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World Australian Hunters to Kill 10,000 Feral Camels from Helicopters Amid Worsening Drought

22:43  09 january  2020
22:43  09 january  2020 Source:   livescience.com

Military moves in to help mass-scale evacuation from Australian bushfires

  Military moves in to help mass-scale evacuation from Australian bushfires AUSTRALIA-BUSHFIRES/ (PIX, TV):Military moves in to help mass-scale evacuation from Australian bushfires

A lot of camels are going to die this week, as Australian hunters mow them down from the air.

a herd of sheep standing on top of a field: Camels are pictured on an Australian camel dairy farm in April 2016. Camels are not native to Australia, and thirsty feral camels have become a significant problem in recent months amid severe drought and fires.© Provided by Live Science Camels are pictured on an Australian camel dairy farm in April 2016. Camels are not native to Australia, and thirsty feral camels have become a significant problem in recent months amid severe drought and fires.

More than 1 million of the humped creatures wander Australia. They aren't from the continent, but arrived in the 1840s on ships — brought in as an ideal means of transport for the country's vast deserts. Nearly 200 years later, they're mostly feral pests, destroying habitats and competing with humans and native species for resources, according to Earther. And amid the worst drought and fire season in national memory, Australia wants to kill 10,000 of them from helicopters.

A father and his 9-year-old daughter were killed while hunting. They were mistaken for deer

  A father and his 9-year-old daughter were killed while hunting. They were mistaken for deer A South Carolina man and and his daughter died after being shot while hunting deer on New Year's Day, a relative of the victims told CNN affiliate WCBD. Kim Drawdy, 30, and his 9-year-old daughter, Lauren, were hunting Wednesday near their home in Walterboro, South Carolina, according to Benny Drawdy, Kim's brother.The two were shot by hunters after being mistaken for deer, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR).

Indigenous elders in the state of South Australia approved the plan, after a series of incidents in which parched camels, desperate for water in the drought-ravaged landscape, created major problems for their human neighbors, according to News.com.au. The killing is expected to take place in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara territories in the northwest part of the state, according to the BBC. The cull, which began yesterday (Jan. 8), should last five days.

Related: Devastating Photos of Raging Wildfires in Australia

"We have been stuck in stinking hot and uncomfortable conditions, feeling unwell, because the camels are coming in and knocking down fences, getting in around the houses and trying to get to water through air conditioners," Marita Baker, an indigenous leader, told The Australian.

Rain brings brief respite in Australian bushfire crisis

  Rain brings brief respite in Australian bushfire crisis A second day of light rain brought relief for firefighters battling bushfires that have killed 24 people across southeastern Australia, but hot, windy conditions are expected to return later in the week, officials warned on Monday. © Photo by Brett Hemmings/Getty Images WINGELLO, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 06: A resident throws a bucket of water onto a smoldering tree on his property on January 06, 2020 in Wingello, Australia. Cooler conditions and light rain has provided some relief for firefighters in NSW who continue to battle bushfires across the state.

In some instances, the camels have managed to contaminate precious water sites, News.com.au reported.

The mass camel cull is a small piece of a much larger tragedy impacting Australia. The country just got done with its hottest year on record (even as 2019 was the second hottest on record across the globe), and South Australia got less rain in the last 11 months than at any other point in recorded history. According to Australian researchers, the increasing heat and lower precipitation is making the continent more susceptible to extreme weather events, most notably massive bushfires. And once fires start, they tend to be much worse.  So far this fire season, a region as large as South Korea has burned, killing 24 people and likely well over a billion animals.

According to the Australian government's climate projections, this unusually dry season is likely just an early look at what's to come for the country as the climate changes. Already the continent is warmer and dryer than ever, and those trends are expected to continue and worsen, setting the country up for even more significant fires in the future.

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Originally published on Live Science.

Australia fires latest: Rain and hail pelt fire-ravaged states, bringing new risks -- and potential relief .
Severe thunderstorms are pelting some regions of Australia suffering from historic wildfires with powerful rain, bringing much-needed relief to firefighters battling some of the worst blazes the country has seen in decades. "Our fingers are crossed that this continues over the coming days," the New South Wales Rural Fire Service (RFS) said Friday in a tweet. Rain has fallen on most firegrounds in the state over the last 24 hours, the RFS said. However, it wasn't enough to put out the flames. Eighty-two fires are still burning, including 30 that are yet to be contained.

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