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World U.S. Uighur bill's threat to surveillance economy puts China on offensive

05:15  06 december  2019
05:15  06 december  2019 Source:   reuters.com

TikTok tries to explain takedown of viral video about Uighurs in China

  TikTok tries to explain takedown of viral video about Uighurs in China Other the last day or so, a TikTok "makeup tutorial" video that was actually a call for viewers to investigate the detention of Uighur Muslims in China went viral on and off the platform. However, as The Guardian and others reported, TikTok temporarily banned the account of the teenager who created the video. According to her, this isn't the first time the platfom has tried to censor her account for speaking about the issue. This evening, asThis evening, as much of the US heads into a holiday weekend, TikTok offered a public apology and detailed timeline of events, where it claims that the ban was not related to the topic of this video.

By Matt Spetalnick, Patricia Zengerle and David Brunnstrom. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - China reacted angrily to President Donald Trump' s approval of legislation supporting Hong Kong protesters last month, but movement on another congressional bill , backing Uighur Muslims in China ' s northwest

The bill , which the House could vote on as early as Tuesday evening, would require the U . S . president to condemn Analysts say China ' s reaction to passage of the Uighur bill could be stronger, though some It would also effectively ban the export to China of items that can be used for surveillance of

By Matt Spetalnick, Patricia Zengerle and David Brunnstrom

a man standing in front of a building: FILE PHOTO:  A Chinese police officer takes his position by the road near what is officially called a vocational education centre in Yining© Reuters/Thomas Peter FILE PHOTO: A Chinese police officer takes his position by the road near what is officially called a vocational education centre in Yining

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - China reacted angrily to President Donald Trump's approval of legislation supporting Hong Kong protesters last month, but movement on another congressional bill, backing Uighur Muslims in China's northwest, has cut even closer to the bone and could trigger reprisals and hurt efforts to resolve the U.S.-China trade war.

U.S. congressional sources and China experts say Beijing appears especially sensitive to provisions in the Uighur Act passed by the House of Representatives this week banning exports to China of items that can be used for surveillance of individuals, including facial and voice-recognition technology.

TikTok apologizes for removing viral video criticizing Chinese treatment of Uighur Muslim community

  TikTok apologizes for removing viral video criticizing Chinese treatment of Uighur Muslim community The video was removed due to human error, TikTok says.TikTok, a social media platform where users post short videos, has been downloaded more than 1.5 billion times. The Chinese app is reportedly under investigation by the US over national security concerns.

Dec.03 -- Relations between Washington and Beijing are likely to see further strain after U . S . lawmakers passed a bill that could sanction Chinese officials for human rights abuses against Muslim minorities. NOW PLAYING: Video. China Vows Response to U . S . Bill on Xinjiang. Bloomberg.

The Xinjiang bill follows legislation supporting Hong Kong protesters signed into law last week by President China had already moved to sanction some human rights organizations and halt U . S The region has become a laboratory for surveillance technology, including facial recognition, and its

China will also be upset that the bill - which still requires Senate passage and Trump's signature to become law - calls for sanctions against a member of the powerful politburo for the first time. But its commercial stipulations have even more practical power to hurt the interests of Chinese leaders, sources say.

Senior members of both Congress and the Trump administration have sounded the alarm on China's detention of at least a million Uighur Muslims, by U.N. estimates, in the northwestern region of Xinjiang as a grave abuse of human rights and religious freedom. China rejects the charges.

A Chinese government source, who did not want to be identified, told Reuters China could tolerate the Hong Kong bill, but the Uighur Act went too far and could jeopardize efforts to reach a phase-one deal to end a trade war buffeting the global economy that Trump has made a key priority.

China's facial recognition roll out reaches into mobile phones, shops and homes

  China's facial recognition roll out reaches into mobile phones, shops and homes China's facial recognition roll out reaches into mobile phones, shops and homesSHANGHAI (Reuters) - China on Sunday put into effect new regulations that require Chinese telecom carriers to scan the faces of users registering new mobile phone services, a move the government says is aimed at cracking down on fraud.

China is trying to balance having a strong stance to the domestic audience showing they are standing up to foreign interference while not putting pressure on its deteriorating economy . U . S . House Votes on Uighur Rights Bill .

(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The U . S . House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved legislation that would impose sanctions on Chinese officials over human rights abuses against Muslim minorities, prompting Beijing.

A U.S. congressional source also said a Washington-based figure close to the Chinese government told him recently it disliked the Uighur bill more than the Hong Kong bill for “dollars and cents reasons,” because the former measure contained serious export controls on money-spinning security technology, while also threatening asset freezes and visa bans on individual officials.

Victor Shih, an associate professor of China and Pacific Relations at the University of California, San Diego, said mass surveillance was big business in China and a number of tech companies there could be hurt by the law if it passes.

China spent roughly 1.24 trillion yuan ($176 billion) on domestic security in 2017 - 6.1% of total government spending and more than was spent on the military. Budgets for internal security, of which surveillance technology is a part, have doubled in regions including Xinjiang and Beijing.

Woman in Netherlands says she leaked secret Chinese documents on Uighur 're-education' camps

  Woman in Netherlands says she leaked secret Chinese documents on Uighur 're-education' camps The documents were the foundation of stories last month by NBC News and journalists around the world on the inner workings of the Uighur camps in China.The documents were the foundation of stories last month by NBC News and more than 75 journalists in 14 countries around the world probing the inner workings of the centers.

China hasn’t specified which companies would be affected by the blacklist, though courier firm FedEx Corp (NYSE:FDX). has been under particular scrutiny this year. The U . S . House of Representatives is expected to vote Tuesday on the Xinjiang bill , which was passed by the Senate in September.

Chinese state media said the government will soon publish a list of “unreliable entities” that could lead to sanctions against U . S . companies, signaling that trade talks between the two nations are increasingly under threat from disputes over human rights in Hong Kong and Xinjiang.

Shih said investors in such firms included family members of China's political elite, who could suffer financially if the bill became law.

"This bill affects bottom lines, this is why there is a stronger reaction from Beijing," he said.

Shih said the bill would affect the ability of Chinese companies to procure technology from the United States and this would adversely affect their product development. He said it could also affect their ability to list on U.S. markets.

China has warned that the Uighur bill would affect bilateral cooperation, raising concerns about the impact on trade talks, less than two weeks before a new round of U.S. tariffs already threatening another breakdown is scheduled to take effect.

In editorials on Thursday, Chinese official media called for harsh reprisals in response to bill. [L8N28F02P]

The English-language China Daily called the bill a "stab in the back, given Beijing's efforts to stabilize the already turbulent China-U.S. relationship" and warned of reprisals.

"It seems an odds-on bet that more (sanctions) can be expected if the latest approval for State Department meddling goes into the statute books," it said.

China tightens info control after leaks on detention camps

  China tightens info control after leaks on detention camps The Xinjiang regional government in China’s far west is deleting data, destroying documents, tightening controls on information and holding high-level meetings in response to leaks of classified papers on its mass detention camps for Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities, according to four people in contact with government employees there. 

The bill , which the House could vote on as early as Tuesday evening, would require the U . S . president to condemn abuses against Muslims and call for the closure of mass detention camps in China has consistently denied any mistreatment of Uighurs and says the camps are providing vocational training.

KASHGAR, China — A God’ s -eye view of Kashgar, an ancient city in western China , flashed onto a wall-size screen, with colorful icons marking police stations, checkpoints and the locations of recent security incidents.

China's envoy to the United States, Cui Tiankai, said on Wednesday the two countries were trying to resolve their differences over trade, but "destructive forces" were trying to drive a wedge between them.

The White House has yet to say whether Trump would sign or veto the bill, which contains a provision allowing the president to waive sanctions if he determines it to be in the national interest.

No dates has yet been scheduled for a vote on the bill in the Republican-controlled Senate, a decision which rests with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Senator Jim Risch, the Republican chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said lawmakers would proceed with caution.

“Because of the relationship we have with China, because of the trade negotiations going on, and everything else, it's important that we don't do anything that would cause those negotiations not to bear fruit," Risch told Reuters.

(Additional reporting by Heather Timmons, Andrea Shalal and David Lawder; writing by David Brunnstrom; Editing by Mary Milliken, Heather Timmons and Tom Brown)

Japanese manga about a Uighur woman’s persecution in China becomes viral hit .
Japanese artist uses the power of manga to bring the repression of the Uighurs in China to a wider audience.A Japanese comic book telling the powerful and tragic tale of a 29-year-old Uighur woman from China has become a surprise viral hit.

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