•   
  •   
  •   

World Nepal offers locust bounty as swarms threaten crops

16:15  30 june  2020
16:15  30 june  2020 Source:   msn.com

A plague amid a pandemic: East Africa, West Asia combat surging locust outbreak

  A plague amid a pandemic: East Africa, West Asia combat surging locust outbreak The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization estimates 450 billion pests have been killed since January, but the battle against the massive, crop-destroying swarms is far from over."It was like a storm," Gatiba, 45, said by telephone. "It was like hail. They covered everywhere. Even there was no sun.

The worst locust plague in 25 years is wiping out East Africa's crops , further straining food supplies in an area that is already at risk from bad weather

Desert locusts swarm India's crops . Swarms of locust attack in the walled city of Jaipur, Rajasthan, Monday, May 25, 2020. More than half of Rajasthans 33 districts are affected by invasion by these crop -munching Desert locusts have invaded India’s Rajasthan region, threatening summer crops .

Nepal is offering farmers cash rewards for catching desert locusts to limit the damage caused by the destructive swarms that have ravaged harvests in India and Pakistan.

a close up of a hand: Nepal is offering farmers cash rewards for catching locusts instead of using pesticides © PRAKASH MATHEMA Nepal is offering farmers cash rewards for catching locusts instead of using pesticides

South Asia is experiencing its worst infestation in decades, with the plague of locusts devastating agricultural heartlands and are now entering Nepal.

"Our decision is aimed at encouraging people to catch the insects instead of using pesticides which might be harmful to the environment," agriculture ministry spokesman Khagendra Prasad Sharma, who handles the Far West Province, told AFP.

Botswana finds more dead elephants, says test results due this week

  Botswana finds more dead elephants, says test results due this week Botswana finds more dead elephants, says test results due this weekOfficials told reporters near the Okavango Delta on Thursday that they had now verified 281 carcasses and that the deaths were concentrated in an area of 8,000 square km that is home to about 18,000 elephants.

Argentina and Brazil are monitoring the movement of a 15-square-kilometer locust swarm in Argentina’s northeast.

Plague threatens regional food supplies, as swarm cross from neighbouring Somalia, Ethiopia into Kenya. UP NEXT. NOW PLAYING: Technology. Locust swarms threatens East Africa's crops .

a group of bushes and trees: South Asia is experiencing its worst infestation in decades, with the plague of locusts devastating agricultural heartlands © Banaras KHAN South Asia is experiencing its worst infestation in decades, with the plague of locusts devastating agricultural heartlands

Farmers and other locals in two provinces that have already been invaded this week will be offered up to 25 rupees (21 US cents) for every kilogramme (2.2 pounds) of the insects.

The locusts are caught using huge mosquito nets that block their flight. They are also more easily caught at night when they are resting.

The migratory pests are then swept into large bags and brought to officials.

In the past three days, some 10 kilogrammes of locusts have been collected in the southern city of Butwal, province official Yam Narayan Devkota said.

"They are being collected in other areas too. Depending on the volume, they might be used as feed for chicken and livestock," Devkota added.

Locust swarms have gnawed their way through crops across East Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and parts of India this year, and experts fear their numbers will explode as monsoon rains arrive this month.

In Pakistan, farmers are catching locusts to sell to officials -- with the pests then turned into chicken feed -- in a bid to offset the huge losses caused by the swarms.

Nepal's agriculture ministry said that so far, the swarms have yet to swell to huge numbers and there have been no major crop losses.

Pompeo pushes back on Russian bounty reports .
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday accused journalists of spreading misinformation related to reports that Russia offered bounties to Taliban-backed fighters to kill U.S. service members in Afghanistan. © The Hill Pompeo pushes back on Russian bounty reports The secretary further refused to discuss what he knew of intelligence briefings about the bounties, saying such public discussions put American soldiers at risk. "A lot of what you said suggests knowledge that I don't think you actually have," Pompeo told one reporter who asked about the Russian bounties.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!