

COCHABAMBA, Bolivia (Reuters) - Bolivia may need outside help to probe a "massive" amount of human rights violations and post-election violence to ensure findings are seen as credible in the deeply divided South American nation, the head of the region's human rights commission told Reuters on Tuesday.

After a three-day visit to Bolivia, Paulo Abrão, who heads the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), recommended Bolivia seek help from an international panel of experts similar to one formed to investigate the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico.

Evo Morales Offers to Sit Out Bolivia's Next Election

  Evo Morales Offers to Sit Out Bolivia's Next Election Evo Morales, the exiled former president of Bolivia, said he is willing to sit out the country’s next presidential election if he can finish the last few months of his term and, together with the opposition, name a new electoral authority to oversee a fresh vote.In an interview Tuesday with The Wall Street Journal, the former Bolivian leader laid out what he said was a compromise solution to end the country’s political crisis, which began when the opposition and international observers accused him of trying to stay in power for a fourth consecutive term through a rigged ballot in the Oct. 20 elections.

Human right violations on WN Network delivers the latest Videos and Editable pages for News & Events, including Entertainment, Music, Sports The commission ’s primary functions and powers include conducting investigations into allegations of human rights abuses either on petitions filed by

What it Means to Violate Human Rights . "The 'disappearances' of detainees in the custody of Russian federal forces in Chechnya is a major human rights crisis that the Russian government and the international community must address." "While combat between federal forces and Chechen rebels

"Normally in these situations...national institutions aren't prepared to resolve such a massive grouping of violations" of human rights, Abrão said in an interview in Cochabamba, one of the regions hit hardest by recent unrest.

Abrão said he received contradictory accounts of how people died in the upheaval and noted deep distrust of authorities by family members of victims.

Bolivia spiraled into chaos after its Oct. 20 election was mired in controversy amid allegations it had been rigged in favor of President Evo Morales, who resigned under pressure from security forces and protesters.

Most of the at least 33 fatalities since the vote came after interim President Jeanine Áñez, a former Senator, took office on Nov. 12, and the military deployed against Morales backers who had blocked strategic roads to protest what they viewed as a coup.

Bolivia's Congress to vote on proposal for new elections: official

  Bolivia's Congress to vote on proposal for new elections: official Bolivia's Congress will vote on a proposal Saturday that could open the door to new elections in the crisis-hit country, as the caretaker government prepares to meet with protesters to end weeks of unrest. In a potential breakthrough in the crisis, the government announced late Friday that it would meet with various opposition groups at the presidential palace on Saturday afternoon. They hope to strike an agreement to "pacify the country," Public Works Minister Yerko Nunez told reporters.

Human rights advocates agree that, sixty years after its issue, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is still more a dream than reality. To help inform you of the true situation throughout the world, this section provides examples of violations of six Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human

Human rights violations in Pinochet's Chile were the crimes against humanity , persecution of opponents, political repression, and state terrorism committed by the Chilean Armed Forces, members of Carabineros de Chile and civil repressive agents members of a secret police

On Monday, Abrão was welcomed by thousands of people chanting "justice!" during his visit to the Cochabamba town of Sacaba, where nine people were shot dead in demonstrations against Áñez.

Abrão visited a roadside memorial for victims and listened to testimony of their family members and the wounded, who described the use of live ammunition by security forces to repress what they said had been a peaceful protest.

"My brother Julio Pinto is in intensive therapy," Felix Pinto, an indigenous farmer told Abrão and his team. "It's as if he's dead right now."

Áñez' government and the military deny security forces are to blame for the deaths, suggesting instigators killed the protesters to destabilize her government.

The attorney general has said that bullets found are not a type used by the military or police, but his office has yet to announce an investigation to find those responsible.

Despite ongoing hostilities, both sides have managed to reach a series of deals to pave the way for new elections and wind down road blockades and troops in the streets.

Abrão praised recent talks. "That's the only path toward a peaceful end to the crisis," he said. "Social pacification is the best environment to protect human rights."

(Reporting By Mitra Taj; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

Florida GOP candidate admits to racially charged insults to Latino teens .
After previous denials. Martin Hyde has admitted to telling a group of tennis players from Puerto Rico to "speak English" and go "cut the grass."Martin Hyde, a Republican who is running for the Sarasota City Commission, was accused of making the comments to the players, who were practicing at the city's Celsius Tennis Academy prior to the Casely International Championship.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 4
This is interesting!