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World Mikhail Mishustin: What we know about Russia's new prime minister

18:35  16 january  2020
18:35  16 january  2020 Source:   cnn.com

Russian prime minister and government resign after Putin speech

  Russian prime minister and government resign after Putin speech Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said on Wednesday that his government was resigning to give President Vladimir Putin room to carry out the changes he wants to make to the constitution.   © Sputnik/Dmitry Astakhov/Pool via REUTERS Russian President Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev speak before a meeting with government members in Moscow, Russia January 15, 2020. The unexpected announcement, which came shortly after Putin proposed a nationwide vote on sweeping changes that would shift power from the presidency to parliament, means Russia will also get a new prime minister.

Russian President Vladimir Putin nominated Mikhail Mishustin , a 53-year-old chief of the Russian Federal Tax Service for the position of Russian prime minister after Dmitry Medvedev resigned on Wednesday. A previously little- known tax technocrat is now set to head the Russian government.

Russian lawmakers approved Russian President Vladimir Putin's nomination for a new prime minister on Thursday, following a series of bombshell announcements The State Duma, Russia ' s lower house of parliament, voted in favor of tax authority chief Mikhail Mishustin . He received 383 votes out of the

He may not even have had an English-language Wikipedia page on Wednesday morning, but former tax official Mikhail Mishustin is now Russian prime minister.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Mikhail Mishustin, a technocrat with little in the way of a public profile, is Russia's new prime minister.© Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images Mikhail Mishustin, a technocrat with little in the way of a public profile, is Russia's new prime minister.

Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma, confirmed Mishustin's new role Thursday amid a major political shakeup.

Prior to his appointment, Mishustin served as the head of the Federal Tax Service, where he forged a reputation as a skilled technocrat who successfully reformed the country's fiscal system.

Putin engineers shakeup that could keep him in power longer

  Putin engineers shakeup that could keep him in power longer President Vladimir Putin engineered a surprise shakeup of Russia's leadership Wednesday, proposing changes to the constitution that could keep him in power well past the end of his term in 2024. Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev resigned his post after Putin announced the proposed constitutional amendments. Putin kept his longtime ally in the Kremlin's leadership structure, appointing him to the newly created post of deputy head of the presidential Security Council.

Russia will soon get a new prime minister — with Mikhail Mishustin , who heads the country's tax service, tapped to take on the role. The little- known head of Russia ' s tax service, Mikhail Mishustin , was named as the next prime minister of Russia hours after Dmitry Medvedev resigned

Russia has confirmed a new prime minister after the lower house of Parliament approved Vladimir Putin' s choice for the job and the President formally

Mishustin is largely unknown to the Russian public and had previously showed little political ambition.

He told Russia's parliament that the country must preserve macroeconomic stability, maintain inflation around 4%, and accelerate work on President Vladimir Putin's flagship "national projects" development program, Reuters reported Thursday.

Mishustin's appointment comes after previous prime minister Dmitry Medvedev, along with the entire Russian government, resigned Wednesday to clear the way for reforms that could potentially extend Putin's grip on power after his presidential term ends in 2024.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Mikhail Mishustin, President Vladimir Putin's nominee for the post of prime minister, speaks to lawmakers during a session of the State Duma lower parliament in Moscow on January 16, 2020.© Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images Mikhail Mishustin, President Vladimir Putin's nominee for the post of prime minister, speaks to lawmakers during a session of the State Duma lower parliament in Moscow on January 16, 2020.

Putin has proposed constitutional amendments that would effectively strengthen the powers of the prime minister and parliament at the expense of the presidency -- weakening his successor in the process -- but the exact machinations behind the plan remain unclear.

How Vladimir Putin just consolidated his czardom

  How Vladimir Putin just consolidated his czardom Dissolving Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev's government and outlining major constitutional reforms, President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday moved to assert more explicitly his absolute control over Russian politics. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); This is Putin's clearest signal yet that he intends to continue as Russia's master for the long term.

Russian government sources told the BBC that ministers did not know about the government' s resignation ahead of the announcement. Image caption Head of the tax service, Mikhail Mishustin (L), has been put forward by Mr Putin as the new prime minister .

Russian President Vladimir Putin has suggested the head of Federal Tax Service as a candidate for the post of Prime Minister after the government resigned earlier on Tuesday. Putin has met with Mishustin and offered him the PM' s position which he accepted, the Kremlin said. Mishustin went to the State

Putin nominated Mishustin for the prime minister's post late Wednesday, and the new appointee is known for his innovative work in bringing tax collection into the digital economy.

Born in 1966, the new prime minister studied systems engineering and later received two PhDs in economics.

Married with three sons, Mishustin is a pianist and hockey player who also sits on the supervisory board of Russia's CSKA hockey club.

He has also been praised by state media, in particular by Margarita Simonyan, the editor-in-chief of Russia's state-run RT network.

"Mishustin -- this is digitalization, clarity, modern professionalism, decency, the elimination of barriers to legitimate activity, innovative solutions, openness to world technology while taking care of proper sovereignty ... hostility to violent power methods -- in short, everything that we need right now," Simonyan tweeted.

Russia's Putin remains secretive about his future role .
Russian President Vladimir Putin remained tight-lipped about his future role Wednesday as he fast-tracks a set of constitutional changes widely seen as an attempt to maintain his dominance over the nation's political scene after his current term ends in 2024. Asked at a meeting with students if Russia could follow the example of Kazakhstan, where a longtime president stepped down last year but continued calling the shots by assuming another prominent position, Putin shrugged off the idea as unfit for Russia.

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