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World Australia drops 4,000 pounds of food to save starving wildlife

03:20  13 january  2020
03:20  13 january  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

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Australia drops tons of food to help starving wildlife . The New South Wales government used aircraft to drop more than 4 , 000 pounds of food , mostly carrots and sweet potatoes, to colonies of brush-tailed rock-wallabies that were left stranded as massive wildfires ravaged their habitat.

Wildlife officials have dropped more than 2 tons of food , mostly carrots and sweet potatoes, to help animals displaced by fires in southeastern Australia . https PagesMediaTV & filmTV networkABC NewsVideosAustralian government drops 4 , 000 pounds of food to save starving wildlife .

Microsoft News US is supporting Microsoft News Australia in its campaign to help respond to the devastating bushfires that are ravaging the country. Together we are raising funds for Australian Red Cross, St Vincent De Paul Society and The Salvation Army. These organizations are helping communities across the country. You can help by donating here . For the latest news on this disaster from MSN Australia, visit Bushfire emergency.

a kangaroo standing on a rock: The Australian government dropped carrots and sweet potatoes, Jan. 11, 2020, to feed animals that have been stranded by relentless brush fires.© Matt Kean MP/Facebook The Australian government dropped carrots and sweet potatoes, Jan. 11, 2020, to feed animals that have been stranded by relentless brush fires.

The Australian government is using helicopters and airplanes to help feed starving animals displaced by the country's wildfire crisis.

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The New South Wales government is working to help feed hungry wildlife left starving after the deadly Australian bushfires, which has claimed the lives of at least 27 people and likely more than a billion Aircrafts Drop Nearly 4 ,500 Lbs. of Food on Bushfire Ravaged Australia to Save Starving Animals.

Australia is dropping thousands of pounds of food across some areas impacted by the wildfires that devastated the nation in an effort to help the wallaby population, the New South Wales environment department announced Sunday. More than 4 , 000 pounds of carrots and sweet potatoes are being

The New South Wales government used aircraft to drop more than 4,000 pounds of food, mostly carrots and sweet potatoes, to colonies of brush-tailed rock-wallabies that were left stranded as massive wildfires ravaged their habitat.

The brush-tailed rock-wallaby was already endangered in southeastern Australia before the fires began in September and government officials said their survival could be complicated further by the ongoing crisis. The fires are estimated to have killed more than a billion animals and scorched more than 8.4 million hectacres -- about twice the size of Maryland.

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"Initial fire assessments indicate the habitat of several important Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby populations was burnt in the recent bushfires," New South Wales Environment Minister Matt Kean said Sunday. "The wallabies were already under stress from the ongoing drought, making survival challenging for the wallabies without assistance."

The Australian government dropped carrots and sweet potatoes, Jan. 11, 2020, to feed animals that have been stranded by relentless brush fires.© Matt Kean MP/Facebook The Australian government dropped carrots and sweet potatoes, Jan. 11, 2020, to feed animals that have been stranded by relentless brush fires.

Over the last week, nearly 2,000 pounds of sweet potatoes and carrots were sent to colonies in the state's Capertee and Wolgan valleys; 2,000 pounds were sent to areas of Yengo National Park; and about 200 pounds of food and water were dropped in the Kangaroo Valley, government officials in New South Wales.

Kean said the drops are one of the most widespread relief efforts of their kind for brush-tailed rock-wallabies. The plan is designed to help maintain the animal colonies and allow them to recover.

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"The provision of supplementary food is one of the key strategies we are deploying to promote the survival and recovery of endangered species like the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby," Kean said. "The wallabies typically survive the fire itself, but are then left stranded with limited natural food as the fire takes out the vegetation around their rocky habitat."

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The fires have claimed the lives of at least 25 people and destroyed more than 2,000 homes. University of Sydney ecologist Chris Dickman estimated that more than a billion animals have been killed since the fires began in early September, with about 800 million killed in New South Wales alone.

Fire seasons regularly take place in the country, but this year has been particularly devastating. The country experienced one of its hottest and driest years, in part, because of the Indian Ocean dipole, which is a variation in sea surface temperature on the Indian Ocean that drives the weather patterns.

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The IOD was in its strongest positive phase in more than 20 years, resulting in conditions that led to cooler sea surface temperatures near Australia and, in turn, less rain for the country.

With the fire season expected to rage for the next few months, Australians are doubtful that wildlife will fully recover.

"I think there's nothing quite to compare with the devastation that's going on over such a large area so quickly. It's a monstrous event in terms of geography and the number of individual animals affected," Dickman said in an interview with NPR last week.

"We know that Australian biodiversity has been going down over the last several decades, and it's probably fairly well known that Australia's got the world's highest rate of extinction for mammals," he added. "It's events like this that may well hasten the extinction process for a range of other species. So, it's a very sad time."

ABC News' Isabelle Philippe contributed to this report.

Australian States Start Clean-Up From Fires With Claims Rising .
The New South Wales government will coordinate the clean-up of insured and uninsured residential and commercial properties after the state recorded the most number of houses destroyed in the deadly wildfires. Under the plan, the state government will appoint major contractors to do the work, which will include the clearing of asbestos-contaminated and fire-impacted materials, dangerous debris and trees and the removal of concrete slab foundations.

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