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World Global Temperature Headed Toward 5 Degree Increase, WMO Says

13:40  03 december  2019
13:40  03 december  2019 Source:   bloomberg.com

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The world ’s average temperature is headed toward a gain of 3 degrees to 5 degrees Celsius (5.4 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century. The past five years and the past decade were almost certainly the hottest on record, according to the latest WMO study.

Global temperatures are on course for a 3- 5 degrees Celsius (5.4-9.0 degrees Fahrenheit) rise this century World Meteorological Organization ( WMO ) Secretary-General Petteri Taalas Scientists say that it is vital to limit the rise in global temperatures to 2 Celsius to avert more extreme weather

(Bloomberg) -- The world’s average temperature is headed toward a gain of 3 degrees to 5 degrees Celsius (5.4 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century.

JERSEY CITY, NJ - NOVEMBER 24: The sun sets on the skyline of lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on November 24, 2019 as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images)© Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images JERSEY CITY, NJ - NOVEMBER 24: The sun sets on the skyline of lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on November 24, 2019 as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images)

The findings by the World Meteorologic Organization are another indication of how far off track the planet is in meeting its target to contain global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius since the dawn of the industrial revolution.

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But as global average temperatures have risen half a degree in that span, these bleaching events have become a regular phenomenon. “My view is that 2 degrees is aspirational and 1. 5 degrees is ridiculously aspirational” said Gary Yohe, an environmental economist at Wesleyan University.

U.N. World Meteorological Organization ( WMO ) The IPCC report said at the current rate of warming, the world’s temperatures would likely reach 1. 5 C between 2030 and 2052 after an increase of 1C If the average global temperature temporarily exceeded 1. 5 C, additional carbon removal

That was the target in the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, a level that scientists identify as one where the worst impacts on the environment could be avoided. While a fluctuation of that level hardly registers during the course of a day, when applied to the climate it would mark the biggest shift in temperatures since the last ice age ended some 10,000 years ago.

“If we wanted to reach a 1.5 degree increase we would need to bend emissions and at the moment countries haven’t been following on their Paris pledges,” WMO Secretary General Petteri Taalas told reporters in Madrid, where envoys from almost 200 countries were attending a two-week United Nations conference on the issue.

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Average temperatures from January to October this year were already 1.1 degrees above the pre-industrial period, the WMO said.

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  ‘Bleak’ U.N. Report Finds World Heading to Climate Catastrophes Four years after countries struck a landmark deal in Paris to rein in greenhouse gas emissions in an effort to avert the worst effects of global warming, humanity is headed toward those very climate catastrophes, according to a United Nations report issued Tuesday, with China and the United States, the two biggest polluters, having expanded their carbon footprints last year. “The summary findings are bleak,” the report said, because countries have failed to halt the rise of greenhouse gas emissions even after repeated warnings from scientists. The result, the authors added, is that “deeper and faster cuts are now required.

For decades, researchers argued the global temperature rise must be kept below 2C by the end of this century to avoid the worst impacts. The idea of two degrees as the safe threshold for warming evolved over a number of years from the first recorded mention by economist William Nordhaus in 1975.

Global temperature records start around 1880 because observations did not sufficiently cover enough of the planet prior to that time. As the maps show, global warming doesn’t mean temperatures rose everywhere at every time by one degree . Temperatures in a given year or decade might rise 5

Signatories to the Paris Agreement pledged to implement measures to curb greenhouse gas emissions. But there are few indications that countries have fulfilled their promises, and no signs of improvement of the state of the atmosphere, Taalas said.

The past five years and the past decade were almost certainly the hottest on record, according to the latest WMO study. While 2016 was the warmest year on record, 2019 will end up being the second or third warmest. Emissions show no signs of slowing either and, on the contrary, they kept rising to record levels this year.

“The numbers on emissions are somewhat alarming,” Taalas said, adding that the world is on track for the highest greenhouse gas concentrations since the early 1980s.

Extreme weather events such as floods, forest fires, droughts, ice melting and rising sea levels were also extraordinary. Ocean warming is particularly concerning as it contributes to heatwaves on land, according to the WMO. As many as 38% of marine heatwaves this year were classified as strong.

Fires in South America and in eastern Siberia, drought in Australia, South Africa and southern Europe, along with cold episodes in North America and melting in the Arctic have all posted multi-year records.

“Once again in 2019, weather and climate related risks hit hard,” Taalas said. “Heatwaves and floods which used to be ‘once in a century events’ are becoming more regular occurrences.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Laura Millan Lombrana in Santiago at lmillan4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Luzi Ann Javier at ljavier@bloomberg.net, Reed Landberg, Stephen Voss

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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