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World Exclusive: U.S. troop drawdowns in Afghanistan 'not necessarily' tied to Taliban deal - Esper

01:40  03 december  2019
01:40  03 december  2019 Source:   reuters.com

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By Phil Stewart. LONDON (Reuters) - U . S . Defence Secretary Mark Esper said on Monday that any future troop drawdowns in Afghanistan were " not necessarily " linked to a deal with Taliban insurgents

U . S . Troops in Afghanistan . Afghan officials said they had not been consulted or even warned about the drawdown . And the timing was likely to complicate the American push for peace talks with the Taliban , which requires maintaining pressure, or at least holding the line, on the battlefield.

By Phil Stewart

a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: U.S. Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper delivers remarks before ringing the closing NASDAQ bell in New York© Reuters/DoD/Lisa Ferdinando FILE PHOTO: U.S. Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper delivers remarks before ringing the closing NASDAQ bell in New York

LONDON (Reuters) - U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Monday that any future troop drawdowns in Afghanistan were "not necessarily" linked to a deal with Taliban insurgents, suggesting some lowering of force levels may happen irrespective of the ongoing peace push.

The remarks by Esper in an interview with Reuters came on the heels of a Thanksgiving trip last week to Afghanistan by President Donald Trump, who spoke of potential troop reductions and said he believed the Taliban insurgency would agree to a ceasefire in the 18-year-old war.

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President Donald Trump paid a surprise Thanksgiving visit to Afghanistan , where he announced the U . S . and the Taliban have been engaged in ongoing He served turkey and thanked the troops , delivered a speech and sat down with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani before leaving just after midnight.

BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan — President Donald Trump made a surprise trip to Afghanistan on Thanksgiving to rally U . S . troops and promote the restart of It also was an opportunity to use the on-and-off talks with the Taliban to give him a foreign policy win as he heads into a tough reelection fight.

If honored by all sides, a ceasefire could lead to a significant reduction in violence. But U.S. military commanders would still focus on the threats associated with two other militant groups in Afghanistan: Islamic State and al Qaeda.

Speaking as he flew to London for a NATO summit, Esper said the Trump administration had been discussing potential reductions in troop levels for some time, both internally and with NATO allies.

"I feel confident that we could reduce our numbers in Afghanistan and still ensure that place doesn't become a safe haven for terrorists who could attack the United States," Esper said, without offering a figure.

"And our allies agree we can make reductions as well."

Asked whether such reductions would necessarily be contingent on some sort of agreement with the Taliban insurgency, Esper said: "Not necessarily."

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U . S . Troops in Afghanistan . Mr. Khalilzad, in discussing progress in the negotiations, said the Taliban ’ s demand remained an agreement over the withdrawal of foreign forces from Afghanistan , while the United States has sought assurances from the militant group that Afghanistan would not

HERAT, Afghanistan — Taliban fighters killed or captured an entire Afghan National Army company of more than 50 soldiers on Monday, Afghan officials said, the latest in a series of major attacks by the militant group even as it pursues a peace deal with the United States.

He did not elaborate.

There are currently about 13,000 U.S. forces in Afghanistan as well as thousands of other NATO troops. U.S. officials have said U.S. forces could drop to 8,600 and still carry out an effective, core counter-terrorism mission as well as some limited advising for Afghan forces.

A draft accord agreed in September before peace talks collapsed would have withdrawn thousands of American troops in exchange for guarantees that Afghanistan would not be used as a base for militant attacks on the United States or its allies.

Still, many U.S. officials privately doubt the Taliban could be relied upon to prevent al Qaeda from again plotting attacks against the United States from Afghan soil.

Esper did not hint at any developments in the coming days or suggest that new troop drawdowns in Afghanistan might figure into NATO discussions this week.

"I don't think there's any 'new' news right now, if you will. We've been discussing this for quite some time," Esper said, when asked if he would raise the issue in London.

About 2,400 U.S. service members have been killed in the Afghan conflict and many thousands more wounded.

(Reporting by Phil Stewart, Editing by Rosalba O'Brien and Cynthia Osterman)

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